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Siiperintenjeiit's Annual Rcpi 




696807 



In School Committee, 

December 1, 1890. 

Voted, That the Secretary of this Committee make the 
Annual Report. 



Report of the Secretary. 



By direction of the School Committee, I submit to our 
fellow-citizens the following Report for the year 1890. 

STATISTICS. 

POPULATION. 

The population of the city (census of 1880) was 26,875 

The population of the city (census of 1885) was 33,393 

The population of the city (census of 1890) was 40,705 

II. SCHOOL CENSUS. 

School census, May, 1888 (children between 5 and 15 years of age), 6,206 
School census. May, 1890 (children between 5 and 15 years of age), 6,833 

SCHOOL CENSUS BY WARDS, 1890. 

Ward One, 2,007 

Ward Two, 713 

Ward Three, 677 

Ward Four, 439 

Ward Five, 686 

Ward Six, 2,311 

6,833 

Increase in the number of pupils in the city between the ages of five 
and fifteen, for two years, 625. 

A State law requires the census of children between the 
ages of five and fifteen to be taken each year during the 
month of May. Upon this enumeration of children the 
apportionment of state aid for school purposes is made to 
cities and towns. The cost of taking this census in New 



4 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Bedford is about three hundred dollars a year, for which 
no monied return is made from the state fund, as cities of 
the size and valuation of this city are excluded from the 
apportionment. The city receives, however, under state 
law, a large sum of money for school purposes each year 
from the proceeds of the dog tax, and a sum can well be 
spared each year from the dog fund for the school census. 
This census has been taken in the citv with all the 
care possible, and undoubtedly the returns are quite accu- 
rate. The shifting character of a certain portion of the 
population, and the different nationalities represented, 
make it, however, a difficult matter to enumerate the chil- 
dren with absolute accuracy. The figures, therefore, 
represent rather less than more of the actual number of 
children of the enumerated ages who are in the city, 
although the actual number belonging in the schools 
shows an increase that corresponds very closely to the 
increase shown by the census. 

in. SCHOOLS. 

nigh, 1 

Frainiug, 1 

GramDiar, 4 

Primary, 12 

Country, 5 

Mill, 2 

Farm, 1 

Total, 26 

IV. SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 
Number buildings owned by the city, 25 

ROOMS USKD FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES (DAY SCHOOLS), lNCLi:i)I\<i HALLS 

ANI> RFX^ITATION ROOMS, 
nigh, 17 

Training, S> 

Grammar, 38 

Primary, 57 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



Mill, 
Country, 



4 

7 



Room^i unoccupied, g 

Total, m 

Rooms used for both day and evening schools, 20 

Rooms used for evening drawing schools, 3 

Total, ^ 

V. SEATS. 

Number seats occupied : 

High, 343 

Grammar, 1,465 

Primary, 2,477 

Training, 287 

Mill, 112 

Country, 219 

Total, 4,903 

VL TEACHERS. 

Whole number in service December 19, 1890 : 

High school, 14 

Training school, 15 

Grammar schools, 41 

Primary schools, 52 

Country schools, 7 

Mill schools, 4 

Special teachers, 5 

Temporary assistants, 2 

Evening schools, 48 

Total, 188 

VII. PUPILS. DAY SCHOOLS, 1890. 

Whole number pupils enrolled of all ages, 5,853 

Avenige number pupils belonging, 4,609 

Average daily attendance, 4,100 

Per cent, of attendance, 89 

Number of half-days' absence, 193,316 

Number cases of tardiness, 14,287 

Number cases of dismissal, 15,239 



O SCHOOL REPORT. 

Number eases truancy reported by teachers, 244 

Number cases of corporal punisbmeut, 1,222 

Half-days' absence of teachers, 1,498 

Number cases tardiness by teachers, 147 

Number visits made the schools by Superintendent, 481 

Number visits made the schools by Committee, 693 

Number visits made the schools by parents and others, 2,810 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Boys. GlrlB. 

Whole number pupils enrolled, 1,203 730 1,993 

Average number belonging, 900 

Average nightly attendance, 663 

Per cent, of attendance, 73 

Total nights' absence, 18,606 

Number cases of tardiness, 2,972 

Number visits made by Committee, 96 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL (Fall term). 

Boya. Glrlt». 

Whole number pupils enrolled, 69 15 84 

Average number belonging, 64 

Average nightly attendance, 57 

Per cent, of attendance, 89 

Total nights' absence, 200 

Number visits made by Superintendent, 1 

Number visits made by Committee, 3 

PRIVATE SCHOOLS. 

Boys. Girls. 

Whole number enrolled during year, 960 1,101 2,061 

Average number belonging during year, 1,722 

Average daily attendance, 1,478 

Per cent, of attendance, 86 

The enrollment of pupils in the schools exceeds that of 
any other period in their history, notwithstanding the 
withdrawal of large numbers into parochial schools during 
the past few years. The whole number returned for the 
year was 5,853, an increase of 157 ; the average number 
belonging, 4,609, an increase of 389 ; the average daily 
attendance, 4,100, an increase of 175. The ratio of atten- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 7 

dance to average number belonging was but 89 per cent, , 
in comparison with 93 per cent, of the preceding year. 
This decrease in per cent, of attendance is largely attribu- 
table to the epidemic of la grippe in the months of 
January and February, and of measles in certain districts 
later in the year. 

The statistics for the private and parochial schools are 
furnished by the courtesy of those in charge of those 
various institutions in the city. Although the returns 
may not be accurate in all cases, especially in regard to 
the enrollment, they approximate closely, without doubt, 
the attendance upon those schools. 

COST OF INSTRUCTION PER SCHOLAR. 

It has been the custom in all previous Reports to give 
under this head the cost based upon the average number 
belonging to each school, and the amount expended for 
hire of teachers, for fuel, care of school houses, books, and 
supplies, except those furnished from the income of the 
Rowland fund, the term *'care of school houses" including 
only the salaries of janitors. I shall make that part of 
the Report as usual, but shall also give the cost, by 
departments, of each pupil, based on the average number 
belonging and the total sums expended for the mainte- 
nance of each department during the year. This last 
computation will be the basis upon which tuition of non- 
resident pupils will be collected. 

Table 1. This table is computed, as in former Reports, 
on the items classified above. 

The cost of maintenance of each scholar in the High school 
for the year has been $48.94 

Grammar schools : 

Fifth street, 24.63 

Middle street, 23.80 



8 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Pnrker street, «2a.0<i 

Thompson street, ll)..il» 

UarrinKton Training xchool, •JO.i'j 

Primary Rchools : 

AcushDet avenue, jS.iia 

Cedar »tr«et, \:i.ii 

Cedar Grove street, i(i,.-.2 

Dartmouth strcei, ai.2:t 

Fourth street, 14..1'i 

Grove, V2.W 

Ltudeii street, I7.H2 

MerrlmHC street, 111.80 

Maxfleld street, 19.^ 

ThoLii])Son street, ]4.7ii 

Willlnui treet, aO.ii 

Cannon vlllo, l)t.-t.1 

Country iiehuols : 

Aeushuet, a!i.!i7 

Clark's Poltit, .i-2,:i,i 

North, a).4;t 

Plalnville, Xt.-H 

Iio<:kdule, ]<l 71 

Hill schooU, 



Ceilur (irove street, it jij 

<VDrnil 2 moiilhs), ;_9,-, 

Fifth street, «,07 

Hetrlmao street, ■) a^ 

pHrker M reel ) j 73 

ISvenlDK drawing, UI.70 

The uvenice eoet of lualnteuHoce itt a 

<iniinmar sehool pupti, S2:i.H!) 

Primary Ruhuol pupil, I7.(H> 

Country sehool pupil, 2ri.s7 

Hill sehoo] pupil, -iSAKi 

EvcniaK ichool pupil, 7.^ij 

EvenlDK drawing school pupil, 1<.I.71< 



SCHOOL REPORT. 9 

Table 2. Tuition table, based on total expenditures for 
each department. 

Hi^h school, $50.63 

Grammar schools, 25.31 

Primary schools, 20.52 

Country schools, 29.07 

Mill schools, 30.97 

Evenio£: elementary schools, 9.07 

Evening drawing school, 23.97 

Average cost for a day school pupil, 924.63 

Average cost for an evening school pupil, including drawing 
school, 9.72 

EXPENDITURES. 
RECEiprs. 

Annual and special appropriations : 

For Teachers' salaries, $84,000.00 

Incidentals (including text-books and sup- 
plies), 32,000.00 

Repairs of buildings (including Da tmouth 
street furnishing; ventilation nt Fourth 
street; heating apparatus and plumbing 
at Merrimac street ; curbing school yard 
at Middle street), 8,750.00 $124,750.00 

PAYMENTS. 

For Teachers' salaries, $83,902.26 

Incidentals (including text-books and sup- 
plies), 31,287.39 

Repairs of buildings (including Dartmouth 
street furnishings ; ventilation at Fourth 
street; heating apparatus, plumbing, and 
heating apparatus at Merrimac street; 
curbing school yard at Middle street), 8,749.00 123,938.65 



Balance, 


DOG FUXD. 




$811.95 


Balance, January 1, 1890, 
Received, February, 1890, 
Expenditures, 




$2,026.78 
1,268.56 


$3,295.34 
656.10 


Balance, 
2 


$2,639.24 



lO SCHOOL REPORT. 

Received from uon-resldent pupils, $S17.49 

Received from sale of sundry articles, 20.75 $838.24 

The amount received for tuition of non-resident pupils, 
$817.49, and the amount received for books, etc., sold, 
$20.75, have been paid to the City Treasurer, and placed 
to the credit of unappropriated funds. There seems to 
be no valid reason why the money received each year by 
the school department for items as stated above, should be 
placed to the account of unappropriated funds, while other 
departments are credited with the amounts they receive 
from various sources, except the fact that a city ordinance 
so provides. 

The whole amount expended for the year 1890 ex- 
ceeded that for 1889 by $6,030.48, distributed as follows : 

Pay of teachers, $2,002.26 

Repairs, ventilation, and furnishings of new 
school house, 4,028.22 $6,030.48 

It is not because the salaries of teachers have been 
raised to any extent that the salary account appears larger. 
A few salaries only have been raised, notably in the High 
school. The increase is due to the employment of a few 
more teachers in the regular corps to care for the increase 
of the number of pupils. An examination of the schedule 
of teachers employed December 25, 1890, shows less 
names on the pay rolls than a year before ; but owung to 
the fact that more regular and less special teachers are 
employed, the aggregate of the pay-roll is larger. 

The other large item of increased expenditure is the 
repair account. This has been caused by the attempt of 
the Committee to improve the heating and ventilating in 
several school houses, and in furnishing new^ rooms 
opened during the year. The ordinary expenditures in 
this account have not been much larger than usual. 

It is evident that the sum total of expenditures in the 
city for school purposes must increase from year to year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. II 

if the school population grows, even if other conditions 
remain the same. But the latter is not a fixed quantity. 
The state is continually enacting statutes which add to 
school expenses, — for example, the recent laws relating to 
ventilation and compulsory attendance in day and evening 
schools. 

New Bedford does not pay extremely high salaries to 
her teachers. In fact, the rate of wages in the elementary 
schools here are lower than those of many New England 
cities of her wealth. The average cost per pupil is less 
than many cities that offer no higher advantages in their 
schools. By the state report of last year New Bedford 
ranks 211 in a list of 351 cities and towns in relation to 
the percentage of taxable property appropriated for school 
purposes. 

A wise administration of any kind of business is not 
usually a niggardly one. A true economy consists in a 
judicious outlay that brings adequate returns. It is the 
prerogative of the children who attend the schools that 
they shall be provided with healthful surroundings and 
such as shall in some measure stimulate their sense of the 
true and beautiful ; that they shall be provided with such 
instruction as will develop their latent powers in a 
manner to fit them to cope successfully with the world 
under its present conditions. That this may be accom- 
plished, buildings properly situated, suitably lighted, 
heated, ventilated, and furnished are required ; able teach- 
ers also must be employed, and such can be had and 
retained only by paying good salaries. 

The cost of educating a child in the schools to-day is 
greater than it was even twenty years ago. It is fitting 
that it should be so. The world is demanding more of 
people in every sphere of life than ever before, and the 
schools are trying to meet this demand. The school de- 
partment is administered, however, with the same careful 
oversight that has always distinguished it. 



12 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



SYLVIA ANN HOWLAND EDUCATIONAL FUND. 



Balance of income on hand, Jan. 1, 1890, 
Interest for the year, 



'1^ 



Total creilit, 
ExpenditurcA for the year, 

Bahince on hand, Jan. 1, 1891, 

Oo{«t of books and supplies during the year 1890, 
Cost of books and supplies in stock, January 1, 
1890, 

Co^t of books and supplies charged to schools, 

1890, 
Cost of books and supplies in stock, January 1, 

1891, 

Disbursements to the several schools 
as follows : 

High school. 

Fifth street grammar school. 
Middle " '' " 

Parker '' " " 

Thompson street grammar school, 
Harrington Training school, 



$1,408.14 
3,000.00 

•4,408.14 
4,013. '5 

8394.30 



$4,013.75 



Thompson street prir 


[lary school, 


TJndeii ** ' 


% (( 


Merrimac '* * 


k (( 


Maxfteld " * 


( (( 


Cedar " 


( (i 


Acushnet avenue * 


( ik 


William street ' 


( kk 


Fourth *' 


( fck 


Dartmouth street ' 


k k( 


Grove * 


( (» 


Cedar Grove street ' 


( (( 


Cannonville ' 


( fc( 


Acushnet 


(( 


North 


fc( 


Clark's Point 


fc( 


Rockdale 


(( 


Plainvillc 


(( 


North mill 


t; 


South '' 


k( 


Farm 


(( 



08.2:^ $4,111.98 

$3,997.77 

114.21 $4,111.98 

and otherwise are 



$354.36 

418.33 

297.79 

601.17 

226.01 

633.79 

70.27 

35.91 

48.04 

30.79 

46.66 

36.81 

42.93 

62.74 

58.06 

10.13 

57.60 

47.66 

187.89 

29.41 

48.03 

52.47 

37.02 

2.87 

8.81 

5.81 



SCHOOL REPORT. 13 

Express and freight, $60.71 
Periodicals, 53.81 

Pedagogical library, 48.85 

Coverinjr books, 120.26 

Care of musical instruments, 236.25 
Sewing materials, 6.14 

Object supplies, 20.39 

Stock on hand, January 1, 1891, 114.21 $4,111.98 



The appropriations from the income of this fund have 
been applied to the same general purposes as in previous 
years. There have been some extraordinary expenses, 
however, which have reduced the balance to be carried to 
another year to a smaller figure than usual. These un- 
usual expenses consisted in the amount paid for a grand 
piano for the Harrington Training school, and the amounts 
paid for furnishing several rooms opened during the year 
with wall maps, globes, and similar apparatus. 

An important change was made during the year in re- 
lation to the supplementary reading, which is purchased 
entirely from this fund. Lists of books suitable for such 
reading were prepared by the Superintendent and com- 
mittees appointed from the teachers. These lists were 
presented to the sub-comipittees of the School Committee 
having the departments in charge, and were approved by 
them. All books for supplementary reading must now be 
selected from these lists, and thereby a better class of 
books is being placed in the schools than formerly. 

The Howland fund is of incalculable benefit to our 
schools. Illustrative apparatus, reference books, and a 
variet)' of reading matter through its agency are placed at 
the disposal of the teachers, enabling them to give life 
and vigor to their instruction, and to broaden its scope. 
It is also used to supply the schools with pictures for the 
walls, musical instruments, and other things whereby the 
aesthetic tastes are cultivated. If the curriculum should 



14 SCHOOL REPORT. 

be extended so as to include any other forms of manual 
training than are now attached to it, or to include scien- 
tific physical training for the pupils, this fund will afford 
peculiar advantages by w^hich such additional instruction 
may be made successful. 

DETAILED STATEMENT. 

OUTLAY BY THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE FROM THE INCOME 
OF THE SYLVIA ANN HOWLAND FUND, FROM .TANUARY 
1, 1890, TO JANUARY 1, 1891. 

BOOKS AND PERIODICALS. 

American Book Company, 8206.25 

Appleton, D. & Co., 2.;^ 

Boston School Supplj' Co., 80.44 

Bradley, Milton & Co., 2.86 

Barnes, A. S. & Co., 1.87 

Bay State Pub. Co., 1.60 

Educational Pub. Co., 124.75 

Educator, The, 3.00 

Faunce, Charles L., 6.00 

Ginn & Company, 187.47 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., 651.23 

Heath, D. C. & Co., 228.46 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 20.57 

Harper & Bros., 3.24 

Kello^fg, E. L. & Co., 28.50 

Kuowlton, D. H. A Co., 6.00 

Lee & Shepard, \(\SA9 

Lippineott, J. B. & Co., 20.90 

T^ach, Shewell & Sanborn, 3.67 

Mason, Perry A Co., 131.09 

New P:ngland Publishing Co., 7.50 

School Herald Publishing Co., 26.50 

Small, Willard, 16.88 

Silver, Burdett & Co., 13.54 

Stockin, A. C, 3.89 

Schoenliof, Carl, 7.84 

University Publishing Co., 24.63 

Wakefield, N. S. & Co., 6.75 

Ware, Wm. & Co., 8.00 $1,995.30 



SCHOOL REPORT. I5 
PEDAGOGICAL LIBRARY. 

Appleton, D. A Co., $1.10 

Educational Publishing Co., 1.50 

Ginn & Company, .63 

Lee & Shepard. 1 .82 

Maynard, Efflnf^ham & Company, .84 

Small, Willard, 42.96 $48.85 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

Boden, E., Jr., piano, $475.00 

Dit»on, Oliver & Company, pitch pipes, 25.03 

Peii-ce, George, care of organs and pianos, 236.25 

Silver, Burdett & Co., music books, 112.53 848.81 

DRAWING DEPARTMENT. 

Bradley, Milton & Co., drawing paper, $7.20 

Hayes, N. P., scissors, 5.00 

Prang Educational Co., drawing models, 22.00 

Ferry, George S., drawing models, scissors, 25.00 59.20 

SEWING DEPARTMENT. 

Bliss & Nye, hamper, $2.75 

Haslsell & Tripp, sewing materials, 6.14 8.89 

BINDING AND COVERING BOOKS. 

Bates, Olivia, covering books, $21.45 

Holden Book Cover Co., book covers, 34.72 

Hatch, William £., cash paid for covering books, 2.40 

Kane, D. J. & Bro., binding books, 66.90 

Law ton, I^uise, covering books, 19.60 

Merrick, Emma J., covering books, 21.45 

Ferry, George S., covering paper and mucilage, 82.75 

Potter, Frances, covering books, 2.15 

Taber, Alice, covering books, 7.30 258.72 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Anthony. £. & Sons, reward cards, $5.00 

Boston School Supply Co., Grub^ cards, 14.00 

Bliss A Nye, stone Jars, 2.25 



l6 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Bradley, Milton & Co., object supplies, 811 .12 

Dews, Edwin, language pictures, 2.00 

Educational Pub. Co., object supplies, .80 

Hainuiett, J. L., object supplies, b(\.l\) 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., twine, 1.75 

llaskins, E. P., repairing chart, .25 

Perry, Geo. S., object supplies, 32.08 

Tompkins, I. B., Jr., object supplies, 2.15 $128.19 

CYCLOSTYLE SUPPLIES. 

George 11. Klchter, 25 5.'l 

APPARATUS. 

Adams, Charles F., camera, views, and frame, 831.45 

Bliss, George H., apparatus, 2.10 

Donham, E. F. B., stencils, 1.00 

Etmer & Amend, chemical apparatus, .70 

Ginn & Company, globes, 41.20 

Haskins, E. P., fractional frames, 15.00 

Hummett, J. L., globe, 0.00 

Pierce & Sowle, cotton line, .10 

Richter, George H. & Co., neostyles, .'»4.40 

Ritchie, E. S. A Sons, physical apparatus, 10.04 

Richards. George D., measures, 0.15 

Roberts & Fellows, camera slides, 1J).20 

Sullings, Kingman & Co., supplies, 0.55 

Sherman, C. R. & Sons, supplies, 1.80 11)9.89 

EXPRESS AN1> FREIGHT. 

Gardner, T. M., 818.10 

Gr.iy, Charles A., 0.70 

Hatch & Co., 31.10 

O. C. R. R. Co., 1.70 

U. S. Express Co., 2.55 00.21 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Boston School Supply Co., cliarts and easels, 825.00 

Bay State Publishing Co., reference maps, 50.00 

Barnes, A. S. & Co., map drawing blanks, .39 

Heath, D. C. & Co., outline maps, 22.58 

Hayes, N. P., scissors, 3.50 



SCHOOL REPORT. I*] 

Kellogg, £. L. & Co., map stencils, 81.20 
Lambard, Anna M., pictures, 3.38 

McFarliD, James, moving piano, 6.00 

Prang Educational Co., historical charts, 7.60 

Pierce & Bushnell, framing pictures, 12.97 

Silver, Burdett A Co., maps, 95.70 

Western Publishing Co., geographical charts, 145.84 #380.16 



84,013.75 

TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

STATEMENT. 

0>sx of books and supplies purchased during 1890, 84,651.20 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, January 1, 1890, 778.64 85,429.84 

Cost of books and supplies charged to schools in 

1890, 84,195.36 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, January 1, 1891, 1,226.05 

Cash receipts from sale of books and supplies, 8.43 85,429.84 

The cost of books and supplies furnished the several 
schools in detail for the year 1890 is as follows : 

Bookri. Supplies. 

Highsc*hool, 8211.86 8390.31 

Fifth street t^ramniar school, 220.93 266.66 

Middle street " '' 252.35 186.36 

Parker street '* '' 4(^4.20 214.41 

Thompson St. '' " 211.18 1(K).29 

Harrington Training ** 112.25 103.48 

Acushnet avenue primary school, 35.62 69.15 

Cedar street " " 20.95 48.30 

Cedar Grove street " ** 12.92 .51.58 

Cannon ville '* '* 13.31 15.42 

Dartmouth street " " 36.03 65.51 

Fourth street ** " 13.17 05.12 

Grove '' " 19.98 31.87 



(( 




(( 




«i 




(i 




k( 




ki 




(k 




(i 




(( 




kk 




(( 









Linden street '' " 27.48 25.85 

Merrimae street " *' 6.80 35.14 

Maxfield street " '' 7.80 41.'20 

Thompson street " '' 17.80 47.45 

William street " »' 5.59 37.46 

North mill " 15.79 11.40 

3 



l8 SCHOOL REPORT. 



South mill 




school, 


Acushnet 




a 


Clark's Point 




i% 


North 




fck 


Plainville 




44 


Rockdale 




i( 


Cedar Grove street 


evening " 


Parker street 




(( (i 


Fifth street 




44 (4 


Merriinac street 




44 44 


Central 




44 4» 


Evening drawing 




4k 


Farm 




44 


OHlee Superintendent 


of Schools, 



$15.57 


$9.79 


52.00 


27.02 


20.21 


13.41 


25.40 


11.03 


10.07 . 


7.70 


25.31 


29.76 


38.97 


23.72 


18.S2 


10.35 


42.17 


8.95 


3.75 


4.70 


2.43 


1.34 




258.9(» 


.73 


12..31 


8.32 


9.60 



$1,969.76 $2,225.60 

The average cost per pupil in the different departments 
of the schools for books and supplies has been as follows : 

High school, $1.81 

(Grammar schools, 1.30 

Primary schools, .39 

Country schools, 1.08 

Mill schools, .69 

Average for day schools, .816 

'* evening elementary schools, .17 

'^ evening drawing schools, 4.04 

While many states are still wrestling with the ''free text- 
book question,'' in Massachusetts there seems to be a feel- 
ing which is well nigh universal that it has proven bene- 
ficial to the schools to have the books and supplies furnished 
free to the pupils. 

With no restriction placed upon the teachers as to sup- 
plies, except the general one that there shall be no waste, 
the cost of books and supplies during the past year aver- 
ages but $0.81 per pupil ; in the evening elementary 
schools, $0.17. The large cost per pupil in the evening 
drawing school, $4.04, was due to the purchase of a num- 
ber of sets of fine drawing instruments. These will last 
many years, and this fact should be considered in estimating 



SCHOOL REPORT. I9 

the cost ; also the fact that the sum total expended for this 

« 

school was not large, although the rate per pupil is, as the 
cost is figured on a small number of pupils. 

While it is true that the application of the *' free text- 
book law" has been successful in Massachusetts, it is es- 
pecially true in respect to the following : 1. The economy 
of cost, that is, the low cost per pupil at which the cities 
and towns are able to furnish the books and supplies to 
the pupils compared with what it formerly cost the parents. 
2. The economy of time which comes from the schools 
being supplied promptly with the materials for work. New 
Bedford, however, does not furnish a fair example of the 
working of the law. By having the Howland fund to draw 
upon we are enabled to be very generous in the matter of 
books and supplies and yet keep the cost of those furnished 
from the regular appropriation down to a low figure. 

Admitting that the law is successful in its operation does 
not alTect the principle that is involved. The tendency 
towards paternal legislation on the part of the state has its 
dangers. The claim that was made by the friends of the 
*'free text-book law," when advocating its passage, that 
the pupils would take better care of the books as property 
of the city than as the property of their own, has not 
proven true. They seem to take it as a matter of course 
that books and supplies should be furnished free. It is 
only by constant watchfulness on the part of the teachers 
and the other school authorities that serious loss is prevent- 
ed. Parents should impress upon their children their duty 
in caring for all school property, and should cooperate 
most heartily with the school authorities in their eflbrts to 
preserve it. 

Respectfully submitted for the several committees. 

WM. E. HATCH, 

Secretary. 



20 SCHOOL REPORT. 



In School Committee, 

December 29, 1890. 
Oil motion of Capt. Howland : 

Voted unanimousli/^ That the thanks of this Board be and are hereby 
tendered to His Honor, Mayor Walter Clifford, for the dignity, urbanity, 
and impartiality that has ever characterizeil his acts as chairman of 
this Committee. In vacating the chair that he has so honorably fiUed, 
this (*ommittee begs to assure him that its best wishes go with him, and 
it trusts that all his future endeavors may be crowned with success. 

On motion of Mr. Washburn : 

Voted unanimously^ That the thanks of this Board are hereby ten- 
dered to Mr. Pitman, the Vice-Chairman of this Committee, for the 
faithful, courteous, and efficient manner in which he has performed the 
duties of his office. 

On motion of Mr. Hillman : 

Voted unanimously^ That the thanks of this Committee are hereby 
tendered the Secretary for the efficient and agreeable manner in which 
he has performed the duties of his office. 

On motion of Mr. Tompkins : 

Voted unanimously, That we desire to express our regret that we are 
to lose the services of so many old members, men who have been con- 
spicuous for their faithful labor, and whose uniform courtesy and 
kindness has endeared them to us. We wish them in their retirement 
that rest that comes from a consciousness of having carefully performed 
the tasks that were imposed upon them. 

The retiring members were Messrs. Washburn, El- 
dridge, Hillman, and Haskins. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 21 

NEW BEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

EXERCISES, JUNE 27, 1890. 

PRAYER. 

1. SONG, '*The Watch by the Rhine." {Carl Wilhelm.) 

2. SALUTA TORY ADDRESS, William H. Atwood. 

3. BOURNE PRIZE ESSAY, "The Tournament," Harriet N. Hyatt. 

MUSIC. 

4. PART SOXG, FOR Female Voices, *' Loveliest Violet." 

{Carl Beinecke,) 

5. ORATION. "Lincoln at Gettysburg," Andrew M. Bush, Jr. 

6. CLASS HISTORY, Annie C. Ricketson. 

MUSIC. 

7. CHORUS, " Hark the Vesper Hymn." (Sir John Stephenson,) 

8. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS, by his Honor, Mayor Clifford. 

MUSIC. 

9. PARTING SONG, Class of «0. 

10. VALEDICTORY ADDRESS, " Substance versus Shadow," 

Lottie M. Allen. 

PARTING SONG. 

Words by Helen L. Bonney. Mrsic by George W. Needham. 

Time, on thy pinions light speeding. 

Winging along thy swift flight. 
Thou, who thy children art leading, 

Bid'«t us leave school days so bright. 
School ties we now sadly sever, 
I-.eHve scenes familiar forever, 
Yet we'll forget them, ah ! never ; 

Memory will hold them for aye. 



22 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Passing one more of life's stages, 
Close we the book of the past ; 

l^irning to fair open pages, 
Bound in a future so vast. 

Both from its gladness and sorrow, 

Strength for life's task we may borrow ; 

Making the joy of to-morrow 
Illumine the gloom of to-day. 

God's hand forever is guiding 
Through light and shadowy ways: 

May His sweet presence abiding. 
Bless all our dim future days. 

Forth into life we are going ; 

Hope's star before us is glowing, 

On us true courage bestowing. 
Yet '90 sings sadly *' Farewell." 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



23 



GRADUATES. 



No steps backward. 



Arthur Stone Aahlej', 
William Henry Atwood, 
Everett Clifton Brennand, 
Andrew Marcellus Busb, Jr., 
Charles Marshall Cunlifte, 
William Frederick Dammon, 
Charles Prescott Emerson. 
Daniel Taber llillman, 
Leonard Clifton Lapham, 
Harry Topham Maeomber, 
.lames Stowe Maeomber, 
George William Needham, 
(ieorge Everett Noble, 
Thomas Joseph Rogers, 
Frederick Slocum, 
IvOttie May Allen, 
Kate Josepha Bartlett, 
Irene May hew Bassetr, 
•Jennie Clarke Bates, 
tora Moulton Benjamin, 
Helen Lucretia Bonney, 
Uuk Maria Briggs, 
<irace Allen Caswell, 
Annabel le Chubbuck, 
Harriet Love Cornell, 
Hattie Seabury Davis, 
Ethel Washburn Denham, 
I>ora Amanda DeWolf, 
Florence Ella Forbes, 

Carrie 



Julia Crocker Gifford, 
Lillie Ann Heap, 
Elizabeth HeppenstalL 
Helen Curtis Hervey, 
Berta Naomi Holcomb, 
Blanche Russell Howland, 
Julia Arnold Hunt, 
Harriet Newton Hyatt, 
Sarah Elizabeth Kelley, 
Isadore Brown Lee, 
Martha Jane Lee, 
Ida May Lewis, 
Sadie Lowe, 
Annie Clapp Milliken, 
Caroline Bradford Nye, 
Helen Augusta Parker, 
Rosalie Parlow, 
May Annette Parsons, 
Ruth Emma Pease, 
Julia Mason Pilling, 
Medora Livingstone Poole, 
Alice Maria Purrington, 
Bertha Dic^kinson Reed, 
Anna Collins Ricketsou, 
Fannie Matthews Spooner, 
May Eleventh Stetson, 
Edna Foster Tobey, 
Gertie Evelyn Tripp, 
Ruth May Tripp, 
Frances Washburn. 



RECIPIENTS OF CERTIFICATES. 



Alice Gertrude Anthony, 



Gertrude Alice Smith. 



22 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Passing one more of life's stages, 
Close we the book of the past ; 

Turning to fair open pages, 
Bound in a future so vast. 

Both from its gladness and sorrow, 

Strength for life's task we may borrow ; 

Making the joy of to-morrow 
Illumine the gloom of to-day. 

God's hand forever is guiding 
Through light and shadowy ways; 

May His sweet presence abiding, 
Bless all our dim future days. 

Forth into life we are going ; 

Hope's star before us is glowing, 

On us true courage bestowing. 
Yet '90 sings sadly *' Farewell." 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



23 



GRADUATES. 



No steps backward. 



Arthur Stone Ashlej', 
William Henry Atwood, 
Everett Clifton Brennand, 
Andrew Marcellus Bush, Jr., 
Charles Marshal 1 Cunlifte, 
William Frederick Dammon, 
Charlpj* Prescott Eraerson. 
iMniel Taber llillman, 
Leonard ("Jlifton Lapham, 
Uarry Topham Maeomber, 
James Stowe Maeomber, 
George William Needhaiu, 
(leorge Everett Noble, 
Thomas Joseph Rogers, 
Frederick Slocum, 
Utie May Allen, 
Kate Josepha Bartlett, 
Irene May hew Bassett, 
•Jennie Clarke Bates, 
Laura Moulton Benjamin, 
Helen Lueretia Bonney, 
Lizzie Maria Briggs, 
Graee Allen Caswell, 
Annabelle Chubbuok, 
Harriet Love Cornell, 
Hattie Seabury Davis, 
Ethel Washburn Denham, 
Dora Amanda DeWolf, 
Florence Ella Forbes, 

(.'arrie 



Julia Crocker Gifford, 
Lillie Ann Heap, 
Elizabeth Heppenstall, 
Helen C'urtis Hervey, 
Berta Naomi Holcomb, 
Blanche Kussell Rowland, 
Julia Arnold Hunt, 
Harriet Xewton Hyatt, 
Sarah Elizabeth Kelley, 
Isadore Brown Lee, 
Martha Jane Lee, 
Ida May Lewis, 
Sadie Lowe, 
Annie Clapp Milliken, 
Caroline Bradford Nye, 
Helen Augusta Parker, 
Rosalie Parlow, 
May Annette Parsons, 
Ruth Emma Pease, 
Julia Mason Pilling, 
Medora Livingstone Poole, 
Alice Maria Purrington, 
Bertha Dicrkinson Reed, 
Anna Collins Ricketsou, 
Fannie Matthews Spoouer, 
May Eleventh Stetson, 
Edna Foster Tobey, 
Gertie Evelyn Tripp, 
Ruth May Tripp, 
Frances Washburn. 



RECIPIENTS OF CERTIFK ATES. 



Alice Gertrude Anthony, 



Gertrude Alice Smith. 



24 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



NEW BEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



KATES OF TUITION FOR NON-RESIDKNT PUPILS, 185)1. 



■ 


First 


Second 


Third ' 


For the 




Term. 


Term. 


Term. 


Year. 


IlifCh school, 


i 817.71 


$12.G7 


820.25 


S50.G3 


Grammar pchools, 


8.85 


0.33 


10.13 


25.31 


Primary schools, 
Ungracfed school?, 


7.18 


5.14 


8.20 


20.52 


1 10.17 


7.29 


11.61 


29.07 


Evening drawing school. 


1 


1 




23.07 



Tuition is payable in advance either at the office of the 
Superintendent of Schools, or at the schools where the 
pupils attend. All bills will be sent from the office of the 
Superintendent of Schools. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 25 



RULES GOVERNING TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

The maximum salaries for the various grades are as 
follows : 

Principals of grammar schools, $1,800 to 82,000 

'' primary " 600 

Assistants in grammar schools, 550 

" primary " 500 

The salary of a Primary School Principal of a four- 
room building is $550 per year, which is increased at the 
rate of twenty-five dollars for each additional room. The 
salaries of assistant teachers in the grammar and primary 
grades are increased at the rate of twenty-five dollars per 
year until the maximum salary is reached. 

Higii school Principal, |s'2,750 

" " Sub-Master, 1,600 

** *' Teacher of Sciences, 1,500 

'" " Lady Assistants, 900 

Training school Principal, 1,300 

'* " Assistant, 700 

Ungraded schools, 400 to 700 

Supervisor of Drawing in primary and grammar schools, 1,200 

Teacher of Drawing in High school. 550 

Supervisor of Music, 1,700 

Teacher of Sewing, 525 

Assistants, 270 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



BHIEh' pESCRIPl'ION OF THE St^HOOL HOUSES, WITH THEIK 
ACCOMMODATIONS AND CONDITIONS. 







" 


i 


1 


'■ 1 
I 


BCHOUI^. 




^ 1 


S CONDITHIN. 




a 


S 3 


1 1 
■s ■s 




i 1 






S I. 


6 1 6 


8 O 


1 lAouBhnet aveoup, 


Brtck, :{ 


1! 


313 Good. 




Acunhnet, 


Wood, 2 


;t . 


lUNew. 




Cedar street, 


Wood, -1 




221 (Jood. 




Cedar Grove street. 


Briek, a 


s 


298 Good. 




CanDonvllle, 


Wood, 1 


2 


68 Fair. 




Cliirlt'8 Point, 


Wood, 1 




30 Fair. 




Dartinoiilh *trfpt. 


Wood, a 


(1 ' 


287 Sew. 




Kifih street. 


Hrkk, 3 


10 


1 4gOGood. 




Fourth Ktreet, 


Wood, I a 


G 


2(iO Fair. 




Farm, 


Wood. I 1 




Fair. 




Urove, 


Wood, , 2 


'1 




19G Poor. 




High Bchoi)l, 


Brick, 3 


9 


7 


1 ':M3Good. 




IIurriDXton Memorial, 


Brick. ' 3 


8 




1 .-(85 New. 




High Billet, 


Wood, , a 


a 




Old aDd poor; 
1 not used. 

Old and poor; 




K^m|itoii street. 


Wood, a 


4 












not used. 




LlndsD street, 


Wood, 2 


4 1 


200 Old and fair. 




Middle street, 


Brick, .1 


9 




I art! Good. 




Merriniuc street. 


Brlek, 2 


6 




IS4 Good. 




MH:(fleld street. 


Brick, i 


U 




l203 Good. 




North, 


Wood. 1 


1 




42 Good. 




Parker street. 


Brick, a 


ta 




1 |63GOood. 


'^ 


Plainvllle, 


Wood, 1 






' 28 Fair. 


•J3 


Rockdale, 


Wood, 1 


i 




1 55 Fair. 


^ 


Thompeoa street. 


Brick, 3 


11 




483 New. 


■2& 


WHIiam street. 


Wood, 2 


4 




171 Old and poor. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



r < I 
5 s ! 



I| tioi«)n»]«j 


|g||2|SSS"R?'"SS3S^=""- - 


2 


! .■,*S?.u'!.« 


3SSSS§2'-2»SS S5S3S22 -"»2». | |j 


\ umiL 


aS3ESS*3a-'"i = "^2*2*='"^=«*'5^ 


1 


1 J ibjoAjoj 


3iS22|S!gS25S — SSS 3~"" -" 
g§333asS2SS£3SSK823''-2S» 


"1 

1 

1 


i| 8*"D-os 






r" ..«m"iu.i 


g|tPPiliSS|iH|g8=^23i3" 


1 


Ij -«-3.<.s 






■wnasqv 


3,301 
11,818 
12,025 
17,430 
, 7,349 
15,500 
13.860 
9,370 
10.066 
3,915 
8,719 
11,920 
12,170 
3.983 
B.139 
7,820 
13,117 
6,052 

1,009 
2,551 
1,087 
2,310 
2,4«6. 


1 


i: .„..,.«,, 


gii5S£Kgg3l8SgsSSE3S3SgSSS3 


1 


1 ,0-1083 MJ 




|l -aanepnaiiv 

[ .t|i.a *8ujAv 




1 


i -3D,iuoi>a 


iiiiii^iPi^3S2iii=^tsi^s3 


1 


■ iiojna imj, 


mmMiHrn^nun^^^^^r 1 


i ! 

X 


iill ll|| illlllllpPfl 

-"*'* = -" = 2 = = 23S2t:22asS53Si 


i 

E 



28 SCHOOL REPORT. 



CALENDAR, 1891. 

Winter term begins January 5, 1891 ; ends April 10, 1891. 
Summer term begins April 20, 1891 ; ends June 26, 1891. 
Fall term begins September 8, 1891 ; ends December 24, 
1891. 

VACATIONS. 

April 11, 1891, to April 19, 1891, inclusive. 
June 27, 1891, to September 7, 1891, inclusive. 
From Wednesday noon before Thanksgiving, the re- 
mainder of the week. 

December 25, 1891, to January 11, 1892. 

HOLIDAYS. 

Every Saturday : Washington's Birthday, or the day 
following when that occurs on Sunday ; Memorial Day ; 
Labor Day ; all National and State Fast Days. 

SCHOOL SESSIONS. 

From March 1, to November 1, 9 a. m. to 11.30 a. m., 
and 2 p. m. to 4 p. m., in the grammar schools. 9 a. m. 
to 12 M., and 2 p. m. to 4 p. m., in the primary schools. 
From November 1 to March 1, the afternoon sessions in 
the grammar and primary schools are from 1.30 o'clock 
to 3.30 o'clock. 

High school sessions are from 8.30 a. m. to 1.30 p. m., 
throughout the year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 29 

SCHOOL BOARD — 1890. 

WALTER CLIFFORD, Mayor, Chairman, exH>ffieio. 

WILLIAM H. PITMAN, VIce-Chairman. 

WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 

WILLIAM A. TUCKER, President of Common Council, ex-officio. 



Ward 1- Anna R. Borden, John H. Lowe, George W. Hill man. 

Wakd 2— Thomas Mack, Isaac B. Tompkins, Jr., Elmore P. Haskins. 

Wakd 3— Isaac W. Benjamin, Helen W. Webster, William H. Pitman. 

Waki> 4 — George H. Dunbar, George H. Batchelor, John Eldrldge, Jr. 

Ward .5 — Fred A. Bradford, Jonathan Howland, Jr., Frederic A. 
Washburn. 

Ward 6 — lliomas Donaghy, Jr., Betsey B. Winslow, Francis M. 
Kennedy. 

STANDING COMMiriEES. 

William E. Hatch, Secretary. 

Ox High School— Eldridge. Washburn, Howland, Dunbar, Benja- 
min, Mi»s Winslow, Mrs. Webster, Mrs. Borden. 

Ox Grammar Schools — Tompkins, Washburu, Pitman, Howland, 
Mrs. Webster. Haskins, Mrs. Borden, Bradford. 

Ox Primary Schools— Benjamin, Pitman, Tompkins, Dunbar, Miss 
Winslow, Mi*8. Borden, Kennedy, Batchelor. 

On Couxtry Schools— Haskins, Hillman, Kennedy, Lowe, Donaghy, 
Mack. 

Ox Trainixg School— Dunbar, Pitman, Tompkins, Benjamin, 
Eldridge, Washburn, Kennedy. 

Ox Farm School — Kennedy, Washburn, Haskins, Hillman, Donaghy, 
Bmdford. 

Ox Mill Schools— Mrs. Borden, Howland, Hillman, Mrs. Webster, 
Lowe, Bradford, Donaghy. 

On E vexing Schools— Hillman, Haskins, Kennedy, Lowe, Batchelor, 
Mack, Donaghy. 

Ox Music— Washburn, Pitman, Haskins, Bradford, Batchelor. 

Ox Drawing— Mrs. Webster, Eldridge, Donaghy, Dunbar, Mack, 
lA)vve. Miss Winslow. 

Ox Sewing — Miss Winslow, Mrs. Webster, Mrs. Borden, Batchelor. 

Ox Examination of Teachers- Eldridge, Dunbar, Tompkins, Benj- 
»uiiu, Washburn, Haskins, Hillman, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Mrs. 
Webster. 

Ox Text-Books— Pitman, Wash burn, Hillman, Mrs. Borden, Kennedy, 
Batchelor, Mack. 

On Expenditures — Flowland, Benjamin, Pitman, Tompkins, Eldridge, 
Dunbar, Haskins, Lowe, Tucker. 

On Howland Fund— Howland, Benjamin, Eldridge, Tompkins, Dun- 
bar, Kennedy, Bradford, Tucker. 

On Pay-Rolls— Tompkins, Howland, Mack. 



30 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



SCHOOL BOARD — 1891 



CHARLES S. ASHLF.V, Mayor, Chairman, eji>-officio. 



WILLIAM H. PITMAN, Viee-<.^hairman. 



WILLLVM E. HATCH, Sec etary and Superintendent. 

Office, 133 William Street. 
Office Hours, 8i to 9 A. M., 12i to 1 r. M. Satunlajtt, to »4 a. M. 



JOSEPH DAWSON, President of Common Council, ex-officio, 
Regalar Meetings of the Board, first Monday of each month, at 7.30 f. m. 



yame. 
ELIZABETH W. STANTON, 
ANNA R. BORDEN, 
JOHN H. LOWE, 



FRANK A. MILLIKEN, 

THOMAS MACK, 

ISAAC B. TOMPKINS, JR., 



WILLIAM H. PITMAN, 
ISAAC W. BENJAMIN, 
HELEN W. WEBSTER, 



SETH W. GODFREY, 
GEORGE H. DUNBAR, 
GEORGE H. BATCHELOR, 



WILLIAM L. SAYER, 
FRED. A. BRADFORD, 
JONATHAN HOWLAND. JR. 



FRANCIS M. KENNEDY, 
THOMAS DONAGHY, JR., 
BETSEV B. WINSLOW, 



WARD ONE. 
Place of ButinfJ(8. 

926 Acufrhn^t avenue, 

WARD TWO. 

43 William 8tn>et, 
20 Bedford street, 
78 Union street, 

WARD THREE. 

Five Cents Savings Bank, 
N. B. Col-Mage Co.'s office. 
Ill Fourth street, 

WARD FOUR. 



Institution for Savings, 

WARD FIVE. 

Mercury office, 
Journal office, 

WARD SIX. 

Eddy Building, 
CA Union street, 



Retidence. 
.M t. Pleasant. 
Ashland, cor. Austin st. 
931 Acushnet avenue. 



290 Pleasant street. 
248 Cedar street. 
691 County street. 



60 Chestnut street. 
50 Hill street. 
Ill Fourth street. 



17 Bethel street. 
179 William htrect. 
187 Cottage strt»et. 



76 So Sixth street. 
342 Union street. 
M Russell street. 



139 Acushnet avenue . 
103 Acushnet avenue. 
315 (-(»untv street. 



EMMA M. ALMY, Superint«n«ient's Clerk. 



HENRY SMITH, Truant Officer, 372 Cottage Btreet. 

Office Hours, 12^ to 1 p. M. Saturdays, 9 to 9^ a. m. 
GEORGE K. DA MM ON, Assistant Truant Officer. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 3 1 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 



William E. Hatch, Secretary. 

On Hioh School — Dunbar, Howland, BenJamiD, Miss Winslow, Mrs. 
Webster, Mrs. Borden, Mrs. Stanton, Pitman, Tompkins. 

Ox Grammar Schools— Tom pltins. Pitman, Howland, Mrs. Webster, 
Bradford, Mrs. Borden, Lowe, Sayer, Milliken. 

On Primary* Schools— Benjamin, Pitman, Tompkins, Dunbar, Miss 
, Winslow, Mrs. Stanton, Kennedy, Batchclor. 

On Country Schools — Lowe, Donaghy, Mack, Batchelor, Mi-s. Stan- 
ton, Godfrey. 

On Training; School — Pitman, Mrs. Stanton, Kennedy, Mrs. Borden, 
Batchelor, Milliken, Sayer. 

On Farm School — Donaghy, Kennedy, Bradford, Godfrey, Sayer, 
Milliken. 

On Mill Sch(>ols — Mrs. Borden, Howland, Lowe, Donaghy, Mrs. 
Webster, Bradford, Godfrey. 

On Evening Schools — Kennedy, Lowe, Mack, Donnghy, Batchelor, 
Godfrey, Milliken. 

On Musiic — Bradford, Pitman, Batchelor, Saj'er, Milliken, Godfrey. 

On Drawing— Mrs. Webster, Miss Winslow, Donaghy, Dunbar, 
Mack, Godfrey, S.iyer. 

On Sewing — Miss Winslow, Mrs. Webster, Mrs. Borden, Mrs. Stan- 
tun. 

On Examination of Teachers— Dunbar, Tompkins, Lowe, Donaghy, 
Kennedy, Mrs. Webster, Benjamin, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Brad- 
ford, Mrs. Stanton. 

On Text-Books — Pitman, Kennedy. Mack, Batchelor, Milliken, Sayer. 

On Expenditures — Howland, Benjamin, Tompkins, Pitman, Brad- 
ford, Mack, Lowe, Donaghy, Dawson. 

On Howland Fund — Howland, Benjamin, Tompkins, Dunbar, Pit- 
man, Bradford, Kennedy, Dawson. 

On Pay-Rolls — Tompkins, Howland, Mack. • 



32 SCHOOL REPORT. 



%n ^emoriaiu. 



One member of the Board was removed by death during 
the year, — Mrs. Etta F. Martin, a member from ward 
four. Mrs. Martin had served but a few months on the 
Board, but had long been known to its members as a sin- 
cere and consistent friend of the public schools. 

Mr. Eldridge, a member of the Board from the same 
ward, reported to the Board the death of his colleague. 
A committee was appointed to represent the Board at the 
funeral, and another to draft resolutions and report to the 
Board. 

The latter committee presented the following resolutions 
to the Board, and they were unanimously adopted by a 
rising vote : 

Whereas^ Death has removed from this Board an es- 
teemed member, Mrs. Etta F. Martin, therefore 

Resolved^ That in the brief association which she had 
with this Board, she gained its highest esteem and confi- 
dence, and 

Resolved^ That in her death the Board feels that it has 
lost a wise counselor, the schools a sincere friend, and the 
public a devoted servant. 

Rcsolvedy That this Board extends its sympathy to the 
friends of the deceased in their affliction, and especially to 
the bereaved husband and daughter in their great sorrow. 

Resolved^ That these resolutions be spread upon the 
records of this Board, that a copy be sent to the familj' of 
the deceased, and that one be sent to each of the daily 
papers of the city. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, 



FOR THE YEAR 1890. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



Ladies and Gentlemen of the School Committee: 

I have the honor of submitting to you my third annual 
Report of the schools of the city, which is the thirtieth of 
the series of annual Reports of the Superintendent of 
Schools. 

Not many important changes are to be noted. The 
year has been free from any special agitation in the admin- 
istration of the schools. The work has progressed most 
auspiciously, interrupted only by the epidemic of la grippe, 
which prevailed for a few weeks at the beginning of the 
year, and by the resignations of several teachers for 
various causes. The records in all the departments, high, 
elementary, and evening, show the largest enrollment 
hitherto known in the history of the schools ; the course 
of instruction has been unified in several particulars ; the 
methods of teaching and governing give evidence of 
improvement, and the conditions are good for future prog- 
ress. 

But along just what lines the future progress of the 
schools is to be worked out is, in a measure, yet to be 
determined. The educational world is rife with projects 
by which the coming generation is to be benefited. There 
may be those who feel that they are on solid ground ; 
there certainly are many who do not. The conservatives 
cling to the old curriculum and think it sufficient, while 
those who are more progressive feel that it needs modifi- 



36 superintendent's report. 

cation. They would add manual training in its different 
forms ; they would have the physical training of the pupils 
placed on a scientific basis ; they would have more time 
given to the study of natural sciences in the elementary 
grades ; they would magnify art instruction throughout 
the whole course. In addition to these branches, which 
are being urged for a more general recognition in the 
school curriculum by many of the leading minds in educa- 
tional matters, other subjects are thrust forward for 
recognition by less thoughtful advocates, who appear to 
regard the school as the only educating force of society 
and seem to think that it has no limitations. 

To deal with the problems that confront those in charge 
of the schools of to-day, there is need, then, not only of 
wisdom in administration, but there is also required calm, 
patient investigation by them. This means self-denial and 
sacrifice on their part. The school committees of this city 
have always been noted for the time and thought that they 
have given to the duties of their office. I am confident 
that I shall not appeal to you in vain when I ask of you to 
give your earnest attention the ensuing year to the ques- 
tions now pressing for consideration, that the schools 
under your charge may not suflfer, either by clinging too 
long to that which is not the best, or by adopting unadvis- 
edly something which is new. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

The school accommodations of the city are constantly 
being enlarged and improved, both by the erection of new 
buildings and by alterations of the old ones when practi- 
cable and feasible. The city government has met the 
wishes of the School Committee in regard to school build- 
ings with a most liberal and progressive spirit. One 
would scarcely recognize in the new Dartmouth street and 
Acushnet school houses any features that characterized 



superintendent's report. 37 

those they replaced. Both were completed last spring and 
have been occupied since. The former is a six-room 
building, the latter is one of three. Both are attractive 
within and without; they are well lighted, and the heating 
and ventilating arrangements are fairly acceptable. I can 
see no reason why they should not be healthful and serve 
well the purposes for which they were built. 

In answer to your request for a new building to supplant 
the one occupied by the Grove school in the south part of 
the city, one of brick, and containing ten rooms and hall, 
has been built, and will be ready for occupancy by the 
first of April next. It is to be heated and ventilated in 
accordance with one of the most approved methods known 
to modern architecture. It will furnish relief to the over- 
crowded schools in that section, besides allowing the aban- 
donment of the Grove school house, which long ago was 
considered unfit for school purposes. 

In all probability a four-room brick building will be 
built on the Kempton street lot the coming year. If this 
is done the pupils who now attend the William street school 
will be transferred to the new building, and the William 
street school house abandoned. This is much to be 
desired ; for the last mentioned building is neither large 
enough to accommodate the children who should attend it, 
nor suitable, for many reasons, for school use. 

Much money has been spent on the Fourth street school 
bouse within a year to improve the heating and venti- 
lation. This building of six rooms was formerly heated 
by stoves, and ventilated only by the windows. Hot air 
furnaces have superseded the stoves, and ventilating flues 
heated by gas jets have been placed in the different rooms 
to carry oflf" the vitiated air. But notwithstanding all that 
has been done, the results, so far as the ventilation is con- 
cerned, are still unsatisfactory. 
The usual amount of minor repairs and improvements 



38 superintendent's report. 

have been made, and the buildings are in a very good 
condition throughout the city. 

There are two suggestions that I desire to offer in this 
connection before closing. The first is, that those school 
yards that are muddy in wet weather (and certainly we 
have much of that kind of weather here) be covered with 
a coat of powdered stone. If this were done, it would 
prove beneficial to the health of the children, and would 
lighten the labors of the janitors and teachers. 

The second suggestion is, that some of the school houses, 
at least, be re-named, and that each new school house be 
given a more appropriate name than that of the street 
upon which it happens to be located. 

THE ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS. 

While the total enrollment and the average membership 
of pupils in the schools w^ere larger for the year than ever 
before, the attendance in some respects was not satis- 
factorv. There were too many cases of tardiness and 
dismissal ; there certainly was an extreme number of ab- 
sences. It is true that special causes contributed to affect 
the last ; it is also true that the percentage of absence 
reported from many cities was abnormally large for the 
year, due probably to the epidemic of disease that passed 
over the country in the early part of the year. 

There is food for reflection, however, when the number 
of absences that occurred in our schools for the year is 
considered, if due allowance is made for those that oc- 
curred by reason of sickness. With an average member- 
ship of 4,H09 pupils, there were 9(),()58 days of absence. 
This is J^O.O days, or a fraction over a school-month, of 
absence for every pupil belonging. It seems to me this 
is a serious matter. Some pupils are absent but little, and 
a few not at all ; some are absent continually for one 
excuse and another. 



superintendent's report. 39 

The causes of absence may be classified under the follow- 
ing heads: 1. Sickness. 2. Necessary home demands. 
S. Truancy. 4. Want of appreciation by many parents 
of their duty in respect to the schools. I do not enumerate 
as one of the causes of absence, indifference of the 
teachers to the attendance of their pupils, for I am confi- 
dent that every reasonable effort is made by them to secure 
regular and punctual attendance. 

In analyzing these causes of absence the questions that 
arise are : First, how much sickness among the pupils 
is traceable to the condition of the school houses and sur- 
roundings? second, how much is due to neglect on the 
part of the teachers? third, how much of it may be 
attributed to other causes? For the first two the school 
authorities are directly responsible, and where unhealthful 
conditions exist, or there is neglect, should do all in their 
power to remedy them. Is this being done? In reply to 
the questions raised, I will say that I have no doubt that 
many cases of sickness have their origin in the conditions 
incident to the school room ; some of these are preventable, 
some are not. With all the care that can be exercised 
(and I think due precaution is taken in our schools to pre- 
vent the communication of disease), the collecting of many 
children together day after day must necessarily cause 
more or less infection. On the other hand, I have no 
doubt that more or less sickness is caused by improperly 
heated and ventilated school houses, and from the condi- 
tion at times of certain school yards. These conditions 
can be remedied and are being improved constantly. 

Some cases of sickness are probably due to the lack of 
proper oversight by the teachers of their pupils. The 
teacher stands m loco parentis in more senses than that of 
authority. He becomes, during school hours, the guard- 
ian of each pupil's physical as well as mental and moral 
well-being. The wise parent teaches his child not to go 



40 SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 

from a heated room into the chill of the winter air without 
being properly protected ; he teaches him to avoid sitting 
in draughts of air, to keep his feet warm and dry, and, in 
short, aims to inculcate simple hygienic laws, and, so far 
as he is able, sees to it that these laws are observed bv 
his child. To give attention to these matters and enforce 
them with every child under his charge, is the duty of each 
teacher. I fear that a judicious watchfulness is not 
observed by all of them in the exercise of their duties. 

For absence caused by "necessary home demands" there 
is no remedy. A parent most assuredly has the right to 
detain his child from school occasionally when he has need 
of his services. With that right I will not cavil, although 
there is no question that a little self-denial on the part of 
parents, in many cases, would reduce greatly the cases of 
absence for this reason. For truancy the home is largely 
responsible ; but not entirely. The teacher of power and 
tact has few truants. For the last cause of absence, *'the 
want of appreciation, by many parents, of their duty in 
respect to the schools," I shall allow some one else to find 
excuse. This is the source of the unnecessary absences : 
there are a great many due to this cause. It is the one 
most annoying to the teacher, the one most injurious to the 
schools ; for it stimulates and fosters wrong principles in 
the minds of the pupils. 

To inspire in the pupils a spirit of obedience to lawful 
authority, and to fix in them habits which are the growth 
of duty well performed each day, are the highest functions 
of the public school. That the teachers may be able the 
better to inculcate this spirit, and to form their habits, 
cordial support ought to be rendered them by those whose 
interest in the children should be stronger than that of any 
teacher. 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 4I 

TRUANCY. 

As long as schools exist there will undoubtedly be 
truants. The ratio will vary with the conditions that 
surround the schools, and the homes from which the pupils 
come. But even with the best of schools and good homes, 
the child nature will occasionally rebel against the con- 
finement and duties of the school room, and will seek 
enjoyment out of its confines. But when a good teacher 
fails to check a pupil inclined to truancy, the facts are that 
either that pupil is abnormally inclined to evil or comes 
from a home which is a home but in name. Truancy 
thrives best, then, in those places where there are many 
homes in which the children by reason of the ignorance, 
poverty, or vices of their parents are neglected ; therefore 
large cities usually have the greatest ratio of truants. 

There was less truancy in the schools last year than the 
year before, although the number of pupils enrolled was 
larger. The number of cases reported for the year 1890 
was 244 ; for the year 1889, 249. The efficient service of 
the truant officers is to be commended. A detailed state- 
ment of the labors of each is appended. 

TRUANT OFFICER'S REPOR \\ 

Schools visited, 1,287 

Absences reported 63' teachers, 455 

Absences withtiut permission of p.-ireiitP, 72 

Second offences, 32 

Third offences, 21 

Pirents notifled. 554 

Arrests, 13 

Prosecutions, 13 

Tardinesses investigated, 16 

On probation, 2 

Sentenced to truant school, 15 

Taken to school from street, 25 

Visits to mills, 58 

VioUtions of labor law, 17 

6 



42 superixtendext's report. 

A.S:?LSTA\T TBUAXT OFFICERS REPOKl'. 

Boy»i lutervlewed od street!?, 23 

SchooU vifiited, t2r2 

Mill« and mereaiDtile ef>tabIi«hiDeDt:s viiiitetK 664 

Ca«e§ of abftences iDvestigated, 298 

Violationif of lahxir law, 5 

THE LAWS RELATING TO THE EMPLOYMENT 
OF CHILDREN AND THEIR ATTENDANCE 

UPON SCHOOL. 

In my Report last year I gave a complete summary of 
the laws relating to the employment of children and their 
attendance at school. Since the writing of that article 
these laws have been still further amended. Chapter 47 
of the Public Statutes now reads as follows : 

Sp:ct. 1. Every persou having under his coDtrol a child between the 
ago8 of ei^ht and fourteen years, shall annually cause such child to 
attend some public day school in the city or town in which he resides; 
and such attendance shall continue for at least thirty weeks of the school 
year, if the schools are kept open that length of time, with an allow- 
ance of two weeks' time for absence not excused by the Sui>erintendent 
of Schools or the S<'hool Committee, and for every neglect of such duty 
the person offending shall, upon the complaint of the School Committee 
or any truant officer, forfeit to the use of the public schools of such city 
or town a sum not exceeding twenty dollars; but if such child has 
attended for a like period of time a private day school, approved by the 
School (.'ommittee of such city or town, or if such child has been other- 
wise instructed for a like period of time in the branches of learning 
required by law to be taught in the public schools, or has already 
acquired the branches of learning required by law to be taught in the 
public schools, or if his physical or mental condition is such as to render 
such attendance inexpedient or impracticable, such penalties shall not 
be incurred. 

Sect. 2. For the purposes of the preceding section, School Com- 
mittees shall approve a private school only when the teaching in all the 
studies required by law is in the English language, and when they are 
satisfied that such teaching ec^uals in thoroughness and efficiency the 
teaching in the public schools in the same locality, and that equal prog- 
ress is made by the pupils therein, in the studies required by law, with 
that made during the same time in the public schools ; but they shall 
not refuse to approve a private school on account of the religious teach- 
ing therein. 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 43 

The most important change in the law is the one by 
which the compulsory attendance each year of children 
under fourteen has been raised from twenty to thirty 
weeks. The effect is plainly perceptible in the increased 
attendance at the mill schools, of which I will speak in 
connection with thpse schools. 

Another act passed since my last Report was issued, is 
as follows : 

Acts of 1890. Cnxv, 299. 
AN ACT 

IN RELATION TO THE AGE AND SCHOOLIN(J CERTIFICATES 
OF CHILDREN EMPLOYED IX FACTORIES, WORKSHOPS. AND 
MERCANTILE ESTABLISHMENTS. 

Sect. 1. The followiug words shall appear on all age and schooling 
certificates enumerated in section four of chapter three hundred forty- 
eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred eighty-eight, after the 
name of the town or city, and date: — This certificate belongs to the 
person in whose behalf it has been drawn, and it shall be surrendered to 
him (or her) whenever he (or she) leaves the service of the corporation 
or employer holding the same ; and any such corporation or employer 
refusing to so deliver the same shall be punished by a fine of ten dollars. 

Sect. 2. Any corporation or employer holding any age or schooling 
certificate enunierated in section four of chapter three hundred forty- 
eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred eighty-eight, and refusing 
to deliver the same to the person in whose behalf it has been drawn, 
when such person shall leave the employ of said corporation or employer, 
shall be punished by a fine of ten dollars. 

Manufacturing cities are aflected to a greater extent by 
all this labor legislation than any others. Over twenty-five 
hundred labor certificates have been issued from my office 
within a period of less than three years. Every change 
^n these laws adds more or less to the duties of my de- 
partment. While I am not disposed to find fault with 
legislation that seeks to uplift humanity, I cannot suppress 
the feeling that some of the recent legislation in this state 
relating to school attendance is causing much individual 
hardship without producing corresponding benefit. 



44 SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 

TEACHERS AND CHANGES IN THE CORPS. 

For various reasons many changes have occurred in the 
teaching force during the year. It is not desirable that 
changes in it should be frequent, and cases of forced res- 
ignation are not of common occurrence in ours. This fact 
should give it stability, and should be a factor in securing 
from each individual composing it his best efforts. No 
tenure of office act is needed to give permanency to any 
teacher's position here, provided he is qualified to fill it 
and performs his duty faithfully. And in making this 
observation I do not place myself in opposition to the 
"tenure of office law," but, so far as its operation is 
concerned, its adoption here would appear superfluous. 
This feeling may not be shared by the teachers, and it 
may be that many good ones of sensitive disposition 
undergo at election time each year a strain that may be 
prejudicial to their health and teaching. It seems to me 
that a rule of the Board which has long been in operation 
reaches the vital object of the ''tenure of office act," 
which is, that the services of no teacher shall be dispensed 
with except for good cause, reasons for which shall be 
given. The rule reads as follows : 

At least three months before the annual election of teachers, the sub- 
committee of each department of the schools shall meet (the Superin- 
tendent being present), and carefully consider the merits of each 
teacher belonging to such department ; and if occasion shall be found 
for adverse criticism of any teacher, official notice shall be given to such 
teacher forthwith, the facts in question being specified as far as possible, 
that there ma3' be opportunity for amendment. 

During the week prior to election, the sub-committee shall again 
meet for tlie same purpose; and if demerit in any case shall still remain, 
such case shall be reported to the Board. 

When vacancies have occurred the Board has filled 
them with candidates residing in the city, if there were 
those available who, in its judgment, were qualified ; if 
there were not, candidates were sought for elsewhere. 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 45 

The vacancies occurring in the High school were tilled by 
advancing teachers from the grammar schools. The 
special teacher of music, chosen to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Mr. Diman, who had so faithfully 
and efficiently supervised the musical instruction in our 
schools for some years, was invited here from Washing- 
ton, D. C, where he was holding a similar position. Mr. 
Arthur J. Gumming, whose ability as an artist had evi- 
denced itself during his long connection with the schools, 
resigned his position as teacher in the High schools at the 
close of the summer term ; his place was filled by the 
election of Miss Florence A. Cleaves, a graduate of the four- 
years course in the Boston Normal Art School, and a 
teacher of some experience. Miss Adelaide B. Hyde, 
supervisor of drawing in the primary, grammar, and 
country schools, was granted leave of absence for the fall 
term on account of illness. Not finding the relief that 
she had hoped to gain by a long rest, she resigned her 
position at the close of the term. Miss Hyde had charge 
of this department of the work but one year ; she accom- 
plished, however, much in that time, proving herself a 
competent supervisor of teachers and instructor of chil- 
dren. Had she been able to continue her work here a 
few years, the drawing in our lower schools would have 
ranked with the best. Miss Blanche I. George, who 
succeeds her, is a graduate of the four-years course in 
4e Boston Normal Art School, and has had successful 
experience, both as teacher and supervisor in places near 
Boston. 

The vacancies in the other departments were filled 
either by teachers of successful experience or by grad- 
uates of the Training school ; and it may be well to remark 
here that all the graduates of this school, to date, are 
teaching in the city. 

Two of the resignations in the grammar department 



46 superintendent's report. 

deserve more than a passing notice. Miss Eliza J. E 
Shepherd, who resigned from the Parker street school, ha 
taught in the schools of the city fifty consecutive yean 
Miss Helen M. Gordon, who resigned from the san 
school, had taught forty-three years. They both fillt 
their positions to the last with remarkable eflicienc] 
Such cases are rare ; and it would be no more than simp 
justice if all teachers who have served for forty yea: 
should be retired on half pay. In appreciation of tl 
services of these teachers the Board unanimously adopts 
the following resolutions : 

Besolved, That it is with sincere regret that we part with Miss She 
herd and Miss Gordon, as teachers in our public schools. Their loi 
record has been one of faithful, painstaking service, and we hope th 
will reap a merited reward in their retirement. It is certain they car 
with them, not only our good wishes, but also those of the pupils wh< 
they have so carefully labored to advance in educational matters, and 
can say that they have fairly earned the plaudit, '* Well done, good a 
faithful servants." 

A list of the resignations from the corps and the appoii 
ments to the same for the year, are as follows : 

RESIGNATIONS. 

Emma H. Wheeler, High school. 
Sarah W. Almy, Fifth street granmiar school. 
Sarah A. Carr, Fifth street grammar school. 
Elizabeth P. Brightman, Fifth street grammar school. 
Helen M. Gordon, Parker street grammar school. 
Eliza J. D. Shepherd, Parker street grammar school. 
Enmia C. Nash, Parker street gnnnmar school. 
Chella F. Carpenter, Thompson street grammar school. 
Ida G. Howard, Fourth street primary school. 
Annie B. Parker, Clark's Point school. 
Mary Chace, Plainville school. 
Arthur J. Cumming, High school, drawing. 
Adelaide B. Hyde, elementary schools, drawhig. 
Fred L. DIman, singing. 



superintendent's report. 47 

TRANSFERS. 

Helen L. Hadley, from Fifth street to High. 
Hatiie F. Hart, from Middle street to Fifth street. 
Mabel W. Oleaveland, from Middle street to fligh. 

APPOINTMENTS. PERMANENT. 

Florence A. Cleaves, High school, drawing. 

Etta M. Abbott, Middle street grammar. 

n. Jennie Kirby, Parl^er street grammar. 

Anna I. Dexter, Parker street grammar. 

Cora B. Cleaveland, Thompson street grammar. 

Leonora B. Hamblin, Thompson street grammar. 

Annie F. Smith, Dartmouth street primary. 

Alice A. Taylor, Fourth street primary. 

Myra A. I^ach, Fourth street primary. 

Annie L. Brownell, Thompson street primary. 

Mary E. Uauey, Plainville country school. 

Blanche I. George, supervisor of drawing. 

F. H. Butterfleld, supervisor of music. 



'IT 



TEMPOHARY ASSIGNMENTS. 

Blanche W. Sheldon, Fifth street grammar. 
Rachel L. Denham, Acushnet avenue primary. 
Mary E. Pasho, Maxfield street primary. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The average membership of pupils attending these 
schools during the year was 2,523. This is fifty-five per 
cent, of the year's membership in all the schools. 

These figures show that the primary grades in the city 
proper, comprising the first four years of school life only, 
contained more pupils for the year than were in the gram- 
niar schools, the country schools, the mill schools, and the 
High school combined ; and this proportion holds true for 
each year. This fact alone indicates their relative impor- 
tance in the school system, for it shows that many chil- 
dren get their whole schooling in the primary grades. 
But their chief claim for consideration is, that the time 



48 superintendent's report. 

during which the children are in ihem is an especially form- 
ative period in their lives. The majority of pupils who 
attend them are from five to eleven years of age ; there are 
some who are older, consisting of children who are either 
foreign-born or who have had few early advantages. 

To teach this heterogeneous class of children with their 
different dispositions to conduct themselves properly in 
their relations to the school and each other, and at the 
same time train them to think and to reason, as well as to 
acquire knowledge, is not within the power of a novice. 
Amos Comenius, the great educator, in speaking of this 
matter, and the different dispositions with which teachers 
had to deal, classifies them as follows : 

"1. There are children who are ingenious, anxious to 
learn, tractable, and suited above all for students; these 
require only an oflTer of food for wisdom ; they grow like 
rare plants. Care is needed, in fact, to prevent any over- 
exertion on their part, which is too often followed by wea- 
riness and disgust. 2. Others are penetrating and slow, 
but withal tractable ; these need only to be spurred on. 
3. There are children who are penetrating and studious, 
but stubborn and obstinate ; they are generally hated in 
schools, and one is inclined to give them up ; yet these 
generally grow to be the greatest men, if they are cor- 
rectly trained. 4. There are obedient and studious children 
who are, however, slow and difficult of comprehension. 
These must follow in the tracks of the former ; and that 
this may be possible, we must stoop to their level, we 
must not place too heavy burdens upon them, nor judge 
them harshly, but must bear with them willingly, raise 
them, encourage them, cheer them, that they may take 
heart. They may reach the goal later, but will endure 
longer, as late fruits generally do. 5. Some are dull, 
troublesome, and lazy. These can also be improved, but 
there must be no obstinacy, and much skill and patience 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 49 

are required. 6. There are dull ones who are by nature 
ill-willed, wrong-headed and generally spoiled. Even here 
we should not lose hope at first. If it is, however, impos- 
sible to improve them, they should be left alone." 

The child nature has not changed since Comenius lived 
and wrote. 

I realize that this subject of the relative importance of 
the primary schools has been dwelt upon at length in pre- 
vious Reports. I again bring it forward because I find the 
feeling still extant here, that an inferior order of ability 
^^^]l answer in a teacher of a primary grade, especially in 
the lowest. I can see no reason why it should exist any- 
where, except one, that children in the primary grades do 
not easily recognize the weakness of teachers, especially 
in the matter of discipline. For this reason the teacher 
with weak powers of government escapes criticism longer 
in a primary than in a grammar grade. While I am ready 
to admit that it requires a difl^erent order of ability to make 
a successful teacher in the higher grades, no more superior 
order is needed there than in the lower, if permanent, and 
not superficial, results are contemplated. It is unquestion- 
ably true that many a pupil's whole school course has been 
injured through faulty teaching to which he was subjected 
at the beginning. Let the foundaiion be firm if the super- 
structure is to endure ; this truth pertains with the same 
force to the realm of thought as to the material world. 

This department is in good condition, and has had a 
successful year ; it has elements of weakness, however, 
which I presume must be expected. The teachers are 
earnest and interested in their work. By the study of ed- 
ucational literature, by visiting their co-workers in other 
cities, and by other means, they are constantly striving to 
improve themselves and their schools. But while all may 
be equally earnest in their efforts, some are contending 
against disadvantages. These are the lack of natural apti- 

7 



50 superintendent's report. 

lude for teachings or of training for their work, or both. 
Difference in ability must be expected in those who choose 
the teaching profession, as well as in those who choose 
any other ; but one who elects the profession of teaching 
having no love for children and possessing but little ability 
to govern others, makes a greater mistake than the person 
who attempts to be a painter, possessing no power to draw, 
no eye for color, no gift of imagination. Those who are 
laboring at disadvantage by want of special training for 
their work, can remedy this by study and observation ; in 
the meanwhile those who sit under their teaching must 
suffer. The employment of untrained teachers has char- 
acterized the policy here no more than in many other 
places in this country, and the growth of the normal and 
the training schools is but a reaction against the folly of 
such a course. 

The order in many rooms is excellent, and in others 
unsatisfactory. Good order is the result of good govern- 
ment, and the latter has its source in the judicious appli- 
cation of force and reason. It is true that whippings have 
been less frequent (a thing in itself commendable), but 
the results sought for in discipline are not yet attained in 
these grades as a whole. Neither much whipping nor 
the entire absence of it produces good discipline and order 
in a school. The power to whip when necessary is the 
teacher's prerogative, but, as I have said before, neither 
the constant application of this power, nor the refusal to 
use it will necessarily secure good order. Vigilance, firm- 
ness without harshness, tact in dealing with issues, and 
discrimination in applying punishment — these are the 
means upon which the wise teacher will rely for govern- 
ment, and not upon any set forms of punishment. Charges 
of favoritism and injustice made by children against 
teachers, frequently have foundation, although those 
against whom they are made may feel entirely uncon- 



superintendent's report. 5 1 

scious of having shown either. They come from such 
teachers having no uniformity in their methods of gov- 
erning; they punish certain actions as faults one day 
that they ignore another ; they are spasmodic in the treat- 
ment of breaches of discipline, and yet wonder why their 
pupils are so troublesome. Without good order in a 
school, there is not only waste of time, but habits are en- 
gendered in the pupils, the consequence of w^hich cannot 
be computed. 

The number of pupils to a teacher, computed on the 
average membership, is about forty-five, and computed on 
the average daily attendance is forty or less. These num- 
bers represent the minimum number of pupils that are 
assigned to a teacher in the most progressive cities. The 
amount of work demanded by the curriculum is less than 
in the majority of other cities. If these facts are taken 
into consideration with the other, that no city in the Union 
supplies better facilities for work (due to the income from 
the Sylvia Ann Rowland fund), there seems to be no 
reason why these schools should not occupy the foremost 
place, at least in the quality of the work done. They do 
rank well, and with the strength that is being given them 
by supplying all vacancies in the teaching force with trained 
teachers, they will improve. I would not imply that it is 
«nly through the addition of these trained teachers that 
the schools are to be improved, or to have it inferred 
that most of the present teachers are not capable. But 
the custom has prevailed here of offering the vacancies 
occurring in the grammar grades to successful teachers in 
the primary grades, and many of them, for the sake of 
tbe higher salary or other reasons, have accepted ; the 
positions in the primary grades were then filled, in many 

• 

instances, with untrained teachers. This course has nec- 
essarily tended to weaken the primary grades, for while 
the new teachers were getting their experience, the schools 



52 superintendent's report. 

suffered, and experience only does not always supply the 
deficiency of special training. Just as long as it is con- 
sidered a promotion to serve in a grammar grade rather 
than in a primary, and a difference in salary exists, this 
disturbing influence must continue. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

These schools had an average membership for the year 
of 1,473 pupils, or thirty-two per cent, of the average 
membership of all the different departments of the day 
schools. About fifty per cent, of pupils who enter the 
grammar schools remain in them ; only between fifty and 
sixty per cent, of these enter the High school. A?? only 
fifteen per cent, of those who enter the schools remain in 
them long enough to reach the High school, and only about 
five per cent, graduate, it is obvious that the great majority 
of our citizens, even under the strict laws of Massachusetts, 
complete their school education in the elementary schools. 

How important it is, then, that they have paramount con- 
sideration in school affairs. Is it true that they receive it? 
Should not the same discrimination be exercised in select- 
ing teachers for them as for high schools, and salaries 
paid that bear a higher ratio to those paid in high schools? 

The record of this department for the year is uneventful, 
so far as innovations and radical changes tend to make it 
so. The teachers have tried to govern without resorting 
frequently to corporal punishment, and have succeeded in 
reducing the number of cases. Some have felt, however, 
that the expression of opinion regarding corporal punish- 
ment has awakened a spirit of defiance, in many pupils. 
I fail to understand why this should be so, for there has 
been no attempt to take the power of administering it from 
the teachers, nor is there any desire to do so. It is only 
desired to keep it within reason. There are few cities 



superintendent's report. 53 

where it prevails to a greater extent than it does here even 
now, notwithstanding the large reduction in number that has 
already been made. Excellent order is secured in schools 
with but very little whipping, and it can be done anywhere 
if there is a healthy public sentiment supporting them. 
What I have said under the head of primary schools about 
government, applies with equal force to these grades. 
Many issues can be avoided in the school room by the ex- 
ercise of vigilance and tact by the teacher. It appears to 
me that it is better, as a rule, with grammar pupils, when 
reasoning fails to secure obedience, to notify their parents, 
and if this does not have the desired effect, to suspend 
them until they can obey, rather than to whip much. 
Printed forms, approved by the Committee, are now fur- 
nished teachers for this purpose. A few cases of suspen- 
sion occurred in the year. In most instances the remedy 
loured the complaint. In nearly every case the parents 
cooperated with the school authorities, and this was suffi- 
cient to produce the desired results. 

The instruction has been intelligent and effective as a 
whole. Certainly the teachers have striven to secure good 
results. They have been urged to make their teaching as 
objective as possible, and to try to awaken in the pupils a 
spirit of inquiry and research. Not all have been able, as 
yet, to emancipate themselves from the methods established 
by the prevailing customs of the past. There is yet too 
n^uch of the pouring-in process extant, and not enough de- 
veloping of the powers of the pupils. A machine can be 
filled with facts, to be taken out on the *' nickel in the slot" 
plan; so can the pupils be crammed with facts to be 
drawn out at will by the teacher, but such teaching should 
not characterize the work in the schools, nor is there any 
excuse for it here. The teachers are left as free as possi- 
ble, so far as the teaching itself is concerned, and yet have 
unity in the work. The studies are prescribed and the limit- 



54 superintendent's report. 

ations set, but no examinations for promotion are given by 
the Committee or Superintendent. Why, then, should not 
the best results be obtained, especially if it is true, as has 
been repeatedly claimed by teachers everywhere both in 
private and in public, that one of the chief preventatives to 
good work in the past was the prevailing custom of basing 
promotions on examinations given by committees or super- 
intendents? 

Again, it appears to me that the principle so much 
emphasized in recent years, namely, that pupils must 
learn to do by doing, is somewhat misinterpreted and mis- 
applied. I refer to the direction it is taking in written 
work. There is too much of it. Before the principles 
underlying the subject being studied are sufficiently devel- 
oped, it is often the case that the pupils are set to work 
with slates or paper to exemplify them. It is true of the 
schools here as it is elsewhere. Teachers, as a rule, are 
too impatient to see visible results ; and yet, when these 
are unsatisfactory, are apt to be disturbed, and frequently 
blame the pupils when they are not at fault ; they haven't 
understood what is wanted of them. 

Written work has its function, and an important one, in 
the school room ; but, except in teaching a few branches, 
it should be used for drill, or a means by w^hich the 
pupils express the knowledge that they have acquired. 
In short, it is a method of fixing and cultivating knowl- 
edge, not of implanting it. Therefore, in arithmetic, the 
oral and mental (so called) work should be given more 
prominence. Every new principle enunciated to a class 
should be most thoroughly explained, the language in 
which it is clothed analyzed and interpreted, and thorough 
oral drill should precede the written application ; in geog- 
raphy, written work is either an examination on facts or a 
language exercise, and as such has its usefulness, but is 
not to be substituted for that teaching by which the world, 



superintendent's report. 55 

lis phenomena, its products, and its inhabitants become to 
the pupils the visible and tangible things that they are. 
And so on with other studies the arguments might be mul- 
tiplied. I have been led to speak of this written work in 
the schools because I have been unfavorably impressed, in 
my visits, with the amount of it that is done, and the results 
obtained. I could not but feel, often, that the teachers 
were reaping where they had not sown. 

The teaching of elementary science is important, and 
should receive more attention in our lower schools. What 
is now done is desultory, and varies much in the different 
schools. There is no established course in it. When 
rightly conducted, there is no study that appeals more 
strongly to young pupils. It is well calculated to develop 
their powers of observation and comparison. It can be 
taught to advantage in connection with other branches, 
especially geography and language. 

The "visiting days/* inaugurated over a year ago, have 
proven successful. Many parents and others interested 

• 

m the schools have been drawn into them on these days. 
The regular work of the curriculum is carried out, these 
days differing from others only in the fact that visitors are 
specially invited and provision made for them to see as 
niuch of the methods of teaching and the results obtained 
^^ possible. Between seven and eight hundred visitors 
3re recorded as visiting these grades last year, exclusive 
of visits made by the Superintendent and Committee. Noth- 
ing is more desired by those in charge of the schools than 
to have our citizens possess an intimate knowledge of the 
^'ork done in them ; to see for themselves the methods 
employed, and the results obtained ; to realize by personal 
observation the difficulties that are to be encountered in 
handling large numbers of pupils, and to better compre- 
hend the reason why certain things which may appear to 
outsiders unnecessary are done, and why others which 



56 sltperintendext's report. 

they feel ought to be done are not done. While advice 
and candid criticism, based on intelligent study and obser- 
vation of the schools, is welcome and will prove helpful in 
improving them, covert attacks made upon them, based 
upon isolated cases of apparent or even real wrong, are 
not just, do no good, but, on the contrary', are exceed- 
ingly harmful. 

COUNTRY SCHOOLS. 

There remain now but five schools classified as Coun- 
try schools. The Cannonville school having become a 
stricdy primary school was transferred to that depart- 
ment in September. But four of these are ungraded : the 
Clark's Point, the Plainville. the Rockdale, and the North : 
the Acushnet school is graded with three grades in each 
room. 

Two teachers resigned from these schools during the 
year ; the one at Plainville in June, and the one at Clark's 
Point in December. It is difficult to secure good teach- 
ers for the ungraded Country schools who are willing to 
serve in them for any length of time. Occasionally it 
happens that a good teacher resides, in the neighborhood 
of one of these schools ( as in the case of the North school 
at present), whose services can be secured and retained. 
But in most instances the teachers are compelled to board 
in the vicinity or to pay for transportation. In either case, 
they are put to extra expense and to much inconvenience. 
As the pay is no larger than that of teachers in the more 
favored portions, the successful ones are constantly seek- 
ing transfers to more desirable places. In addition to the 
inconvenience and expense to which this class of teachers 
is subjected, their work is laborious and exacting. Some- 
times one of these schools has the whole nine jrrades in 
it, which includes pupils from the lowest primary to those 
fitting for the High school. It requires more than ordi- 



superintendent's report. 57 

nary ability to make one of these schools efficient, and 
this ought to be recognized in some substantial manner. 

Again, those who are forced to send their children to 
these schools are certainly entitled to the very best teach- 
ing for them. The school represents far more to both the 
children and parents in suburban settlements than in the 
urban. In order, therefore, to make this teaching most 
effective, something must be done to attract strong teach- 
ers to these positions, and to retain them there. This, I 
think, could be accomplished by paying larger salaries in 
them than in any other positions in the elementary schools. 
This I would recommend to be done. 

An effort was made, more than a year since, to give the 
teachers of these schools more assistance in the subjects of 
drawing and music than they had previously received ; 
but the work was interrupted by the resignations of the 
special teachers in these branches. Arrangements have 
already been made, however, with the new teachers in 
these subjects to continue this instruction. 

With the exception of one school, the work done in 
them was quite satisfactory. If thorough, trained teachers 
could be secured for all of them, there is no reason why 
their work should not compare favorably with the best 
done in the graded schools of the city proper. 

The Acushnet school is now as well housed as any in 
the city. Through the improved facilities for administer- 
^ng the school, and the efforts made by the teachers to 
improve the teaching, its efficiency has been much 
increased. 

MILL SCHOOLS. 

The law that was passed by the legislature a year ago 

requiring thirty weeks of schooling from each child until 

he is fourteen, instead of twenty, as heretofore, combined 

with some local causes, has increased the attendance on 

8 



58 superintendent's report. 

these schools very materially. Although the membership 
for the whole year does not vary greatly from that of the 
preceding year, it is due to the fact that the law did not 
begin to be effective until the fall term. There are now 
twice as many pupils in these schools as there were a year 
ago. 

The large attendance now necessitates the employment 
of an additional teacher in each school. Both schools are 
now cramped for room, but relief is soon to be provided. 
The completion of the Division street school will relieve 
the one in the south part of the city, and two additional 
rooms are to be built in the attic of the Cedar Grove 
school to accommodate the north school. The schools 
have done well during the year. The conditions are dif- 
ficult to contend with, but both of the principals possess 
excellent administrative powers, which, coupled with their 
long experience, give them the ability to manage their 
schools successfully. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Elementary sehools, — These schools have grown to 
large proportions within the last few years. The causes 
of this growth have been given in previous Reports. The 
enrollment for the year was 11M)3, divided as follows: 
Males, 1263 ; females, 730. They necessitate the employ- 
ment of nearly fifty teachers and four principals. Their 
cost for the year was $9,370.08. 

When they were reopened in the fall some changes were 
made : the salaries of the teachers were readjusted ; all 
experienced assistants are now paid the same, $5. .50 per 
week, and the pay of the principals is scaled according to 
the size of the diflferent schools and the responsibility 
involved ; the Central school was abolished and the 
teachers transferred to other schools. 

The success of these schools since the reorganization 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 59 

took place (two years ago) has been marked. System in 
organization and good methods of teaching have effected 
this. These are as necessary for the success of evening 
as for day schools- Many pupils have been granted cer- 
tificates of qualification which freed them from the neces- 
sity of attending. These certificates are issued to those 
who enter the schools as illiterates and become able to 
read and write easy English. 

The accommodations at the Cedar Grove school house 
are not adapted to evening school pupils. The seats, 
except in two rooms, are altogether too small. The 
passage ways are utilized, but this is a poor makeshift. I 
see no way by which the matter can be improved much 
until a new school house is built in that vicinity for 
grammar grades. This will probably be necessary in a 
year or two. Many pupils who attend the Fifth street 
school are compelled to walk extremely long distances ; 
many from the Rowland Mill Village and from localities 
equally remote. I recommend that rooms be opened next 
vvinter in one of the school houses in the south part of the 
city for the accommodation of these pupils. 

Drawing school. — This school has had a successful 
year. The whole enrollment was 84, divided as follows : 
Males, 69; females, 15. The average nightly attendance 
was 64. 

Miss Florence A. Cleaves, teacher of drawing in the High 
school, took charge of this school at the opening of the 
fall term. She teaches the freehand department. Mr. 
Nye and Mr. Stetson have taught the same departments 
that they did last year. 

A complete course of study was framed for the schools 
last year and put on trial. It was revised this year, and 
in its revised form is now the course followed. As it fur- 
nishes a complete outline of what is attempted in the 
school I will give it below. 



fiOGSU? 



6o superintendent's report. 

» 

In closing, I have but to say that the school is now on a 
good working basis, and the results are becoming very 
satisfactory in every department. More ought to seek the 
advantages offered by it. I think it would be an excellent 
idea to make a complete course of three years and grant 
diplomas to those worthily completing it. 

COURSE OF STUDY AND REGULATIONS. 
EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

FREEHAND. FIRST YEAR. 

To include seven sheets, as follows : 

1. Sheet of model drawing, outline, from object. 

2. Sheet of model drawing, outline, from object. 

3. Sheet of model drawing, light and shade (charcoal), from object. 

4. Sheet of model drawing, light and shade (charcoal), from object. 

5. Sheet of geometrical problems and historic ornament (preparatory 

for design). 

6. c Two designs, one based on sheet 5 ; the other based on material 



c rwc 



7. ( given by the teacher. 

FREEHAND. SECOND YEAR. 

To include live sheets, as follows: 

1. Sheet of outline drawing (hand, foot, or mask) from cast. 

2. Light and shade drawing (charcoal) of ornament from cast. 

3. Light and shade drawing (charcoal, hand, foot, or mask) from 

cast. 

4. /Two designs (subject to be chosen by student) — tiles, iron work, 
wall paper, any surface decoration, or design In the round. 

ADVANCED. 



-• { 



Students can confine themselves to cast drawing (medium as teacher 
shall direct), or continue work in design. 

MECHANICAL. FIRST YEAR. 

To include eight sheets, as follows : 
L Sheet of geometrical problems. 

2. Sheet of geometrical problems. 

3. Sheet of orthographic projection. 



superintendent's report. 6i 

4. Sheet of orthographic projection, intersection of solids. 

5. 8heet of orthographic projection, development of surfaces. 

fi. Sheet of orthographic projection, development of surfacies. 

7. Sheet of isometric projection, 1 ,^ ^. 

^. , - . * . . ^t Mf time permits. 

S. Sheet of isometric projection, 1 

ARCHITECTURE AND PLUMBING COURSE. 

SECOND YEAR. 

To include six sheets, as follows : 

^ j Sheets of details drawn in isometric : halving, mortise, and tennon, 
3* I framing, rooting, brickwork, etc. 



•* < Plan and elevation of house, framing, and roof truss of same. 



4. 

*). 

^». Drawing from some object drawn to measurement. 

MACHINE DRAWING. SECOND YEAR. 

To include seven sheets, as follows : 

2^ I Simple details of machinery : as regulation nut, bolt head, etc. 

3. ( 

^- \ Gearing : spur, bevel, and worm gear. 

5. I 

. r Developing a right and left hand, standard V, and square threaded 
l' \ screws, showing the technical, mechanical, and draughtsman's 
^ ways. 

ADVANCED. 

To include seven sheets, as follows : 

2] I Drawing of a milling machine head, which includes the screw and 
3. I gear problems. 

•• f 

^' J Detail drawings of the same machine; placing dimensions and 
-' I printing the number of each piece wanted. 

GENERAL EXPLANATORY NOTES. 

''"'^KEHAND Drawing. The aim is to give the student a thorough 
understanding of the principles of drawing, to t«ach the student 
to see for himself, and enable him to apply such knowledge to any 
work that includes drawing; also to give a thorough understanding 
of the underlying principles of design. 



62 superintendent's report. 

Mechanical Drawing. The aim is to teach mechanical drawing in 
such general form as to give a clear understanding of principles, 
and their application to any class of work. 

First Year. I. Plane Geometry: — From elementary principles to 
include all problems on which the subject and principles of mechan- 
ical drawing are directly based; to be given by lectures, and by 
geometrical construction by the pupils; this to include explanation 
of use of instruments, and to give practice in their use. 

II. Descriptive Geometry : — Being exercises principally in orth- 
ographic projection and applications of the preceding to the drawing 
of ordinary objects ; the object being to end the year with a thorough 
knowledge of the drawing of ordinary working drawings of various 
objects. 

The second year work in the Architectural Course is to include 
work on objects relating to building construction; to include alsc 
design and strength of material to a limited extent: that in the 
Plumbing Course to include a general description of plumbing 
plans, and construction, as required by the Board of Health. 

The second year work in the Machine Course is to give the stu- 
dent a thorough understanding of the principles of machine con- 
struction, and how the work is carried on In shops, as well as the 
draughtsman's ways of working. 

REGULATIONS. 

1. Each student is expected to be punctual and regular in his attend 
ance, obedient, and attentive to his work. 

2. No student will be admitted to either first year class after the 
third week of school, unless he is able to pass an examination in th< 
work already covered by the class. 

.3. When a student has completed the given number of sheets iueithei 
of the first year courses, and has passed a satisfactory examination ir 
the required subjects, he will receive a vvritt<»n acknowledgment of the 
same. 

When he has completed the second year's work, and passed an exam 
ination in the required subject.*, he will receive a certificate stating thai 
he has completed the regular course. 

A student who has finished the regular course may attend the schoo 
as an advanced student. 

4. If a student, wiien he enters the school, can pass an examinatioi 
in either of the first year courses, lie may join the second year class. 

5. If a student wastes, or destroys, any material furnished at th< 
school, or wantonly injures any school property, he shall pay for th< 
same. 



superintendent's report. 63 

6. If any student intends to withdraw from the school before the 
close of the term, he will please give due notice to the principal. 

7. Teachers shall keep a complete record of the attendance of the 
different departments of the school : and the principal shall make returns 
of the same to the Superintendent of Schools at the close of each school 
month. 

They shall be the custodians of the property belonging to the school, 
and deliver the same into the hands of the Superintendent of Schools at 
the close of the school. 

They shall also see that the regulations of the school are observed. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

The reports for the year from this school show a slight 
increase in attendance. The average daily attendance for 
1889 was 305 ; for 1890, 315.T. The number of pupils 
who entered from the lower schools last September was 
140; the class that graduated in June numbered 61 ; the 
withdrawals for other causes during the year were 66. 

At the close of the school year in June Miss Emma H. 
Wheeler resigned her position as teacher in the school to 
study another profession. The vacancy was filled by the 
advancement of Miss Helen L. Hadley, a teacher of the 
Fifth grade in the Fifth street grammar school. Also 
owing to the size of the class in September it was thought 
necessary to place another assistant in the school. The 
choice of the Board was Miss Mabel W. Cleaveland, who 
l^ad taught a number of years in the Middle street gram- 
"^ar school. Both of these teachers have entered upon 
their new duties with an earnestness and enthusiasm that 

• 

ensures success. 

Some modifications have been made in the course of 
study during the year. The course in arithmetic has been 
changed slightly that it might be more in line with the 
general plan of instruction pursued in this study in the 
elementary schools ; English history and geology have 
°een added to the electives of the last year ; the course in 
drawing, which was formerly compulsory for the four 



64 superintendent's report. 

years, is now elective for the last two. I think these 
changes will prove beneficial to the school, and am of the 
opinion that it would be well to make drawing an elective 
after the first year, when the course now projected in the 
schools is in full operation. Under the new regulation 
relating to drawing, which went into operation in Septem- 
ber last, twenty-four pupils in Class I. elected it, and 
sixteen in Class II. 

The principal of the school in speaking of the discipline 
says, "In respect to discipline, the aim of the school is to 
train the pupils to self control, and to the voluntary practice 
of the moral virtues." This most assuredly is the true 
object of school discipline, and if the means employed to 
secure it are in harmony with the avow^ed principle the 
results will certainly be good. The tone of the school is 
wholesome. The teachers command the respect of the 
pupils, and the pupils that of the teachers. Cases of dis- 
cipline have occurred, in dealing with which the teachers 
have possibly placed themselves in a position to be criti- 
cised ; there have been pupils also who have not been 
touched with the spirit of the school ; but these instances 
are the exceptions and not the rule. 

Comparatively little complaint has been made during the 
year of too great exactions being demanded in lessons ; 
in fact, much less than usual. High schools are criticised 
quite generally for over-pressure. The arguments pro and 
con have been gone over too often to need repetition here. 
I think there is as little real ground for such criticism 
against the High school here as can be expected. When 
any complaint has been made it has received attention, 
and if it seemed a just one after investigation, it was reme- 
died if possible. 

The instruction as a whole is thorough and in accord 
with the advanced ideas of the day. The teaching is not 
free, however, from two faults which are common to schools 



superintendent's report. 65 

in general. First, too much of the recitation time is occu- 
pied by the teachers and not enough by the pupils ; second, 
too much subject-matter is frequently presented to the 
pupils at a recitation. The two are closely related and 
those teachers who indulge in the first are prone to the 
second. They are often the ones who possess a thorough 
mastery of the branches they teach, and are so enthusias- 
tic concerning them, that they are not conscious of the 
amount of time they occupy in discussing them, and fail to 
measure the receptive powers of their pupils. 

In the Report last year I devoted some space to a dis- 
cussion of the movement by which a more practical turn is 
being given to high school instruction in many places by 
incorporating in the course a manual training or mechanic 
arts department. I quoted at some length from the testi- 
mony of those who know from personal experience of the 
success of such a departure. This movement is con- 
stantly gaining ground, and each year there are new 
places that put the experiment into operation. I consider 
the matter sufficiently important to again direct the atten- 
tion of the Board to it, and trust that at least it will be 
^aken under advisement. A city of our resources can 
afford to be a pioneer in such matters and not a simple 
follower. 

By the kindness of the principal, Mr. Huling, I am able 
^0 present here certain facts of interest regarding the recent 
graduates of the school and an outline of the course of 
study with explanatory notes by him. His recommenda- 
l^on under section 4 I would most heartily second. If our 
High school is to fit pupils for college let it be done most 
thoroughly, and that is not possible with the average pupil 
^^ the time now allotted the course. 

STATISTICS. 
*• Kuniber of pupils who graduated from the school last June who are 

9 



66 superintendent's report. 

pursuing higher or supple men tar3^ courses of iustruetion, 
follows : 

At Howard Medical University, 1 

At Harrington Training school, 12 

At Swain Free school, 10 

At ottier institutions or by private instruction, 3 

2. Number expecting to enter Brown University in September, 18? 

not included in above, 
Number expecting to enter a medical institute in Septembi 
1891, 

3. Number post-graduates connected with school during year, 

4. Number pupils taking classical course at present, 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. GENERAL COURSE. 

First Year — Class IV. 

English, 40. English, 40. 

Algebra, 40. Algebra, 40. 

History (Greece and Rome), 20. History (General), 40. 
Latin, 40. 

Second Year — Class II I . 

English, 40. English, 40. 

Geometry, 40. Geometry, 40. 

Latin, 40. Latin, 40, or 

Greek, 40 (if needed). Physiology, 20; Book-keepir 



rt\ 



Third Year — Class 11. 

English, 40. English, 40. 

Latin, 40. Latin, 40. 

French, 40, or French, 40 (optional). 

German, 40. German, 40 (optional). 

Greek, 40 (if needed). Zoology, 20, and Botany, 2 

Physics, 40 (if needed). tional). 

Physics, 40 (required of the 
optional for the girls). 

Fourth Year — Class 1. 

English, 40. English, 40. 

Latin, 40. Latin, 40 (optional). 

French, 40, or French, 40 '* 

German, 40. German, 40 ^' 



superintendent's report. 67 

Physics, 40 (if needed). Chemistry, 40 (optional). 

Greek, 40 (if needed). English History, 20, and Civil Gov- 

Keviews, 40. ernnient, 20 (optional). 

Geology, 20, and Astronomy, 20 
(optional). 

NOTES. 

1. The figures appended show the number of weeks each subject is 
pursued within the school vear. 

2. Recitations in the studies named above occur four (rarely five) 
times a week. In addition, lessons in arithmetic, drawing, and singing 
we given once a week. There are also exercises in free gymnastics for 
&n nearly every day, and in military science for the boys once a week. 

3. lectures are given to all students of Class III. upon physiology 
^th special reference to the effects of stimulants and narcotics. 

^- In the Classical Course, the studies will be varied in accordance 
^iththe requirements of the college cliosen. Only those pupils who are 
exceptionally strong in intellect and health can completely satisfy the 
<leiDand8 of the best colleges in four years; hence, in most cases, a fifth 
(post-graduate) year of study is recommended. 

5. In the General Course, each student is expected to pursue three 
"liiin studies. A fourth study may be taken if, in the judgment of the 
^ncipal, the circumstances warrant such a step. English is a required 
study throughout the course ; algebra, histor}-, and geometry are required 
each for a single year. In the first year there are no optional studies. 
^D the second year the choice lies between Latin on the one hand, and 
physiology, followed by book-keeping, on the other. In the third year 
physics is required of all the boys, and is optional for the girls; Latin, 
'fench, German, and zoology, followed by botany, are optional for all. 
^n the fourth year all the studies except English are optional. Latin, 

'^fench, and German, however, if once begun, must be continued two 

years. 

6. An average of 70 per cent, in scholarship is requisite for promo- 
tion and graduation. 

"• The work in English occupies one third of the student's time con- 
tinuously for the four years. It follows, in general, four lines : the princi- 
P'*8 of composition and rhetoric, practice in composing, the reading 
*t»d study of literature, and the biography of authors. These are pur- 
sued pari passu throughout the course, but in varying proportions at 
''Afferent periods. In the first year two fifths of the time is occupied in 
language work, including exercise writing, with a little technical gram- 
^^^' The remainder is given to the reading of specimens of general 
•terature and the study for a considerable period of a longer work, as 



68 superintendent's report. 

Irving'8 Sketch Book« Longfellow's Evaugeline, nnd Franklin's Auto- 
biography, hi the second year one fifth of the time is devoted to 
rhetorical work, with occasional exercises, and four fifths to the reading 
and study of specimens of American literature. About a dozen authors 
are dwelt upon with considerable care, and others more lightly. Three 
works are studied for a longer period, viz.: Whittier's Snow Bound, 
I^weirs Sir Launfai, and Emerson's Essays. In the third year similar 
work is done upon the most important writers of English literature. 
Some dozen authors are taken up quite critically and numerous others 
with less fullness. The pieces of literature themselves are examined, 
annotated, and discussed, portions of them are committed to memory, 
and the opinions of contemporary and modern critics are referred to. 
In the fourth year essentially similar work is carried on, but with more 
minute criticism and more thoughtful discussion. It is based upon 
Shakespeare's Hamlet, Merchant of Venice, and Midsummer Night's 
Dream, Byron's Childe Harold, and Milton's Paradise Lost (in part). 
In studying Shakespeare the whole setting of the Elizabethan era is 
brought out, — the history of the time, the state of society, the idioms in 
common use, for instance; and so with the other poems. Attention U 
given also to the structure and growth of the English language. 
Throughout the course monthly compositions are required, many o1 
which are corrected with the pupil at the teacher's side; also short 
extracts are committed to memory and recited. The aim of the whole 
course is to develop in the pupil facility and accuracy of expression bj 
tongue and pen, and also an appreciative acquaintance with the best in 
American and English literature. 

8. In arithmetic the weekly lessons are designed to keep the pupils 
familiar with processes learned elsewhere and to supplement deficiences 
The work is distributed over the four years thus : 

Clans IV. 1. Reviews as follows: Percentage and its application t< 
Profit and Loss, Commission, Simple Interest, Commercial Discount 
and Hank Discount. 2. New subjects : Compound Interest, the prin- 
ciple involved and its application to a few simple examples. 3. Drill 
Class exercise each week for a few minutes in adding long columns o: 
figures; business forms. 

Class III. 1. Reviews as follows: Examples from time to time, ii 
the subjects taught in Class IV., Taxes, Insurance, Partnership. 2 
New subjects: Partial Payments, U. S. rule and a few examples ir 
application ; Involution and Evolution. 8. Drill : As in Class IV^. 

Class II. 1. Reviews: Examples from time to time in the subjecti 
previously taught, especially in Percentage, Simple Interest, Commercia 
and Bank Discount, Ratio and Simple Proportion. 2. New subjects 
Compound Proportion, Custom House Business, Stocks, Exchange 
3. Drill : As before. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 69 

Class I, 1. Metric System. 2. Mensuration. 3. General reviews. 

Simple interest is computed hereafter in all classes by the followinfi: 

rule: 

Find the interest for 60 days at 6 per cent, by talcing 0.01 of the prin- 
cipal. For other periods of time take convenient multiples or aliquot 
parts of the interest for GO days. 

In al/^ebra the students are usually carried to radical expressions. In 
geometry the pupils are led to use the definitions and axioms* when 
acquired, in tracing logical conclusions from given premises, within the 
range of plane geometry. Original demonstrations are encouraged from 
the outset. Advanced courses in algebra and geometry are given to 
students preparing for higher institutions. 

9. In physics and chemistry, experiment by the pupils is relied upon 
In work involving the conditions necessary to produce given phenomena 
and also that involving measurements. Principles are brought out by 
the teacher with illustrative experiments. The text-book is used for 
subsequent applications of the principles and for reviews. Observed 
results are recorded by the pupil in his note book, which, after correc- 
tion by the teacher, furnishes material for recitations. Reference books 
are freelv used. Two laboratorv exercises, two recitations, and a lee- 
ture ordinarily make up a week's work. One division of the physics 
claw pursues the course of forty experiments required for admission to 
Harvard College. 

10. Zoology and botany are so taught as to secure close and exact 
examination of specimens, by dissections and analysis, and the develop- 
ment of logical thought and expression. After personal observation 
^ith the nece!*8ary implements, books and pictures are consulted ; then 
drawinjrg are made and the results of the pupils' observations are sysr 
tematically arranged and recorded. Recitations are based upon these 
obstrvHtions, as well as upon lectures and text-books. 

n. I^tin is begun the first year by those alone who intend to enter 
allege; other students begin this subject the second year. In the 
**<?Kinning class the aim is to master the declensions and conjugationsi 
to learn the principles of construction, and to build up a limited vocab- 
^^^ry. In the second year Caisar is read, with grammatical reviews 
*nd weekly exercises in composition. In the third year attention is 
Ifiven to Vergil and in the fourth to Cicero. Exercises in composition 
•wisijfht reading are frequent. In Greek the first year's work has the 
s^iMe aim as that of the first vear in Latin : th^f second and third are 
Riven to Xenophon and Homer (with Herodotus, when needed) and to 
^ork in prose composition. 

^'^' In the two years devoted to the study of French and German the 
instruction aims to secure a thorough knowledge of elementary gram- 
naar. an ability to understand the spoken language, a readiness of cor- 



70 superintendent's report. 

rect and idiomatic expression upon simple subjects, and an ability to 
translate into English, and from English into French or German. 

13. The study of general history occupies the first year. The objects 
sought are the encouragement of independent thought, the arrangement 
in compact and logical order of the facts under consideration, the com- 
prehension of the purpose underlying words and acts, and the applica- 
tion of the lessons of the past to the present. A large collection of pic- 
tures has been gathered and is in constant use to heighten vividness of 
impression. Map drawing is brought in to secure definiteness in the 
location of historical places. Selections from historical novels and 
standard histories are introduced to develop a taste for historical read- 
ing. Students preparing for higher institutions, in their last year sup- 
plement this outline with a fuller course. In the last year, also, there is 
an optional course in English history, based on the text-book and on 
class discussion. 

14. The course in astronomy is descriptive rather than mathematical 
and is based on the text-book, together with observations taken through 
a telescope having a six-inch objective. A smaller telescope is also 
used by the pupils for work without personal oversight, as in the draw- 
ing of sun-spots. 

15. In geology instruction with the aid of the text-book is given in 
the historical and structural branches of the subject. In addition the 
pupils are taught by laboratory practice to identify the common New 
England rocks and subsequently to make collections of specimens col- 
lected and identified by themselves. Some thirty-five specimens were 
thus treated by each pupil in the last class. 

16. The half-year in civil government, coming at the very end of the 
course, is intended to be a direct preparation for citizenship. The gen- 
eral principles of government are first examined. Then the origin and 
history of the New England colonies are reviewd. Next the consti- 
tution of Massachusetts is discussed, together with the details of town, 
city, and county management. Finally the constitution of the United 
States is taken up. At proper stages the pupils are taken to observe 
the legislature, the city council, and the superior court in session, and 
in general the study is made as objective as the conditions warrant. 

17. In respect to discipline, the aim of the school is to train the 
pupils to self control, and to the voluntary practice of the moral virtues. 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. 

The object of this school, the course of study pursued 
by the pupil teachers, the regulations governing it, the 
terms of admission to it, — all these were given in las 



superintendent's report. 7 1 

jears Report. It remains but to speak of its present con- 
dition and what has been accomplished in it during the 
year past. 

The school completes its existence of a year and a half 
the first of February, 1891, when the first class to complete 
the lull course will graduate. A class of five was gradu- 
ated last February, and one of eight in June. All of these 
young ladies are now teaching in the schools and in most 
cases are rendering acceptable service. These classes 
were composed of young ladies who were on the waiting 
list of teachers when the school was organized and many 
of them had had more or less experience in teaching 
before entering it. 

Those who graduate from the school are given diplomas 
and placed on the approved list of teachers, and, when 
appointed to regular positions, are given second year's pay. 
A few have been refused diplomas who have not reached 
the requirements. 

Besides teaching the three hundred children who attend 
the school, the pupil teachers are required to act as substi- 
tutes when the regular teachers in other schools are absent, 
provided there are no graduates available. As will be 
seen by the statistics at the end of this article, there were 
inany requisitions on the school for substitutes the past 
year. This made it exceedingly hard for the principal 
and her assistant ; for they were often compelled to do 
double duty. It was also trying to those pupil teachers 
who were obliged to be out of the school for weeks at a 
time and yet maintain their standing. The same condition 
of things is not likely to occur again, and the school will 
not probably be called upon in the future so frequently for 
substitutes as to cramp the work there. 

Notwithstanding all the difficulties that the school had 
^ contend with, the interests of the children who attend 
It Were well cared for. The principal and her assistant 



72 superintendent's report. 

were compelled to neglect somewhat their normal work 
with the pupil teachers in order to effect this ; but first of 
all the interests of the pupils are considered in conduct- 
ing the school. The good methods employed in teaching 
and the careful oversight exercised by those in charge, 
more than compensate in the teaching for the frequent 
changes of teachers and their comparative inexperience. 
And I am convinced that the immediate results obtained 
here compare favorably with the best of the other schools 
in the city, while more attention is given than in many of 
the schools to developing those powers which will aid the 
pupils in the future. 

The order is good, and while it would not be at all 
strange if there were more breaches of discipline than in 
other schools having permanent teachers, I do not find it so. 
Stress is constantly laid upon the necessity of teaching the 
pupils to act from right motives, and the effect is apparent 
in the general good tone that pervades the school. 

The special teachers in music and drawing visit this 
school each week, dividing their time between the regular 
pupils and the pupil teachers. It is essential that the lat- 
ter acquire a good knowledge of the methods employed in 
teaching these subjects, that they may put them into prac- 
tice not only in the Training school but in the positions they 
are to fill in the future. The hour each week that the 
special teachers give to the pupil teachers cannot bt 
better employed for the general good of the schools. 

The school is in excellent condition and is doing wel 
the work for which it was instituted. If the Board con- 
tinues the same policy in administering it that it has hereto- 
fore pursued, there is no question but it will prove a pow- 
erful instrument in making the whole school system mort 
effective. It may be necessary to regulate the size of tht 
entrance classes in order to have the school work to tht 
best advantage and to be maintained at the least neces- 



superintendent's report. 73 

sary expense. The entering classes each February will 
undoubtedly be larger than those entering each September 
unless some action is taken by the Board regulating the 
size of the entering classes. For example, the entering 
class last September consisted of but two, while twelve or 
fourteen are expected in February. This results from the 
graduates of the High school (from whence most of the 
candidates come) preferring to wait six months after grad- 
uating before taking the entrance examinations. 

It will happen, then, that there will at times be very small 
Senior classes, necessitating the temporary assignments of 
some of the graduates of the school as teachers, while the 
Junior classes will be unnecessarily large. By limiting the 
entrance classes to eight or nine, selecting this number by 
rank at each examination from the candidates taking it 
(provided more than thai number present themselves and 
pass at any one time), and giving those who have passed 
the examination the preference at the next assignment over 
those taking the examination later, the difficulty might in a 
great measure be overcome. 

The number of different persons who visited this school 
during the year attests the interest that is taken in it. 
These schools are multiplying throughout the countrjsand 
there is scarcely a New England city of any importance 
that does not boast of one. These vary in efficiency, how- 
ever ; those in the larger and wealthier cities excelling by 
virtue of the broader basis upon which they are founded 
and the advantages that they receive. There is nothing 
to prevent this one from being the very best, and I am con- 
fident that it needs but the experience of a year or two 
more to become so, if it has not already attained that 
distinction. 



ID 



2 

i5 



74 superintendent's report. 

STATISTICS FOR YEAR. 

Number pupil teacherfi enrolled during the year, .32 

Number pupil teachers admitted in February, 5 
Number pupil teachers admitted in September, 
Number pupil teachers graduated in February, 

Number pupil teachers graduated in June, 8 

Number pupil teachers in Senior clasf», Dec. 20, 1890, 8 

Number pupil teachers in Junior class, Dec. 20, 1890, 6 

Number pupil teachers in Sub-,Tunior class, Dec. 20, 1890, 2 

Number days' substituting by pupil teachers, 193 

Number davs' absence for other causes, 195 

Total number days' absence by pupil teachers, ;J8S 

Number different persons who visited school, 2.5K 

Number different visits made the school, 589 

Average dailj'^ attendance of pupil teachers, 17 

Average daily attendance of Senior and Junior classes, 13 

Average nimiber of pupils belonging to the school. 294 

SPECIAL BRANCHES OF STUDY. 

Music. — The work in this study was somewhat interrupted 
during the year by a change of supervisor. Mr. Diman 
resigned the position that he had held for a number of 
years as instructor in this branch. He had been divid- 
ing his time for some months between the schools here 
and those of another place. The Board felt that the 
whole time of a male teacher of this subject was needed 
here. Mr. Diman did not care to accept the proposition 
made to him by the Board and it became necessary to find 
another teacher. 

The choice of the Board was Mr. F. H. Butterfield of 
Washington, D. C. Mr. Butterfield is a teacher of long 
and successful experience. He held the position of super- 
visor of music in Washington when he was called here. 
He entered upon his work with us about the first of Octo- 
ber. While his methods differ somewhat from those of 
his predecessor, he is familiar not only with his own 
special subject but with educational principles in general, 
and applies them to his teaching. It is not yet time to 



superintendent's report. 75 

judge of the results, but I am confident from what I have 
already observed that the instruction in music in our 
schools will continue to be most efficient. 

Drawing, — The instruction in this subject has been in 
an unsettled condition so long that satisfactory results are 
not produced and as yet can scarcely be expected. Mis- 
fortune has seemed to pursue this branch. It is not to be 
wondered at that the regular teachers feel less confidence 

• 

Jn teaching it than any other. No plan has been followed 
in quick succession by several plans, and it is to be devoutly 
hoped that the present one possesses at least the elements 
of permanency, and that the present special teachers will 
be able to put it into successful operation. 

Miss Florence A. Cleaves now has charge of the subject 
in the High school. Miss Adelaide B. Hyde, who had 
charge of the work in the elementary grades for one year, 
was granted leave of absence for the fall term on 
account of failing health. She has been obliged on 
account of her health to resign her position, and will be 
succeeded by Miss Blanche I. George of Boston. Before 
resigning Miss Hyde prepared a complete scheme of draw- 
ing for all the grades which is now on trial. It will 
undoubtedly be followed in the future with slight modifi- 
cations. 

Both Miss Cleaves and Miss George have received thor- 
ough training for their work, and if there are no interrup- 
tions for several years, they will be able, I am confident, to 
give this study a value in our school curriculum that it has 
not yet attained. 

Sewing, — No change has occurred in the methods of 
conducting this branch of instruction during the year in 
the teaching force. 

While recognizing the importance of this work, the 
amount of good that is accomplished by it, and the faith- 
fulness of the present teachers, I feel that there are some 



76 superintendent's report. 

things in the present methods of conducting it that migl 
be improved and trust the matter may be taken under coi 
sideration. 

PEDAGOGICAL LIBRARY. 

This library was established some two years ago that th 
teachers might have access to a number of books relatin 
to the historv of education, the science and art of teacl 
ing, and kindred subjects. 

It is located at the office of the Superintendent < 
Schools. It now contains 152 volumes, and others are : 
be added from time to time. A complete list of the boot 
that were in the library when the last Annual Report wj 
issued, was given in it. Those that have been adde 
since are given in this connection. 

The teachers have patronized the library to quite 2 
extent, thereby showing their appreciation of it. Tvs 
hundred thirty books have been taken out by them sine 
it was formed. 

But this does not measure the amount of profession 
reading done by the teachers. Many of them own bool 
of their own on educational subjects, are regular sul 
scribers to educational papers, patronize the Public Librar 
and also are supplied with books and papers from tl 
Rowland fund ; all of these means they use for improvir 
their special and general knowledge. 

List of books added to library within the year 1890 : 

No. Title. Author. 

137. Courses and Methods Prince. 

138. Pestalozzi : His Life and Work Dc Grunips. 

139. Elementary Psychology Baker. 

140. Linder's Empirical Psychology De Garmo. 

141. The Manual Training School Wooiiward. 

142. Introduction to Shakespeare Corson. 

143. Teachers' Manual of Geography Redvvay. 



superintendent's report. 77 

145. Insecta Hyatt. 

146. School Hygiene Newsholme. 

147. AstroQornical Geography Jacksou. 

148. Nineteenth Century Authors Hodgkins. 

149. The Reproduction of Geographical Forms. . . Redway. 

150. Natural History Object Lessons Ricks. 

151. Essentials of Method De Garrao. 

152. Industrial Education Seidel. 

NO SESSION OF SCHOOLS. 

In order to have some definite arrangement by which 
parents and teachers may be notified when it is thought 
best to have no session of the schools in the morning or to 
dispense with the afternoon session, the following vote was 
passed by the Board at its regular November meeting : 
"\^oted, That the Superintendent of Schools be empow- 
ered to consult with the Chief Engineer of the Fire 
Department, and arrange, if possible, for a system of 
alarms to be struck by order of the Superintendent of 
Schools when in his judgment there should be no session 
of the schools on account of the weather — this vote to 
apply to the grammar and primary grades only, and not 
to the High school or country schools." 

In accordance with the above vote an arrangement was 
made with the proper officers of the Fire Department and 
the following system of signals agreed upon, notice of 
which was sent to teachers and parents : — The signal 22 
(that is, two strokes, an interval, and the two strokes 
repeated) sounded on the fire alarm at 8.15 a. m., will 
indicate no school in the primary and grammar grades in 
the forenoon. 

The same signal sounded at 12.45 p. m. will indicate 
no school in the primary and grammar grades in the after- 
noon. 

If the signal is sounded at 8.15 a. m. and not repeated 
at 12.45 p. M., there will be a school session in the after- 
noon. 



78 



superintendent's report. 



This regulation does not apply to the High school or 
the country schools. 

It is not always possible to forecast the weather, and 
therefore no-sessions are ordered at times when it appears 
later that it would have been better to have had school ; 
and, again, the signal is sometimes not struck when the 
weather an hour later would have demanded it. The sig- 
nals must be struck at just such times and a decision one 
way or the other must be made some minutes before. It 
should be remembered always that whatever action is 
taken the good only of the majority of the pupils is 
considered. 



NATIONAL FLAGS FOR THE SCHOOL. 

I should be remiss in my duty if I closed this Report 
without making proper acknowledgment of the gifts of the 
national flags that a number of our schools have received 
from several of their generous and patriotic friends. 

The Harrington Training school was the recipient of a 
fine flag and staff* from the William Logan Rodman Post, 
G. A. R. They were presented on Memorial Day by the 
Post with public exercises which were witnessed by a large 
audience. The presentation speech was made by Hon. 
Thomas W. Cook. His Honor Mayor Clifford accepted 
the flag in behalf of the Board with the eloquence 
and appropriateness of speech that characterize his public 
utterances. The exercises were impressive and instructive. 

The other schools that have received flags, with the 
names of their donors, are as follows : 



Thompson street school, 
Dartmouth street school, 
Middle street school, 
Acushnet school, 



Gen. J. D. Thompson. 

Jonathan Howland, .Jr. 

Messrs. Sanders & Barrows. 

Messrs. Brownell & Murkland. 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 79 

The Board expressed its appreciation of these gifts by 
suitable action in each case. The pupils and teachers in 
these favored schools are interested in these flags and proud 
of them. 

These national emblems floating day after day above the 
school houses are object lessons of importance. Every 
child should be taught the significance of the flag and 
what it represents in our national life ; should be made to 
ftel that it is the duty of every American citizen to love 
and defend it and all that it symbolizes. 

CONCLUSION. 

Teachers' meetings have been held throughout the year 
both by me and by the special teachers. We have not 
been favored, however, by addresses from educators of 
other places as in the past. I hope that arrangements may 
be made the coming year for a number to be delivered to 
the teachers on topics bearing directly upon the school 
work. They would be stimulating and helpful. 

I had intended before this time to have issued the 
complete course of study for all the grades of the schools ; 
but various causes have prevented. While the teachers 
are now working on the general line to be followed in this 
new course there are yet some important matters to be 
determined upon before it would be well to print it. There 
seems to be no good reason why it cannot be issued by the 
beginning of the next school year. 

In closing, I wish to express to the members of the 

Committee my appreciation of the counsel and aid that 

they have so willingly accorded me at all times ; also to 

extend to the teachers my hearty thanks for their cordial 

cooperation in my eflforts to elevate the standard of the 

schools. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WM. E. HATCH, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



8o 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



List of Teachers. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Grade. Kesldence. 

Kay Greone Ruling, Priucipal, 1U5 Cottage street, 
Chas. T. Bonuey,Jr., Sub-Master, 121 Washington '' 
Chas. R. Allen, Science Teacher, 1 Lincoln 

1 Sarah D. Ottiwell, 74 Keujpton 

2 Elizabeth P. Briggs, 306 Union 

2 Lydia J. Cranston, 81 North 

3 Lucretia N. Smith, 72 Foster 
3 Mary E. Austin, 214 Kempton 

3 Mabel A. Spooner, 12 Morgan 

4 Helen L. Hadley, 196 Grinnell 
4 Eraina K. Shaw, 72 High 
4 Mabel W. Cleaveland, 81 North 

Florence A. Cleaves, Drawing Teacher, 35 Eighth 
John K. McAfee, Military Instructor, 72 School 



i( 



II 



Wk 



i4 



ii 



ii 



(I 



kk 



l( 



Ik 



Ik 



Salary. 

82,750 

1,6IK) 

1,500 

1,000 

000 

JKX) 

900 

900 

500 

650 

800 

()50 

550 

30(> 



GRAMMAR 

Fifth Street: 

Allen F. Wood, Principal, 
5 Lydia A. Macreading, 

5 Harriet F. Hart, 

6 Mary E. Allen, 

6 Sarah E. Stoddard, 

7 Nancy H. Brooks, 

7 .Fanet Hunter, 

8 Mary A. Kane, 

8 Blanche W. Sheldon, 

9 Grace L. Carver, 

9 I/cna B. Chubbuck, 

Middle Street: 



5 
6 
6 

7 

8 
8 
9 
9 



George H. Tripp, Principal, 
Agnes J. Dunlap, 
Katharine Comraerford, 
Etta M. Abbott, 
Lucy B. Fish, 
l,ucy D. Ashley, 
Clara B. Watson, 
Maria B. Clark, 
Mary R. Hinckley, 
Clara S. Vincent, 



SCHOOLS. 






Ill Acushnet ; 


nv.. 


1,800 


17 Bonuey street. 


,550 


2:^3 Acushnet 


av.. 


550 


25 Madison street, 


550 


3.52 County 




550 


1.X5 Fourth 




5.50 


55 No. Sixth 




550 


157 Grinnell 




.550 


169 Union 




480 


147 Acushnet 


av.. 


450 


148 Purchase St., 


550 


I, Fairhaven. 




1,800 


117 Hillman street. 


550 


634 County 


tb 


550 


103 School 


a 


550 


64 Smith 


( k 


550 


619 County 


(fc 


550 


37 Fifth 


i( 


550 


131 Chestnut 


(t 


550 


111 High 


fck 


550 


233 Middle 


b( 


550 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



8l 



Parker Street: 

Grade. 



o 
5 

a 

6 
t 
7 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 
9 
9 



Charles E. E. Mosher, Principal, 

Emma A. McAfee, 

Anna I^. Jennings, 

Mary E. 8turtevant, 

Emma B. McCuUough, 

Martha A. He men way, 

H. Jennie Kirby, 

Josephine Almy, 

May L. Pettey, 

Mariana N. Richmond, 

Emma B. Allen, 

Lizzie E. Omey, 

Emily A. Delano, 

Anna 1. Dexter, 



ReHideuce. 
92 High St., 
72 School St., 
115 Maxfleld St., 
220 Summer st., 
i^OO Purchase St., 

5 Lincoln St., 
Ill Summer St., 
201 Cottage St., 
22 Pope St., 
34 High St., 

Morgan St., 
63 Thomas St., 

East Free tow 
11 Franklin St., 



n 



Salary. 

$2,000 
550 
550 
550 
475 
550 
500 
550 
550 
525 
525 
475 
500 
450 



Thompson Street : 



7 

8 
8 
9 
9 



Katharine N. Lapham, Principal, Cor. Union &■ Sixth sts., 825 



Abby F. Sullivan, 
Cora B. Cleaveland, 
Mary A. Macy, 
Leonora B. Hamblin, 



230 County St., 550 

81 North St., 425 

72 Bedford St., 550 

141 Washington St., 450 



Harrington Training School : 



4<>4 County St., 1,300 
019 County st., 700 



Josephine B. Stuart, Principal, 
Anna VV. Braley, 
Fourteen Training teachers, — eight Seniors, ^4.(K) per 
week; six Juniors, ^.00 per week. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



AcusHNET Avenue: 



10 


Jane E. Gilmore, Principal, 


245 Acushnet av., 


600 


11 


Sarah E. Kirwin, 


101 So. Sixth St., 


500 


12 


Helen C. Allen, 


173 Grinnell st.. 


500 


12 


Clara C. M. Gage, 


78 Mill St., 


475 


13 


Susan M. Lucas, 


167 North st.. 


500 


13 


Carrie S. Silva, 


81 Washington st. 


,450 




Rachel L. Denham, 


366 Cottage St., 


400 


Cedar Street : 






10 


Annie S. Homer, Principal, 


117 Hillman St., 


575 


11 


Bessie P. Peirce, 


124 Hillman St., 


500 


12 


Abby D. Whitney, 


59 Hill St., 


500 


13 


WilletUi B. Nickerson, 


64 Allen St., 


500 


13 


Annie L. Edwards, 
II 


62 North St., 


475 



\ 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



85 



Cei>ar Grove Street: 

Allen F. Wood, 
Robert Washburn, 
Annie G. Brawley, 
(irace L. Carver, 
Myra A. Leach, 
Nannie P. Slocuni, 
Daisy M. Butts, 
Addie J. McFarlin, 
Mary K. Hinckley, 
Abby R. Johnson, 
Lydia A. Macreading, 
Sarah E. Kirwin, 
IJzzie Bennett, 
Susie P. Diman, 
('arrie A. Shaw, 

Merrimac Street : 

Joseph P. Kennedy, 
Hegina M. Paul, 
Edith M. Weeden, 
Bessie P. Peirce, 
Janet Hunter, 



Salary. 
$12.00 per week. 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.,50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 



10.00 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 



vr.y- ]r • • .- 



. . I 
I 



Ti. -J. v 



' ■ * 



m 




HIQH SCHOOL. 






ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Citv of Xew Hedford, 



TOUfrrilKK WITH THK 



K 



Superintendent's Annual Report, 



FOR THE YEAR 1891. 



NEW llKDKnKn: 
E. AHTH<(l>r A HOM*. Invorii., City Phi 



In SrnooL Committkk, 

J:in. 5, \s\)'2. 

Voted, Tliiit lli(» Secretary is hereby instructed to pre- 
pare the Animal Report of the School Board, and that 
1200 copie?s of the >anie be printed. 



Report of the Secretary. 



By direction of the School Committee, I submit to our 
fellow-citizen« the following Report for the year 1891. 

STATISTICS. 

I. POPULATION AND VALUATION. 

'Hie population of the city (census of 1880) was 26,875 

The population of the city (census of 1890) was 40,705 

Estimated population of the city (Dec. 31, 1891) is 44,000 

Valuation of taxable property (1891) was 38,518,943.00 

I[. SCHOOL CENSUS. 

'"^hool census, May, 1890, (children between 5 and 15 years 
/^' age), 6,833 

•Vaocj] census, May, 1891. (childrtMi between 5 and 15 years 
"^ Jige), 7,891 

luer^j^g during year, (children between 5 and 15 years of age), 1,058 

SCHOOL CENSUS BY WARDS. 





1890. 


1891. 


Gain 


^^'*»"«1 One, 


2.007 


2,530 


52;^ 


^^rU Two. 


713 


710 


3 


^'a«Xj Three, 


677 


(>98 


21 


^^'^ra Four, 


439 


452 


13 


^s^rdFive. 


(J86 


761 




^'»rd Six, 


2,311 


2,734 


423 



6,833 7,891 1,058 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



LOCATION or CHILDREN BETWEEN 5 AND 15 YEARS OP AGK, AS 

REPORTED BY CENSUS OFFICERS. 





AttendltiK 
Public Schools. 


AttendlnK Private and 
Parochial Schools. 


Attending 
no School. 


Ward One, 


907 


1,029 


534 


Ward Two, 


441 


174 


101 


Ward Three, 


591 


34 


73 


Ward Four, 


;W7 


39 


66 


Ward Five, 


532 


136 


93 


Ward Six, 


1,788 


464 


492 



4,666 



1,866 



1,359 



REMARKS ON THE CENSUS. 



The rapid growth of the city is evidenced by the school 
census given above. Within a year the increase in the 
number of children in the city, between the ages of 5 and 
15, has been 1058. While the compulsory age of school 
attendance in this State is from 8 to 14, children are re- 
ceived into the schools at 5 years of age, the majority 
beginning between the ages of 5 and f). The majority of 
the pupils in the upper grade grammar and the High 
school are over 14 vears old. The basis for the school 
census, then, throughout the State, is not the compulsory 
school age, but the i)eriod from 5 to 15 years of age, and 
the distribution of State aid to the small and })oor towns 
is based on the school census. 

The statistics of school attendance show that the in- 
crease in the immber of children in the city has been pro- 
portionately felt in the schools. There were 530 more 
pupils enrolled for the year 1891 than for the year 1890. 
In the above table giving the number of pupils who were 
reported l)y the census officers as attending or not attend- 
ing school at the time the census was taken, 23 per cent, 
are reported as attending private and parochial schools, 
and 17 per cent, as attending no school. It must not be 
inferred from this, however, that the 17 per cent, have 
not attended school at all, or will not. This number in- 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OK THE 



Citv of XevsT Heniford, 



TOGETHER WITH TICK 






Superintendent s Annual Report, 



FOR THE YEAR 1891. 



NEW BKDFORD: 
E. Ahthonv * SONS, Incorp., CrxY Printkkm. 

1892. 






b SCHOOL REPORT. 

VI. TEACHERS. 

Whole number in service, December 18, 1891 : 

High school, 14 

Training school, 17 

Grammar schools, 40 

EMmary schools, 60 

Country schools. 7 

Mill schools, 4 

Special teachers, 5 

Temporary assistants, 2 

Evening schools, 51 

Totol. 200 



VII. PUPILS. 

DAY SCHOOLS, 1891. 

Whole number pupils enrolled of all ages, (j.383 

Average number pupils belonging, 5,024 

Average daily attendance. 4,521 

Per cent, of attendance. 90 

Number of half-days* absem^e. 185.481 

Number cnses of tardnie.4s, 13,574 

Number cases of dismissal, 14,938 

Number cases truancy reported by tcach«M-s, 197 

Number cases corporal punishment. 901 

Half-days' absence of teachers, 721 

Number cases tardiness by teachers. 135 

Number visits made the schools by superintendent. 565 

Number visits made the schools by committee, 777 

Number visits made the schools by parents and others, 2,938 



KVKNING SCHO<^LS. 



Whole number pui>ils enrolle*!. 
Average number belonging, 
Average nightly attendance. 
Per cent, of attendance. 
Total nights* absence, 
Number cases tardiness. 
Number visits by committee. 



lioyn. 


GirlH. 


Total. 


1.380 


Gr»2 


2.042 

903 

«78 

75 

12,917 

2,13« 

120 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



EVENING DRAWING .SCHOOL. 



Whole number pupils enrolled, 

Average number belongin^s^, 

Average nightly attendance, 

?fr cent, of attendance, 

Total nights^ absence. 

Number visits made bv committee. 



Whole number enrolled, 
Average number belonging. 
Average dail}' attendance. 
Per rent, of attendance, 



Boys. GlrU 


ToUl. 


68 17 


85 




60.5 




55.7 




90 




321 




1 


. SCHOOLS. 




Boys. Glrb. 


ToUl. 


1,062 1,248 


2,302 


• 


2,017 




1,855 




92 



HEMAKKS UPON THE STATISTICS. 

The enrollment of pupils in the schools shows a steady 
*»»d nipid increase. The whole enrollment in the day 
x^liools for the year 1891 was (>383, an increase of 580 
over the year 1890 ; the average number belonging, 5024, 
'^niiKiease of 415; the average daily attendance, 4521, 
an increase of 42 1 . The ratio of attendance to the av- 
^Jf'ige number l>elonging was 90 per cent., while the year 
'n^fore it was 89 per cent. ; this is a slight gain. 

ft is a most commendable fact, also, that with an aver- 
'^^^ number belonging of 415 more pupils than during the 
pi'Pceding year, there have occuiTed less actual cases of 
Ji^^^nce, fewer tardinesses, dismissals and truancy, as well 
H*^ 26 per cent, less cases of corporal punishment. These 
figures show improvement in the lines that I trust will 
'^'low still better returns in the future. 

The statistics under the heading *' Evening Schools'' re- 
^'<*al what an important factor they have become in a few 
y^ars in the educational agencies of the city. With an en- 
'^llmeut of 2042, and an average number belonging of 908, 
It has required live principals and foity-six assistants to 



8 SCHOOL REPORT. 

conduct them. They are no slight increase to the expense 
and care of the school department. 

The statistics for the private and parochial schools are 
ftirnished, as usual, by the courtesy of those in charge of 
those institutions. Although in some of these schools the 
statistics are not kept with the same accuracy as they are 
in the public schools, the summaries show, without doubt, 
a close approximation to the actual facts. 

COST OP INSTRUCTION PER SCHOLAR, BY SCHOOLS. 

In this connection, the cost of instruction per scholar is 
baaed upon the average number belonging to each school 
during the year, and the amount expended for hire of 
teachers, fuel, care of school-houses, books and supplies 
(except those furnished from the income of the Sylvia Ann 
Rowland fund), the term '* care of school-houses " includ- 
ing only the salaries of janitors. 

Elsewhere in the report is given the cost, by depart- 
ments, of each pupil, based on the average number of 
pupils belonging, and the total amount expended for the 
maintenance of each department during the year. This 
last computation will be the basis upon which tuition of 
non-residents will be collected. 

Table 1. This table is computed, as in former re- 
ports, on the items classified above. 

The cost of intiintenance of eai'h soholar in the High school 
for the year lia» heen $.70.23 

Grammar s^chools : 

Fifth street, $24.87 

Middle street. 2.5.3.=> 

Parker street, 2L10 

Thompson street, 20.44 

Harrington 'JVaining school. 2L90 



SCHOOL KEFORT. 



9 



Primary schools : 

Acushnet avenue, 
1. W. BenjamiD, 
Odar street. 
Cedar Grove street. 
Cannon ville, 
Dartmouth street, 
Fourth street. 
Linden street, 
Merrimac street, 
Maxtield street, 
William sti*eet, 

Country schools : 

» 

Acushnet. 
Clark-s Point, 
Xorth, 
F^lainville, 
l^ockdaie. 

Mill schools : 

>a^orth Mill, 
South Mill, 

Evening schools : 

^ >dar Grove street, 
^ifth street, 
Merrimac street, 
barker street, 
"-Thompson street, 
Evening Drawing, 

ITie average cost of a 
Ivrammar school pupil was 
Primary school pupil was 

tVmntry school pupil was 

Mill school pupil was 

Kvening Elementary school pupil was 

Evening Drawing school pupil was 



815.10 
20.55 
16.06 
16.03 
20.55 
15.56 
16.96 
16.64 
22.45 
19.31 
20.40 



928.52 
24.10 
22.69 
31.56 
24.70 



$29.62 
29.02 



$7.{S2 
5.16 

10.S9 

12.63 
6.01 

16.22 



82:^00 
18.15 
26.57 
29. :m 
7.18 
16.22 



10 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Table 2. The average cost per pupil, by departments, 
based on the avemgc number belonging and total expendi- 
tures for each department, was as follows : 

Hi^h school, 952.43 

Gratumnr schools, 23.44 

PHmary schools, • 19.41 

Country schools, 29.71 

Mill schools, 32.36 

Evening Elementary schools, 7.1S 

Evening Drawing schools, 16.22 

Average cost of a day school pupil, 823.85 

Average cost of an evening school pupil, including drawing 
school, 7.39 

EXPENDITURES. 

KECEIPTS. 

Annual and special appropriations : 

For teachers' salaries, $87,000.00 

Incidentals (including books and supplies) 33,000.00 
" (furnishing I. W. Benjamin 

school), 3,000.00 

Repairs of buildings, annual appropriation, 4,500.00 
'' '* special appropriations, 4,900.00 

Harrington school, $500.00 

Maxrteld Street school, 1,075.00 

High school, 1,625.00 

North school, 1,200.00 

Deficiency, 500.00 $132,400.00 

PAYMENTS. 

For tcachi^rs' salaries, 886,142.76 

Incidentals (inchnling books and supplies), 31,687.60 
*' (furnishing I. W. Benjamin 

school), 3,000.00 

Repairs of buildings, 6,978.93 127,809.29 



Balancie. $4,590.71 

(Of this unexpended balance. $2400 is for contemplated work yet 
uncompleted, as follows: 

High school, new boiler. 81,200.00 

North school, addition, 1,200.00 $2,400.00 



dOHOOL REPORt. 11 

DOG FUND. 
Salance, Jan. 1, 1891, 92,639.24 

^Received, Feb., 1891, 1,291.91 $3,931.15 

"Expenditures, 579.78 



Balance, $3,351.37 

Received from non-resident pupils, $952.44 

'' '' sale of sundry articles, 9.00 

'• '' " books and supplies, 36.70 $998.14 

The above receipts, $998.14, have been paid over to the 
City Treasurer and placed to account of Unappropriated 
Funds. 

The total amount expended for the day schools for the 
year 1891 exceeded that for 1890 by $5,898.25, as follows : 

Pay of teachers (increase), $3,565.86 

Incidentals " 4,102.46 $7,668.32 

Repairs of buildinj^s (decrease), 1,770.07 

Net increase, $5,898.25 

It is but fair to state that the item " pay of teachers " 
would have shown a much larger increase had it not been 
that the fiscal year for that item (and this occurs once in 
six years) was one week shorter than the usual fiscal year. 
The usual number of weeks for which teachers are paid is 
forty ; for 1891 it was thirty-nine, and for 1892 it will be 
forty-one. This is due to the fact that the fiscal year and 
the school year are not identical. As I stated above, had 
it not been that the fiscal school year was one week shorter 
than usual for item " pay of teachers," a larger increase of 
expenditure would have been shown than is indicated. 
This would have been due to two causes : the one, the ad- 
vance in salaries that has been made in maximum pay of 
lK)th primary and grammar teachers ; the other, the in- 
crease in the immber of regular teachers employed, neces- 
sitated by the growth of the schools. Of the increase in 
the " incidental account," $4,102.46, $3000 was appropri- 



12 SCHOOL REPORT. 

ated for equipping the I. W. Benjamin school with furni- 
ture and ai)paratus. 

On comparing the cost per pupil for the day schools in 
1800 and 1891, taking as the basis of compariscm the 
whole expenditures for the year and the average numl>er 
of pupils belonging, I find that the cost per pupil for 1891 
was $0.88 less per pupil than for 1890. Adding the pay 
of day teachers for the first week in 1892, which was 
$2,156.38, to the total expenditures for 1891, that the 
basis of comparison as to the number of weeks for 1890 
and 1891 may be the same, I find that the cost per pupil 
for IX\)[ was 43 cents per pupil less than for 1890. This 
result has l)een accomplished chiefly by watching carefully 
the condition of each room as to numbers, and by judi- 
cious transfers of pupils from crowded schools to less 
crowded ones, as well as by consolidating schools when 
possible, thus keeping the number of pupils to each teacher 
well balanced throughout the city. 

The increase in the pay of teachers has added about 
$4500 per annum to the pay-roll of the department, with 
the existing corps of teachers. The full effect of that 
increase was not felt the past year. It will be felt fully 
in the expense of the ensuing year. These salaries now 
compare favorably with those paid teachers in other cities 
of the Commonwealth of the comparative wealth of New 
Bedford. It is wise economy for a city to pay good 
salaries to its teachers, provided these salaries are made 
the means of commanding as good talent as is available. 
Treasurers of coiporations are usually paid salaries in 
proportion to the amount of responsibility that devolves 
upon them, and their ability to produce good dividends. 
Teachers have grave responsibilities resting upon them. 
The dividends which they are called upon to produce are 
citizens of character, possessed of minds equipped for 
the duties of life. There is slight reason to suppose that 



HCHOOL KEPORT. 9 

Primary schools : 

AcuHhnet ttvt-iiue, SIMO 

I. W. BeQjntniD. 30.U 

Cedar street. Ift.W 

Cedar Grovp street. 10.08 

Canaonville, 20.55 

DHrtinuutli sireft, IS.fiB 

Fourth street, 10.96 

Linden street, KM 

UerrLmRC street, ■iiM 

Maxrield Rtreet, 1B-31 

Wllllaiu street, 30.40 

Country schools: 

Acushnet. SiH.liS 

(lark's Point, il-10 

North. 32.69 

Plainvllle, HI S« 

BockdMic, ■U.-a 

Hill schools ; 

North Mill, 829.«a 

South Mill, *0-M 

Evening schools r 

(Vdar Grove street, J7.»i 

Fltth street, ■1l« 

Mcrrtnific street. 10-88 

Parker street. 13.(» 

Thoinppoii street. 8-01 

Evening Drawing. W.ii 

The average cost of a 

Uranimar school pupil wiis W'l.OO 

I'rimsry school pupil was IS.Io 

Countrv school pupil wiis 2C.S7 

Mill school pupil nas 2».:i0 

Kvcnltig Elfmeniary school pupil was 7.1fi 

Kveninjj; Drawing scliool pupil was I'l.Si 



14 SCHOOL REPORt. 

Plainvllle school, 28.14 

Rockdale " 3.18 

North Mill •' 7.75 

South Mill *' 20.31 

Evening Drawing ** 7.75 

Farm *' 5.98 

Office, 1.80 

Care of musical instruments, 401.25 

Express and freight, 47.26 

Pedagogical library, 8.97 

Lectures, 26.75 

Sewing materials, 5.68 

Covering books, . 175.75 

Stock on hand, Jan., 1892, 181.72 



93,228.24 



DETAILED STATEMENT. 

Outlay by the School Committee from the income of the 
Sylvia Ann Howland fund, from Jan. 1, 1891, to Jan. 1, 
1892. 

BOORS AND PERIODICALS. 

American Book Company, $132.39 

Appleton, D. & Co., 38.67 

Berlitz & Co., 4.00 

Boston School Supply Co., 78.53 

Educator, The, 8.20 

Educational Publishing Co., 3G.75 

Ginn & Company, 64.84 

Goldthwaitcs\ The, 2.00 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., 240.83 

Heath, D. C. & Co., 150.59 

Houghton, Mittiin & Co., 44.54 

Kellogg, E. L. & Co., 3.60 

Knowlton, 1). H. *fe Co.. 2.80 

Lothrop, 1). & Co., 10.87 

Leach, Shewell & Sanborn, 45.75 

Leo & Shepard, 153.13 

Mason, Perry <fe ('o., 66.06 

Small, Wiliard, 33.50 

Teachfrs* Publishing Co., 1.44 

University Publishing ( 'o., 24.74 

Ware, William & Co., .80 $1,150.03 



SCHOOL REPORT. 15 

PEDAGOGICAL LIBRAHT. 

Heath. I). C. & Co., $8.44 

Hatch, W. E., .53 8.97 

LECTURES. 

Hatch, W. E. (paid Miw Small for Swedish gy mastics), 26.75 

DRAWING DEPARTMENT. 



Anderson, W. H., Jr, 


'» 


860.00 




Caproni, P. P., 




7.75 




Hayes. X. P., 


SEWING DEPARTMENT. 


8.75 


71.50 


BliM & Nye, 




82.50 




Haskell & Tripp, 


MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 


3^.18 


5.68 


Ditson. Oliver, 




80.25 




Ginn & Company, 




296.70 




IJng, J. Henry, 




3.05 




Peirce, George, 




401 .25 




Peirce, George, 




51.00 




Silver, Burdett & Co, 


'1 


326.12 


1,087.37 


BINDING, COVERING BOOKS, AND COVERING-PA PER. 




Oaramons, FiOttie M., 




812.00 




Hathaway, Lottie, 




19.55 




Kane, D.J. & Bro.. 




52.32 




Lawton, I^uise, 




20 00 




derrick, Emma J., 




22.05 




Potter, Frances, 




10.15 




Potter, Hattie L., 




24.00 




Perry, George S., 




8 1. .50 




leaver Printing and 


Manufacturing Co., 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 


42..58 


284.15 


BiiM & Xye, 




82.68 




^ws. Edwin, 




2.00 




Heath, D. C. & Co., 




4.34 




Mercury Publishing i 


:^o.. 


(J.OO 




Pen-y, Georire S., 




92.54 


107.56 



CYCLOSTTE SUPPLIES. 

Kicbter, George H. ^ Co., 22.05 



16 SCHOOL REPORT. 



APPARATUS. 

Bliss & Nye, 8 .25 

£imer2& Amend, 21 .59 

Educational Supply Co., 42.70 

Ginn & Company, 44.70 

Hayes, N. P., 3.33 

Richards, George D., 11.05 

Sullings. Kingman & Co., 3.34 

Sherman, C. R. & Son, 3.10 

Southern Mass. Telephone Co., 1.50 131.66 

EXPRESS AND FREIGHT. 

Gomley, J. A., $6.50 

Gardner, T. M., 3.50 

Gray, C. A., 4.66 

Hatch & Co., 25.10 

Jennings, W. A., 14.00 

McFarlin, James, 9.00 62.76 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Adams, C. F., $2.50 

Boston School Supply C'o., 24.00 

Chase, E. B., 10.00 

Heath, D. C. & Co., 23.85 

Hayes, N. P., 1.00 

Kellogg, E. L. & Co., 2.35 

McAllister, T. H., 90.00 

Perry, George S., 4.75 

Richards, Greorge D., 5.62 

IMllinghast, W. A., 2.33 

Taber, R. VV., 1.00 167.40 



$3,125.78 
Cr. by money returned from School Herald Pub. Co., 11.75 



$3,114.03 



A smaller balance from this fund has been carried for- 
ward than for some years, at least, and I imagine it is the 
smallest since the foundation of the fund. The demands 
upon it increase each year from two causes : the tirst is 
that caused by the greater number of pupils in the schools ; 
the second is the general educational trend which demands 
constantly more objective teaching, therefore more appa- 
ratus, more reference books, that pupils may be encour- 



SOHOOL REPORT. 



13 



they will ever be paid salaries adequate to their responsi- 
bilities, and to their duties when efficiently performed. 



SYLVIA ANN ROWLAND EDUCATIONAL FUND. 



Balance of income on hand, Jan. 1, 1891, 
Interest for the year, 

Total credit, 
Expenditures for the year, 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1892, 

Cost of books and supplies during 1891 , 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1891, 



Cost of books and supplies charged to schools, 1891. 
Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. I, 1892, 



$394.39 
3,000.00 

•3,394.39 
3,114.03 

•280.36 

•3,114.03 
114.21 



•3,228.24 

•3,091.19 
137.05 

•3,2*28.24 



Disbursements to the several schools, and otherwise, 
are as follows : 



(I 



a 



High school, 

Fifth Street Grammar school. 

Middle Street ** " 

Parker .Street " ** 

Thompson Street ** 

Harrington Training 

Acushnet Avenue Primary school, 

1. W. Benjamin 

Cedar Street 

Cedar Grove Street 

Cannon ville 

Dartmouth Street 

Fourth Street 

Linden Street 

Merrimac Street 

Maxfleld Street 

Thompson Street 

William Street 

Acushnet 

Clark's Point 

North 



(I 

it 



•670.47 

223.88 

367.06 

329.82 

137.78 

173.66 

22.89 

181.52 

15.93 

49.92 

3.54 

33.13 

44.48 

20.80 

32.37 

16.22 

22.72 

9.09 

36.30 

12.51 

1.86 



18 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The cost of books and supplies furnished the several 
schools in detail, for the year 1891, is as follows : 









Books. 


Supplies. 


Total. 


High school, 






$340.93 


$627.87 


$968.80 


Fifth Street Gram mar school 


* 


261 .29 


293.06 


554.35 


Middle Street ** 


k* 




293.96 


207.40 


501.36 


Parker Street '* 


»« 




127.78 


202.08 


329.86 


Thompson St. ** 


fc» 




135.80 


123.93 


259.73 


Harrington Training " 




53.95 


106.62 


160.57 


Acushnct Avenue P 


rimary school. 


4.50 


47.98 


52.48 


I. W. Benjamin 


ki 


i. 


69.34 


88.19 


147.53 


Cedar Street 


fcC 


.t 


14.13 


48.96 


63.09 


Cedar Grove Street 


kC 


.4 


34.73 


50.22 


84.95 


Cannonville 


(. 


« k 


.54 


16.72 


17.26 


Dartmouth Street 


i% 


11 


11.99 


65.90 


77.89 


Fourth Street 


»k 


k4 


10.08 


38.77 


48.85 


Grove 


a 


4k 




7.68 


7.68 


Linden Street 


fc( 


kk 


15.93 


26.69 


42.62 


Merrimae Street 


k( 


kk 


4.38 


28.96 


33.34 


Maxfleld Street 


(( 


ki 


3.42 


32.02 


35.44 


Thompson Street 


(,i 


4k 


1.08 


10.47 


11.55 


William Street 


kk 


k4 


6.21 


26.39 


32.»MJ 


North Mill 




44 


25.40 


15.85 


41.25 


South Mill 




tk 


14.44 


12.70 


27.14 


Acushnet 




n 


34.30 


34.31 


68.67 


Clark's Point 




.4 


5.75 


11.44 


17.19 


North 




k* 


20.31 


23.82 


44.13 


Plain ville 




kt 


11.98 


16.12 


28.10 


Rockdale 




t4 


7.59 


23.20 


30.79 


Gedar Grove Street 


Evening 


kk 


18.98 


14.36 


33.34 


Fiftli Street 


kfc 


kk 




13.32 


13.32 


Merrimae Street 


.1 


ki 




6.30 


6.30 


I'arker Street 


k . 


k • 


5.00 


9.22 


14.22 


'ITio.npson Street 


kk 


4t 


10.95 


23.70 


34.65 


Evening Drawing 




kk 




100.91 


100.91 


Farm 




k k 


1.66 


5.73 


7.39 


Superintendent of S 


chools office. 


1.80 


7.88 


0.68 




,538.26 


$2,368.77 


$3,907.0:^ 



SCHOOL REPORT. 19 

The average cost per pupil in the different departments 
of t:he schools, for books and supplies, has been as fol- 
io virs: 

High school, $2.74 

Grammar schools, 1.07 

Primary schools, .29 

Country schools, .95 

Mill schools, .61 

Average for day schools, .73 

'* Evening Elementary schools, .11 

^^ Evening Drawing school, 1.83 

There was expended for the year, for books and sup- 

pli«8, $288.33 less than was expended in 1890, notwith- 

sts^nding the fact that there were belonging to the schools 

4X J5 more pupils in the day schools than in 1890, while 

tU^ evening schools have had as large an attendance. This 

do^8 not show that less care was exercised in the expendi- 

ti:ax^8in 1890 than in 1891. The necessary renewals of 

bd^oks in 1890 were larger than in 1891. There were 

*^^xiie extraordinary expenditures in the former year, for 

di^^wing instruments and other items, that did not occur 

1*^ the latter. A watchful care is exercised over all dis- 

^^irsements from the superintendent's office, and the teach- 

^^^*sare fully alive to the responsibility that rests upon 

^*^«m in preserving all school property. It is true that 

^^« income derived from the Sylvia Ann Rowland fund 

^^ds in keeping at a minimum the expenditures for books 

^^d supplies from the regular appropriations, while the 

^^hools in no wise suffer. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

There are now twenty-two school-houses in use by this 
department. One-half of them are brick, the other half 
»te wood. Nearly all of the large buildings are brick. 
Within the last two or three years the most objectionable 



20 SCHOOL REPORT. 

buildings have either been replaced by new ones or remod- 
eled. Early in the year the I. W. Benjamin school-house 
on Division street, a building with ten rooms and a hall ca- 
pable of being converted into two more rooms, has been 
completed. The finished rooms are nil occupied, and a 
large class seated in the hall. Undoubtedly within a short 
time the hall will be converted into two rooms and filled 
with pupils. Upon the completion of this building the 
Grove school-house, an old, disreputable building, was 
abandoned, and has been moved away. 

The Kempton Street school-house, which had not been 
used for school purposes for two years, has been torn 
down prepanitory to building upon the lot a nchool-house 
of sufficient size to accommodate the primary pupils in 
that section, and at the same time provide suitable rooms 
for the extension of manual training in the schools. The 
High Street building has also been abandoned, and is to 
be used for other purposes. The Truant school having 
been abandoned, the building formerly occupied by it, 
situated on the city farm, is no longer in use for school 
purposes. 

Although the table at the beginning of this Report shows 
six rooms situated in different sections of the city that are 
not occupied for school purposes, I think that all of them 
will be occupied within six months. 

Without question the school accommodations in the 
north part of the city will not suffice much longer for the 
needs of the schools. A new mill is projected for that 
section, which will add largely to the population. There 
is barely room now in the present buildings for the pupils 
who attend the schools. A site for a future building 
should be purchased while desirable lots are available. 
The time is not far .distant when a new building will be 
necessary also in the northwest part of the city, and this 
fact should be considered. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 17 

aged in the line of original investigation, — in short, man- 
ifold things which a few years ago were unknown quanti- 
ties in any schoolroom. Fixed charges upon the fund 
have grown up also during the years which the fund has 
been in existence, such as the care of the musical instru- 
ments, the covering and rebinding of books purchased by 
the fund, and the like ; so there is really less available for 
new matter than there was some years back. 

It appears from the amounts disbursed to the different 
schools during the year that certain schools are much more 
favored than others. I think this does not hold true, 
however, if instead of making comparisons from the 
amounts disbursed in any one year, the disbursements of 
several years are considered. The average amounts vary, 
of course, with the size of the schools and the grade of 
the pupils. The High school, the grammar schools, and 
the primary schools, requiring expenditures whose amounts 
vary directly in the order named. 

This fund is the envy of teachers in other cities, and the 
pride of our own. By it the schools are provided, with- 
out unduly increasing the amount expended for books and 
supplies, many things that make the tasks of the teachers 
easier, and help to broaden the instruction. Each suc- 
ceeding generation of teachers and pupils will have occa- 
sion to bless the generosity and wisdom of Sylvia Ann 
Howland, 

TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

STATEMENT. 

Cost of books and supplies purchased during 1S91, 94J 24.50 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1891, 1,226.0.5 $5,350.64 

Cost of books and supplies char;i:ed to schools in 

1891, ^3,907.03 

<7o8t of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1892, 1,481. SO 

Cash receipts from sale of books and supplies, 11.72 9o,:^0.64 



22 SCHOOL REPORT. 



In School Committee, 

January 4, 1892. 

On motion of Mr. Milliken : 

Voted unanimously. That the thanks of this Board be 
tendered to his Honor the Mayor, for the able, courteous, 
and impartial manner in which he has presided over the 
deliberations of the Board, and it is the earnest hope of 
the Board that notwithstanding his many and exacting 
duties, we shall have the pleasure of his frequent attend- 
ance during the coming school year. 

On motion of Mr. Tompkins : 

Voted unanijnously, That the thanks of this Board are 
due and are hereby tendered William H. Pitman, the 
Vice-Chairman of this Board, for the faithful manner in 
which he has discharged the duties of that office, and par- 
ticularly for his courteous treatment of the members. 

On motion of Mr. Sayer : 

Voted unanimously y That the thanks of this Board be 
extended to the Superintendent and Secretary for his 
faithful and zealous performance of duty, and his uniform 
courtesy in his relations with the Committee. 



8CHOOL REPORT. 23 

xYEW BEDFORD fflGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

EXERCISES, JUNE 26, 1891. 

1- F*RATER. Rev. E. S. Rousmaniere. 

Music, 

2. Ohorus. " Hark! Apollo strikes the Lyre." (Bishop,) School. 

3. Salutatory Address. Lottie B. Chase. 

4. Essay. '^ Woman's Work.*' Grace H. Carr. 

Music. 

•'>. Chorus. " Night's Shade no Longer." {Bossini,) Si'hool. 

6. Oration. "■ The Days of 70." Ro])ert S. Phillips. 

Music. 

7. iSONG. *'• Biondella.'' (Suchet Champion.) Grace W. Russell. 

8. Bourne Prize Essay. 

" A Comparison of Nydia and Maggie l\illiver." 

Bessie C. Read. 
Music. 

». Part Song. " Wiegenlied." {Frank.) School. 

10. Presentation of Diplomas, by his Honor Mayor Ashley. 

Music. 
U. Parting Song. Class of '91. 

12. Valedictory Address. William A. Wing. 

PARTING HYMN. 
Words by Bessie C. Read. Music by Beethoven. 

To-day we stand upon the shore. 
And view the distant *• far sea line "; 

Our bark is built and ready now 
To bear us o'er the foamhig brine. 

Chorus — ^To-morrow, we our trusty bark 

Will launch upon Life's troubled sea. 
To all the past a long farewell, 
We'll welcome that which is to be. 

We'll hope that great deeds, nobly done. 
Will mark the course of each career; 

That all will follow Dutv's call, 
None yield to base, ignoble fear. 

And when we've crossed the ocean deep. 

And safely gained the farther shore, 
May we with joy our anchor cast 

In waters calm forever more. 



24 



SCHOOL BEFORT. 



GRADUATES. 



Carpe Diem. 



Charles Posey Andress, 
Richard Henry Bennett, 
Ralph Gordon Davis, 
Thomas Seals Fletcher, 
Richmond LeRqy Glfford, 
Francis layman Oilman, 
Clarence Henry James, 
George Nelson Mason, 
Edward Lawrence McGurk, 
Charles Warren Milliken, 
Harry Gerrlsh Mosher, 
Robert Simmons Phillips, 
William Clifton Phillips, 
Lester Forrest Potter, 
Ernest Hamilton Sparrell, 
Louis Wilton Tilden, 
Benjamin Arthur Twiss, 
Charles Swan Washburn, 
William Arthur Wing, 
Lois Davis Blake, 
Caroline Elizabeth Bonney, 
Angela Florence Bowie, 
Agnes Estelle Braley, 
Carrie Bell Brownell, 
Annie Ix)uise Burbank, 

Florence Taber 



Grace Holmes Carr, 
Charlotte Bunker Chase, 
Mabel Edson Clifford, 
Edith Helen Cobb, 
Alice Louise Comey, 
Nellie Bradford Crapo, 
Edith Delano Dexter, 
Emma Louise Gartland, 
Sarah Wilbur Hart, 
Alice Cornell Howland, 
Eva Channing Jenney, 
Evelyn Clark Kelley, 
Alice Maud Kirby, 
Edna Chauey Lawton, 
Anna Christina Miller, 
Kate Moore, 

Florence Hay ward Norton, 
Flora May Peirce, 
Elizabeth Carrington Read, 
Grace Worthing Russell, 
Mariana Choate Silvester, 
Gertrude Pliny Smith, 
Marion Hannah Swasey, 
Mary Thomas Taber, 
Henrietta Webster, 
Weeden. 



RECIPIENTS OF CERTIFICATES. 



Elizabeth Sawyer Peirce, 



Mabel Otis Reynolds. 



GRADUATE AS OF CLASS OF '89. 



Grace Eaton Thompson. 



^HOOL RRPORT. 21 

The minor repairs upon the school buildings, such as 
painting, shingling, laying of new floors, plumbing, and 
the like, call for a considerable expenditure each year. 
For the past few years the amount regularly appropriated 
for repairs of buildings has not been adequate, and future 
appropriations must be increased somewhat to keep the 
buildings in good condition. 

I wish to renew here my recommendation made last 
year, that the school yards be made more suitable for 
play-grounds by dressing them with powdered stone or 
some ingredient that will make them firm and dry. I am 
satisfied that their present condition, especially in the pri- 
mary schools, is a source of sickness. 

For the various committees. 

WM. E. HATCH, 

Secretary. 



26 SCHOOL BKPOBT. 



RULES GOVERNING TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

Maximum. Minimum. 

Principal of Ilij^h school, $-i,760 

Sub-master of -^ 1,(J00 

Teacher of sciences, " 1,500 

Lady assistants, ** 900 $650 

Teacher of drawin^^, '• 650 

Militiiry instructor, •^ 300 

Principals of Grammar schools. 1,900 

Assistants '' '* 600 425 

Principals of Primary schools, 600 

Assistants *• ** 550 875 

Principal of Training school, 1,300 

Principars assistant. Training school, 800 

Senior in •* *^ 4 per week. 

Junior in " '* 3 *' 
Ungraded schools, $450 to 700 

Principal of Evening Elementary schools. 3 ptfr evening. 

Assistant " '' ** 1.37i " 
Supervivsor of drawing In Grammar and Primary 

schools, 1 ,200 

Supervisor of musir, 1 ,700 

Teacher of sewing. 5.50 

Assistants at rate of 491 

The salary of a Primary scliool principal of a four-room 
building is $(>00 per year, which is increased at the rate of 
$25 for each additional room. The salaries of assistiint 
teachers in the (Tramniar and Primary grades are increased 
at the rate of $25 per year until the maximum salary is 
reached. The salaries of assistants in the High school are 
increased at the rate of $50 per year until the maximum 
is reached. 



8CHOOL REPORT. 23 

NEW BEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

EXERCISES, JUNE 26, 1891. 

1. Prater. Rev. E. S. Rousmaniere. 

Music. 

2. Chorus. *' Hark I Apollo strikes the Lyre." (Bishop,) School. 

3. Salutatory Addrkss. lA>ttie B. Chase. 

4. Essay. '^ Woman-s Work/* Grace H. Carr. 

Mtunc. 

5. Chorus. " Night's Shade no Longer." {Bossini.) Siihool. 

6. Oration. " The Days of 7().** Robert S. Phillips. 

Music. 

7. Song. '* Blondella.'' (Suchet Champion.) Grace W. Russell. 

8. Bourne Prize Essay. 

" A Comparison of Nydia and Maggie Tulllver." 

Bessie C. Read. 
Music. 

9. Part Song. '' Wlegenlied." (Frank.) School. 

10. Presentation of Diplomas, by his Honor Mayor Ashley. 

Music. 

11. Parting Song. Class of '91. 

12. Valedictory Address. William A. Wing. 

PARTING HYMN. 
Words by Bessie C. Read. Music by Beethoven. 

To-day we stand upon the shore. 
And view the distant '' far sea line ''; 

Our bark is built and ready now 
To bear us o'er the foaming brine. 

Chorus — To-morrow, we our trusty bark 

Will launch upon Life's troubled sea. 
To all the past a long farewell, 
We'll welcome that which is to be. 

We'll hope that great deeds, nobly done. 
Will mark the course of each career ; 

That all will follow Duty's call. 
None yield to base, ignoble fear. 

And when we've crossed the ocean deep. 
And safely gained the farther shore, 

May we with joy our anchor cast 
In waters calm forevermore. 



SOHOOI. BBPOKT. 



■ajamo 
pun 8iuajiij 



•guasqv [ 

"■^"0 )1"H I 

') usance [nn J 

JO BSHTIf) -Qfj 



1^ 









M-fasyM§3Soice^^Srta&«rf ■— sii=2 



o^^^^^S* 









SCHOOL REPORT. 29 

CALENDAR, 1892. 

Winter term begins Jan. 4, 1892 ; ends April 8, 1892. 
Summer term begins April 18, 1892 ; ends July 1, 1892. 
Fall t^nn begins Sept. 8, 1892; ends Dec. 23, 1892. 

VACATIONS. 

April 9, 1892, to April 17, 1892, inclusive. 
July 2, 1892, to Sept. 5, 1892, inclusive. 
Dec. 24, 1892, to Jan. 8, 1893, inclusive. 

HOLIDAYS. 

Every Saturday ; Washington's Birthday, or the day 
following when that occurs on Sunday ; Fast Day ; Memo- 
rial Day ; Labor Day ; from Wednesday noon before 
Thanksgiving the remainder of the week. 

SCHOOL SESSIONS. 

From March 1 to November 1, 9 a. m. to 11.30 A. m., 
and 2 p. m. to 4 p. m., in the Grammar schools; 9 a. m. 
^o 12 M., and 2 p. m. to 4 p. m., in the Primary schools. 

From November 1 to March 1, the afternoon sessions 
^i^e from 1.30 o'clock to 3.30 o'clock, in the Grammar and 
Primary schools. 

High school, 8.30 a. m. to 1.30 p. m., during the whole 
year. 

The signal 22 (that is, two strokes, an interval, and the 
two strokes repeated) sounded on the fire alarm at 8.15 
i. M. will indicate no school in the Primary and Grammar 
grades and the Acushnet school in the forenoon. The 
«»ine siornal sounded at 12.45 p. m. will indicate no school 
in the Primary and Grammar grades and the Acushnet 
school in the afternoon. If the signal is sounded at 8.15 
A.M. and not repeated at 12.45 p. m., there will be a school 
session in the afternoon. This regulation does not apply 
to the High school or to the Country schools except the 
Acushnet school. 



30 SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL BOARD, 1891. 

CHARLES S. ASHLEY, Mayor, Chairman, exroffido. 

WILLIAM H. PITMAN, Vlce-Chaimian. 

WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 

JOSEPH DAWSON, President of Common Council, es^^fficio. 



Ward 1— Elizabeth W. Stanton, Anna R. Borden, .lohn H. Ix>we. 

Ward 2 — Frank A. Mllliken, Thomas Mack, Isaac B. Tompkins, Jr. 

p^^arrf 3— William H. Pitman, Stephen H. Shepherd, Helen W. Web- 
ster. 

Ward 4 — Seth W. Godfrey,- George H. Dunbar, George H. Batchelor. 

Ward 5— William L. Sayer, Fred. A. Bradford, Jona. Howland, Jr. 

Ward 6 — Francis M. I^ennedy, Thomas Donaghy, Jr., Betsey B. 
Winslow. 



STANDING COMMIITEES. 

William E. Hatch, Secretary. 

On High School — Dunbar, Howland, Benjamin, Miss Winslow, .Mrs. 
Webster, Mrs. Borden, Mrs. Stanton, Pitman, Tompkins. 

On Grammar Schools — Tompkins, Pitman, Howland, Mrs. Webster, 
Bradford, Mrs. Borden, I^we, Sayer, Milliken. 

On Primary *Sc^oo/«— Benjamin, Pitman, Tompkins, Dunbar, Miss 
Winslow, Mrs. Stanton, Kennedy, Batchelor. 

On Country Schools — Lowe, Donaghy, Mack, Batchelor, Mrs. Stan- 
ton, Godfrey. 

On Training School — Pitman, Mrs Stanton, Kennedy, Mrs. Borden, 
Batchelor, Milliken, Sayer. 

0^1 Fai^m School — Donaghy, Keimedy, Bradford, Godfrey, Saver, 
Milliken. 

On Mill Schools — Mrs. Borden, Howland, Lowe, Donaghy, Mrs. 
Webster, Bradford, Godfrey. 

On Evening Schools— Kennedy^ Lowe, Mack, Donaghy, Batchelor, 
Godfrey, Milliken. 

On ol/w^ic— Bradford, IMtnian, Batchelor, Sayer, Milliken, Godfrey. 

OwZ>r(/?rin^— Mrs. Webster, Miss Winslow, Donaghy, Dunbar, Mack, 
Godfrey, Sayer. 

On Sexcing — Miss Winslow, Mrs. Webster, Mrs. Borden, Mrs. Stanton. 

On Examination of Teachers— Dwwhwv ^ Tompkins, Lowe, Donaghy, 
KenniHly. Mrs. Webster, Benjamin, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Brad- 
ford, Mrs. Stanton. 

On T-orl-Iiottks — l^itnian, Kennedy, Mack. Batchelor, Milliken, Sayer. 

On Expenditures — Howland, Benjamin. Tompkins. Pitman, Bradford, 
Mack, Lowe, Donaghy. Dawson. 

On Howland Fund — Howland, Benjamin, Tompkins, Dunbar, Pitman, 
Bradford, Kennedy, Dawson. 

On Fay-lioUs — Tompkins, Howland, Mack. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



31 



SCHOOL BOARD, 1892. 

CHARLES S. ASHT^Y, Mayor, Chairman, exrofflcio, 
WILLIAM H. PITMAN, Vice-Ohalrman. 



WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 

Office, 13S wmiam street, 
ce HouTfi. 8| to 9 A. M., 12| to I P. M. SaturdayB, to 9^ A. M. 



WILLIAM G. KIRSCHBAUM, Pres. of Common Council, exrofflcio, 
Ytegalar meetings of the Board, first Monday of each month, at 7.80 p. m. 



Ward One, 

yatne. Place of Business. 

Jobin H. Lowe, 925 Acushnet avenue. 

Eiixabeth W. Stanton, 
Aaiia H. Borden, 

Ward Two. 

Isaac- B.Tompkins, Jr., 78 Union street, 
Pttink A. Milliken, 43 William street, 
Thomas Mack, 20 Bedford street, 

Ward Three. 

^niiam R. Channing, 192 Union street, 
^'Uliam H. Pitman, Five Cents Sav. Bank, 
Stephen H. Shepherd, Standard Office, 

Ward Four. 

^niiain E. Brownell, 271 Union street, 
Seth W. Godfrey, 
George H. Dunbar, 

Joua. Rowland, Jr., 
^Uliam L. Saver, 
Fred. A. Bradford, 



Ward Five. 

Mercury Office, 
20 Bedford street, 

Ward Six. 



Betsey B. Winslow, 

Francis M. Kennedy, Eddy Building, 

Thomas Donaghy, Jr., 64 Union street. 



Besiflence. 
981 Acushnet avenue. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
Ashland, cor. Austin st. 

G91 County street. 
290 Pleasant street. 
248 Cedar street. 

91 Mill street. 

(50 Chestnut street. 

24 Sycamore street. 

271 Union street. 
17 Bethel street. 
179 William street. 

54 Russell street. 

70 South Sixth street. 

342 Union street, 

315 County street. 
139 Acushnet avenue. 
103 Acushnet avenue. 



EMMA M. ALMY, Superintendent's Clerk. 



HENRY SMITH, Truant Officer. 
Oflee HonrB. 124 to 1 p. M. ; Saturdays, 9 to 9| a. m. Residence, 372 Cottage st. 

GEORGE K. DAMMON, Assistant Truant Officer. 



32 SCHOOL REPORT. 

STANDING COMMirrEES. 
William E. Hatch, Secretary. 

On Hi{/h School — Dunbar, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Mrs. Stanton, 
Pitman. Tompkins, Shepherd, Mack. 

On Grammar ^SrAoo/.^— Tompkins, Pitman, Howland, Bradford, Dun- 
bar, Mrs. Borden, Lowe, Saver, Miliiken. 

Oh Primary Schools — Shepherd, Pitman, Tompkins, Miss Winslow, 
Mrs. Stanton, Kennedy, Godfrey, Channin^, Mrs. Borden. 

On Country Sch^^ols-^JjOwe^ Donagliy, Mack, Mrs. Stanton, Brown- 
ell, Channing. 

On Traininff School — Pitman, Mrs. Stanton, Kennedy, Miliiken, 
Saver, Channing, Brownell. 

On rrwaw^—Donaghy, Kennedy, Bradford. Godfrey, Sayer, Milii- 
ken. 

On Mill SrhoolH — Mrs. Borden, Howland, I^owe, Donaghy, Bradford, 
Godfrey. Brownell. 

On Eveninfj Schools — Kennedy, Lowe, Mack, Donaghy. Godfrey, 
Miliiken, Channing. 

On 3/M«tc— Bradford. Sayer. Miliiken, Godfrey, Shepherd, Brownell. 

On Manual Tminim/Sayew Miss Winslow. Donaghy, Dunbar, 
Mack, Godfrey, Kennedy, Mrs. Borden, Mrs. Stanton. 

On Ex/imination of Teachers — Dunbar, Kennedy, Miss Winslow, Mrs. 
Borden. Mrs. Stanton, Pitman. 

On Text'-BoftX's — Pitman, Kennedy, Mack, Miliiken. Sayer, Brownell. 

On Expemliturt's — Howland, Tompkins, Pitman, Bi-adford, Mack, 
Lowe. Donaghy, Shepherd, Kirschbaum. 

On Iloirland Fund — Howland, Tompkins, Dunbar, Pitman, Bradford, 
Kennedy, Shepherd, Kirschbaum. 

On linles—ViUimn^ Dunbar, Howland, Tompkins. 

On Pay-Holls — Tompkins, Howland, Mack. 



i . 



'- /. 







ISAAC W. BENJAMIN. 



Mr. Ilriijiitniii liiul sonal ii~ n niL'mlH'r of ilie Si'lioiil Dnnnl cniitiiui- 
oiislv fur twciltv-.irn.' venr*. anil at llu- limi- cn' his dentil hnii tun mure 
lears in ivhith lo sene Id complete thi' turm to which lie liiid Intfii last 
eli'Clrd. ilis iiTvU-eh wtrt ol' j,'real viiliit to tlic ^ihcmls, and «trc 
ajiprfciiitcii alike liv the tt!achl-^^^ ami hiK asiciiiulfs upon llii' Hoard. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



31 



SCHOOL BOARD, 1892. 

CHARLES S. ASHLEY, Mayor, Chairman, eaHffflcio. 
WILLIAM H. PITMAN, Vlee-Thairman. 



WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 

Office, 133 William street. 
Office Hours, 8i to 9 a. m., 12| to 1 p. m. Saturdays, 9 to 94 a. m. 



WILLIAM G. KIRSCHBAUM, Pres. of Common Council, ex-officio. 
Regular meetings of the Board, first Monday of each montli, at 7.30 p. m. 



Ward One. 

Name, Place of Businest*. 

John H. Lowe, 925 Acushnet avenue. 

Elizabeth W. Stanton, 
Anna li. Borden, 

Ward Two. 

Isaac B.Tompkins, Jr., 78 Union street, 
Frank A. Milliken, 43 William street, 
Thomas Mack, 20 Bedford street, 

Ward Three. 

William R. Channing, 192 Union street, 
William H. Pitman, Five Cents Sav. Bank, 
Stephen H. Shepherd, Standard Office, 

Ward Four. 

William E. Brownell, 271 Union street, 
Seth W. Godfrey, 
George H. Dunbar. 



Jona. Howland, Jr., 
William L. Saver, 
Fred. A. Bradford, 



Ward Five. 

Mercury Office, 
20 Bedford street, 

Ward Six. 



Betsey B. Winslow, 

Francis M. Kennedy, Eddy Building, 

lliomas Donaghy, Jr., 64 Union street. 



Residence. 
931 Acushnet avenue. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
Ashland, cor. Austin st. 

091 County street. 
290 Pleasant street. 
24H Cedar street. 

91 Mill street. 

60 C'hestnut street. 

24 Svcamore street. 



271 Union street. 
17 Bethel street. 
179 William street. 

o4 Russell street. 

76 South Sixth street. 

342 LTnion street. 

315 County street. 
139 Acushnet avenue. 
103 Acushnet avenue. 



EMMA M. ALMY, Superintendent's Clerk. 



HENRY SMITH, Truant Officer. 
Offloe Hours, 12i to 1 p. m. ; Saturdays, 9 to 9| a. M. Residence. 372 Cottage st. 



GEORGE K. DAMMON, Assistant Truant Officer. 



f 

/ 



I , 



/ 4t 






— .:, '^'^ 



Report of the Superintendent. 



^'^ the School Committee: 

Ladies and Gentlemen, — I have the honor to Huhiuit 
^ you my fourth annual Report, which is the thirty-tirst 
0^ the series of Annual Reports of the Superintendent of 
Schools of the city. 

By a vote of your Board this Report, together with that 
of the Secretary, is to constitute the Annual Repoit of the 
School Committee. 

I take occasion at the outset to thank you most sincerely 
for your continued confidence and aid. I wish to express 
^1=^0 my appreciation of the spirit manifested by the suc- 
^^•s.sive city governments toward the school department 
y which funds are willingly provided for carrying on the 
""•^g^ilar work successfully, and for building and equipping 
^^^' and commodious school-houses to meet the growing 
*u?ecl8 of the depaitment. And, more than all, I wish to 
'^'^i^nk our citizens at large for the generous support which 
they have always given the schools. This support has 
^'<>iie made it possible for a broad and liberal policy to be 
^'^^tituted and maintained in their administration. 

^^^KOLLMENT AND A^rTENDANCE OV PUPILS. 

The statistics of enrollment and attendance (see table; 

"^i' the year are gratifying in many respei^ts. The enroll- 

^^nt has increased by 5/iO pupils ; the average number 

•^longing by 415 ; the average daily attendance by 528. 

»^^e per cent, of attendance for the year in all the schools 

^*** 90, a gain of 1.1 per cent, over the preceding year. 



[ 



38 superintendent's report. 

This ratio of attendance is, however, no better than that 
secured in the average city, and falls below that of many. 

With the larger enrollment, there were less actual cases 
of tardiness and dismissal than in the previous year. The 
decrease in the former is possibly due to the great exer- 
tions of the teachers to secure prompt attendance ; and 
the latter to the change in the hours of afternoon sessions in 
the winter months, and the aboliticm of recesses in gram- 
piar schools, with the dismissal of schools at 11.30 o'clock 
in the forenoon instead of at 12 o'clock as formerly. 

While it is pleasant to note improvement in all these 
points, the fact cannot be disguised that the work of thfe 
schools is seriously affected by absences, tardinesses, and 
dismissals of pupils. Many parents do not appear to 
realize the effect of occasional absences even upon the 
progress of their children. A pupil cannot lose a half- 
day's work with his class without sufiering in a degree. 
If the absences are frequent and unnecessary, the pupil 
suft'ers not only from the loss of the subject matter that 
has been covered in his absence, but suffers most in that 
he is developing unconsciously within himself a habit of 
irresponsibility in the |)erformance of duty. It is need- 
less to state that absences on account of sickness, or foi 
good and sufficient reasons, are excusable. But a large 
percentage of the absences, tardinesses, and dismissals, 
cannot be accounted for under the heading ** absolutely 
necessary.'' I imagine that I am w^asting time, ink and 
paper, in dwelling upon this theme. But I cannot but 
feel that it is a very impoilant matter, and one upon 
which the sense of the community is not yet suflSciently 
awakened. 

1 this connection 1 wish to direct attention to the fact 
that although the enrollment in the public schools is now 
steadily increasing, (and has been since the large with- 
drawal incident to the establishment of the parochial 



Annual Report 



OP THR 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, 



FOR TME YEAR 1891. 



40 superintendent's report. 

class are constant law-breakers. This condition of affairs 
in the larger life is but a counterpart of school life. Tru- 
ant officers hold those pupils in check who compare to the 
second class by their manner of dealing with those who 
are similar to the third class. 

It is no more possible to stamp out truancy in the schools 
than it is possible to stamp out law-breaking in the com- 
munity at large. Schools cannot be made attractive 
enough to prevent truancy, nor can the l>est of teachers 
control it absolutelv. Good teachers (»an do much, how- 
ever, to check it. The cause of truancy usually lies back 
and outside of school. All cases of persistent truancy are 
reported to me by the truant officers, and we discuss the 
causes and advise together as to remedies and final dispo- 
sition. Experience goes to show me that the two primary 
causes of truancy are, first, lack of proper guidance and 
restraint of pupils out of school ; second (and this applies 
to a much smaller class), tendency to wrong-doing, caused 
either by an abnormal development, or an inheritance from 
a vicious ancestry. 

The truant class by no means includes all the bad or 
vicious children in the schools. In fact, althouorh thev are 
law-breakers, many of them are not bad when thev beffin 
truancy, but usually become so if they are allowed to con- 
tinue the practice for any length of time, A truant under 
the law is one who absents himself from school without 
permission of j)arent or teacher. Occasionally a dutiful 
pupil plays ** hookey" when there is some strong attinic- 
tion for him away from school, and he fears permission 
will not be granted him to enjoy it either by parent or 
teacher. I^ut su(;h cases are rarer in these days than of 
vore, and should be discriminated curefully bv teachers. 

Hut there exists another class of pupils who do not play 
tniant, but are unruly and vicious. The influence of these 
upon the schools is more pernicious, in some cases, than 



Report of the Superintendent. 



To the School Committee: 

Ladies and Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit 
to you my fourth annual Report, which is the thirty-tirst 
of the series of Annual Reports of the Superintendent of 
Schools of the city. 

By a vote of your Board this Report, together with that 
of the Secretary, is to constitute the Annual Re{)oit of the 
School Committee. 

1 take occasion at the outset to thank you most sincerely 
for your continued confidence and aid. I wish to express 
also my appreciation of the spirit manifested by the suc- 
cessive city governments toward the school depaitment 
hy which funds are willingly provided for carrying on the 
regular work successfully, and for building and eciui[)ping 
new and commodious school-houses to meet the growing 
needs of the depaitment. And, more than all, I wish to 
thank our citizens at large for the generous support which 
they have always given the schools. This support has 
alone made it possible for a broad and liberal policy to be 
instituted and maintained in their administration. 

ENROLLMENT AND Arrp:NDANCE {)V PUPILS. 

The statistics of enrollment and attendance (see table; 
for the year are gratifying in many respei^ts. The enroll- 
ment has increased by 5H0 pu|)ils ; the average number 
belonging by 41.5 : the average daily attendance by 528. 
The per cent, of attendance for the year in all the schools 
was 90, a gain of LI per cent, over the preceding year. 



42 superintendent's report. 

School at Walpole by the counties of Norfolk, Bristol, 
and Plymouth, has enabled the city to abandon its truant 
school. This it has done, and the truants who were con- 
lined there were transferred to the Union school, and 
others convicted since that time have been sent there. 
There are confined in that school at present from this city 
ten truants. I have visited the school and am satisfied 
that it is a well conducted institution, wherein the well- 
being of the boys will be promoted. 

I append the yearly reports of the Truant OflScer and 
the Assistant Tiiiant Oflicer. The former gives his whole 
time to the service of the day schools ; the latter gives his 
especial attention to the evening school delinquents, and 
to the inspection of factories and mercantile establishments 
where child-labor is employed ; he also serves as messen- 
ger and janitor at the School Committee rooms. lioth 
are kept busy with the various duties of their positions. 
These duties are specified in their reports. 

TRUANT OFFICER'S REPORT. 

School!* vis»it(Hl, 1,272 

Absenct's reported by teachers, 430 

Absences without permission of parents, 111 

Second offences, 42 

Tliird offences, 21 

Parents notified, 569 

Arrests, 14 

Prosecutions, 13 

On pn>b}iti(m, 2 

Sentcnt-cd to Truant scliool, 11 

Tardincss<*s investi<j^ated, 20 

Talicn to sdiool from street, 26 

Visits to mills. 62 

Violation** of labor law, 1q 



superintendent's report. 39 

schools), a large percentage of the children in the city are 
no longer enrolled in the public schools. About one 
fourth of the pupils enrolled in the schools of the city are 
to be found in private and parochial schools. About one 
seventh are in the former, and six sevenths in the latter. 
Some of the children, it is true, who attend the private 
schools, find their way later on into the grammar grades 
of the public schools, but the majority of this 25 per cent, 
of the school children of the city are withdrawn forever 
from the public schools. I am no alaiTnist, neither do I 
question in the least the absolute right which every parent 
has under the laws to educate his child wherever he chooses 
under those laws. But I wish to call attention to the fact 
that the issue is now strongly drawn between the public 
and other schools, and those who would see not only the 
integrity of the public schools preserved, but their future 
usefulness increased, must insist that their superiority be 
maintained against all competitors. 

TRUANTS AND INCORRIGIBLES. 

The truant oflScei*s perfonn their duties with vigilance 
and discretion. The effect of their work is shown in the 
returns. The teachers report less cases than when the 
schools had a much smaller enrollment. Cases of truancy 
are confined to a comparatively few pupils, so long as 
those which do occur are vigorously checked. The moral 
effect of capable truant oflScers in checking the tendency 
to truancy is as valuable, if not more so, than their actual 
work. This surveillance of pupils who are disposed to be 
unruly is as necessary to the welfare of an extended sys- 
tem of schools, as is that of a suflScient police force for the 
preservation of peace and order in large cities. The ma- 
jority of citizens in our cities are law-abiding, even under 
trying circumstances ; others seem to live upon the border 
line between right-doing and wrong-doing ; a still smaller 



44 superintendent's REPOHf. 

the state. There are many cases, without question, whe 
suffering is entailed because children cannot go to wor 
not having complied with the rigorous laws. Sometim 
it is widowed or deserted mothers with children to su 
port, who desire the help of a girl or hoy thirteen or fou 
teen years of age to assist in providing bread and shelt 
for the family. Sometimes the father who in health ear 
barely enough to provide the necessities of life for hii 
self and family gets sick or is injured, and needs temp 
rary help from his children that they may not suffer, 
that he may not be compelled to seek the aid of charit 
Again, it is the child himself, orphaned, with no one 
support him, who could support himself had he but t 
certificate ; without it^ he tecomes a charge to the town 

I am not drawing upon fiction while I write of the 
matters. A number of persons come before me for cer 
ficates every year with cases similar to those cited. Soi 
of the children for whom certificates are sought can rea 
write, and cipher, but not being of the proper age canu 
have certificates. I do not intend to enter in a discussi< 
here of the justice or the wisdom of the compulsory ed 
cational laws that are on our statute books. I have n 
the space or time for it. I am attempting to show th 
this subject is growing to such an importance, and c 
mands so much of my time, as well as that of my cler 
that it should be better understood. I cannot but fe( 
however, that there must be a limitation to the right whi 
a state has to deprive needy parents of the assistance 
their children, that the public at large may be benefite 
without the state itself recompensing the parents for t 
service of such children. I observe that a bill has alreii* 
been introduced into the present legislature raising t 
school age to fifteen or sixteen years old. 

In addition to the certificates that are required of 
persons under sixteen years of age before they can be ei 



superintendent's report. 41 

that of truants. Ordinary punishments do not reach 
them. They do not seem amenable to the influence of 
either the school authorities or to that of the parents. 
What to do with them has always been a source of trouble 
to those who are responsible for them. The state author- 
ities, recognizing that something should be done to reach 
such pupils, and realizing that expelling them from school 
would result badly for them and the community, amended 
the truant law that pupils of this class should come under 
its provisions. The section as amended reads as follows : 
**Each town shall make all needful provisions and ar- 
rangements concerning habitual truants and children be- 
tween seven and fifteen years of age, who may be found 
wandering about in the streets or public places therein, 
having no lawful occupation or business, not attending 
school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children as 
persistently violate the reasonable i^^ules and regulations of 
the common schools^ and shall make such by-laws as shall 
be most conducive to the welfare of such children and to 
the good order of such town : and shall provide suitable 
places for the confinement, discipline, and instruction of 
such children." 

The School Committee, after due consideration, has re- 
(juested the City Council to adopt an ordinance- by which 
the section quoted may become operative in this city. It 
is now before the Committee on Education. I hope that 
the measure will receive favorable consideration. Its ap- 
plication will be rare, but the very fact that it can be used 
will exercise a most wholesome restraint on the class for 
whom it is intended. 

I cannot close the article without expressing my grati- 
fication that the Ciiy Truant School no longer exists. It 
never was on a proper basis, and the School Committee 
for years sought to have it improved or other provision 
made for the truants. The founding of the Union Truant 




W. BENJAMIN SCHOOL. 



SttPERINTENDENT's REPORT. 45 

ployed, and which can only be issued from my office, all 
illiterate minors over fourteen who do not attend the day 
schools are compelled to attend the evening schools. So 
each of these certificates are obliged to be issued and kept 
on file at the mills or other places of employment. These 
certificates of employment are sent to the schools once 
each week for the signature of the principals, as the law 
requires an average attendance from each pupil of 70 per 
cent, at school that he may work. The names of the de- 
linquents are reported each week by the various principals 
to my office. It then becomes the duty of the assistant 
traant officer to look up these cases and warn them to 
attend. In case of failure to heed this warning the cases 
are reported to me ; the certificate is taken away, the de- 
linquent discharged, and the certificate withholden until 
the delinquent promises that the offence shall not be re- 
peated. 

There are other features of this business that take time 
and thought, upon which I will not enter. Enough has 
been said to show that this one branch of the school ma- 
chinery alone is becoming burdensome, and requires time 
that is needed for more purely educational matters. 

The full text of the laws relating to children and illit- 
erates has been given in previous Reports, and I will not 
repeat it here. I will close by expressing the hope that if 
the school age is raised to fifteen or sixteen years that 
^nie discretionary power will be granted school authori- 
ties in granting certificates, or that the State will make 
the necessary provision for recompensing indigent parents 
tor the services of those children who are forced into the 
^^y schools after they are thirteen years old. 



46 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORt. 

TEACHERS. 

The two most important considerations in any school 
system are the school buildings, together with their sur- 
roundings, and the teachers. President G. Stanley Hall, 
of Clark University, one of our most distinguished edu- 
cators, whose opinions are authority in educational circles, 
both in this country and abroad, is inclined to accord 
supreme importance to the first two because of their inti- 
mate connection with the physical and moral welfare of 
the children. For, as he has well said, " What shall a 
man give in exchange for his health ? " 

I do not intend to enter upon a discussion of the com- 
parative value of the two factors mentioned above in con- 
nection with school systems. Award what place one may 
to the first of these, I do not fear that any one will attempt 
to gainsay the statement that the character of any system 
of schools will depend upon the character of the teachers 
in those schools. How important it is, then, that the 
standard for admission to the teaching corps be a high one, 
and that all good citizens lend their influence to secure this 
desired end. It rests with the parents of the country to 
elevate and sustain the profession of teaching, and in no 
other way can they secure for their children a greater 
blessing. But this cannot be done by finding fault with 
individuals, neither by blind criticisms nor by the exer- 
cise of sentiment. The causes that produce poor teachers 
must be sought out and remedied. A study of what has 
been done in the older and powerful nations of the w^orld 
to make teaching a liberal profession, and thereby to at- 
tract into it a high order of talent, will indicate many of 
the reasons why in this rich and enlightened country the 
teaching corps cannot compare with those of countries of 
far less wealth and resources. 

It is a recognized fact that even in this state of Massa- 



I- 






^N 



ox 






I 



48 superintendent's report. 

grammar school education ; some have no talent for teach- 
ing, and this is discovered only when they have left the 
school. There should be some way to test them in this 
last particular more fully before they leave the school. If 
the standard of admission was higher, and the means of 
testing the ability of those who were to graduate were on 
a better plane, there would be less failures among them 
and less cause for the statement made by me in my Report 
of 1889. In common with most superintendents, I prefer 
for teachers normal graduates to those who are not, other 
qualifications being equal. But I am not absurd enough 
to value a normal graduate above every one else, simply 
because he or she happens to be a normal graduate. 

Those who are to teach should be prepared for the work 
by possessing good health. Too many who attempt the 
work are physically incapacitated at the start. It is not 
just to the children that such persons should be placed in 
charge of them. Again, those who are to teach should 
possess a disciplined and well-stored mind. And, more 
than all, they should be refined in manner and wholesome 
in character. Some one has well said that no one should 
teach whose manners were such as to prevent him from 
being acceptable in any refined home. There is nothing 
unreasonable in the demand that every teacher possess the 
above qualifications, and no one who would object to them 
ought to think for a moment of becoming a guide and 
educator of the young. 

The School Board of this city has taken a high position 
on this question of appointing teachers. Candidates for 
positions in the teaching corps must be gniduates of a 
high school or an academy. They must pass successfully 
an examination which covers quite a wide range of studies. 
They nuist then receive an acceptable professional training 
either in a training or normal school. Occasionally va- 
cancies occur, and there are no candidates on the approved 



superintendent's report. 49 

list to till them. In such cases the examination is waived 
under suspension of the Rules of the Board ; but then 
only teachers of tried and successful experience are ac- 
cepted as candidates. This, in the main, is the standard 
adopted by the committee some three years ago. The 
result is being felt already in the schools, and will add 
constantly to their strength. 

Six resignations and three deaths have occurred in the 
corps within a year. Fifteen appointments have been 
made. The excess of appointments over the resignations 
and deaths is due to the increase in the number of pupils. 

The present spirit of the corps is excellent. Many of 
the teachers are seeking constantly to strengthen and 
broaden their knowledge in various ways. They study 
educational literature, seeking the best methods of instruc- 
tion ; or they take special courses at the Swain Free 
School, that their intellectual appetites may be constantly 
whetted. A number have devoted a large pail of their 
summer vacations to the study of advanced methods of 
teaching as propounded by expert educators. All these 
signs of intellectual activity are most welcome, and should 
extend until every teacher is fully alive to the fact that 
mental growth is as necessary to intellectual life as phys- 
ical growth is to physical life. 

RESIGNATIONS. 

T-ena B. Chubbuck, Fifth Street Grammar school. 

Lucy D. Ashley, Middle Street Grammar school. 

Emma B. Allen, Parker Street Grammar school. 

Annie M. Carpenter, Darmouth Street Primary school. 

Sarah E. Tuell, 1. W. Benjamin Primary school. 

Snsan C. Grafikm, Rockdale school. 

TRANSFERS. 

Emma A. McAfee, from Parker Street to Fifth Street. 

Grace H. Potter, from Cedar Grove St. to Dartmouth St. 

Anna I. Dexter, from Parker Street to Acushnet Ave. 

Julia A. Fay, from Farm school to Clark's Point. 



50 



superintendent's report. 



. TEMPORARY ASSIGNMENTS. 



Mary P. Tilllngliast, 
Alice P. Terry, 



Clark's Point school. 
Rockdale school. 



APPOINTMENTS. 



Mary M. Robinson, 
Carrie E. Footman, 
Regina M. Paull, 
Elizabeth Bennett, 
Daisy M. Butts, 
Mary E. Paslio, 
Edith M. B. Taber, 
Grace Covell, 
Ra(;hel L. Den ham, 
Susan P. Diman, 
Mabel Bennett, 
Edith K. Weeden, 
Eleanor V. Tripp, 
Kate Sweet, 
Gertrude M. Robinson, 



Middle Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
ITiompson Street Grammar i«cho< 
Thompson Street Grammar scho( 
Maxfield Street Primary school. 
Dartmouth Street Primary schoo 
Dartmouth Street Primary schoo 
I. W. Benjamin Primary school. 
1. W. Benjamin Primary school. 
1. W. Benjamin Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary scho< 
Cedar Grove Street Prlmarj^ scho( 
North Mill school. 
South Mill school. 



Hn flDemorlam. 



Miss Sarah E. Field, 
Miss Abby F. Sullivan, 
Miss Josephine Almy, 



Died June 2, 1891. 
Died Oct. 29, 1891. 
Died Jan. 5, 1802. 



•'Faithful unto the end" may well be said of the.* 
teachers. All of them were successful in their professioi 
and exceptionally true in the discharge of their dutie 
Their womanly characters won for them the love of the 
pupils, the respect of their fellow-teachers, and the conl 
dence of the School Board. Resolutions were adopted h 
the School lioard testifying to their woith and to the 
acceptable service. 



6tJPERlNTENDENT*8 REPORt. 5l 

PRIMAEY SCHOOLS. 

The Primary grades have had an increase in the average 
number of pupils belonging for the year of 303. This 
increase has necessitated the employment of seven addi- 
tional teachers in this department. The average number 
of pupils belonging in these grades was 2826 ; the aver- 
age number of pupils to a regular teacher was 48. If the 
distribution of pupils was unifonn throughout the city 
this average number to a teacher would be a good propor- 
tion l)oth for purposes of instruction and for economic 
reasons. But unfortunately it has not always been possi- 
ble to prevent overcrowding by opening new rooms, or 
hy transfers. At the time of writing, however, there is 
greater uniformity in the number of pupils to a teacher in 
these grades than at any time within the past four years 
at least. 

The methods of instruction in primary schools have 
undergone a great change within the past decade. Those 
now generally in use are based on a more rational concep- 
tion of the child nature than were those of the past. Even 
those teachers who have given no thought to the processes 
0* niental development follow perforce in a perfunctory 
^'^y the general trend. If every primary teacher would 
^ke a study of the psychological laws upon which all 
g^od teaching must rest, and would apply them, she not 
^'^'y would make less mistakes, but her efforts would be 
^Warded by the quickened interest of her pupils. It is 
ot supreme importance that children in their earlier years 
"® guided by skillful hands. The universal testimony of 
those who have had experience in the matter is that chil- 
"''^n who have had the skilled kindergarten training prior 
^0 entering the primary grades of school possess essential 
advantages over those who have not had such training. 
•f'i« feeling that has so long prevailed, that skill is not re- 



52 superintendent's report. 

quired to teach primary grades successfully, is rapidly 
disappearing, and by it the schools are being immeasurably 
strengthened. 

I feel that on the whole these schools are in good con- 
dition. There are weak places in them, most assuredly. 
Supplying vacancies that occur among the teachers with 
graduates of our training school, rather than with untrained 
and untried teachers, as was done not many years since, 
is essentially beneficial. If these young ladies will con- 
tinue their studies in the light of added experience, their 
influence will be felt more and more as the years go on. 

It give me pleasure to record also that the methods of 
discipline are milder than formerly, while the prevailing 
order is fully as good. The number of cases of corporal 
punishment have been reduced fifty per cent, within two 
years. The difficulties of governing are increased from 
the fact that there are a good umny pupils in these grades 
who have not had the advantages of our schools at the age 
when they are most amenable to their influences. These 
pupils range from ten to fourteen years of age. Their 
proper place, so far as age is concerned, is in the grammar, 
schools. For the most part they are children of foreign 
birth, who have had no schooling whatt^ver prior to enter- 
ing our schools at an advanced age, or, having had such 
advantages in their own country, know but little English, 
if any. I am not sure but it would be a good plan to 
have a mixed grade in the large primary buildings for such 
pupils, where they should remain until they were fitted 
for the grammar schools. 

A modification in the course of studies has been made 
for these grades within the year. A preliminary course 
in geography has been added. The study is to be entirely 
objective ; the pupils are to use no text-books. For the 
first two years the work will be embraced under the lan- 
guage and observation work. During the next two years 



t^ 




PARKER STREET SCHOOL. 



8tTPERINTENDBNT*8 REPORT. 53 

it will also 1>e taught in connection with the language and 
oliservation lessons, taking a stronger trend 6ach year to- 
ward pure geography work. 

I feel, after careful consideration, that it would be well 
also if the course was further modified by doing away with 
all teaching of number, except incidentally, for the first 
half of the first school year. I think the time can be 
spent to better advantage by devoting it to language work 
and to such lessons as will develop the powers of obser- 
vation. I feel that the children would be as skilled in the 
oae of nambers at the end of the four years' primary as 
now, better developed in the use of language, and with 
leds friction in accomplishing it than at present. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The average number of pupils belonging in these schools 
the past year was 1535, an increase of 62. One teacher 
was added to the department. The average number of 
pupils belonging to a teacher throughout the city was 41.5. 
This is almost an ideal number, and if good work is not 
done it cannot well be attributed to the excess in the num- 
ber of pupils. 

There is not much to be said about these schools that is 
altogether new. There has been no marked chan«:e in the 
course of instruction. The teachers have managed to 
abate the corporal punishments, especially in two of the 
buildings, with no serious detriment to the pupils or to 
good order, that I can perceive. Some few, I suspect, 
still long to wield the birch more than they think public 
opinion would approve ; but I do not believe they would 
he any happier for so doing, or that their pupils would be 
any wiser or better. It is desirable to appeal to the no- 
bler instincts of the human race rather than to their baser 
oues, and I am loath to believe that there arc many pupils 



54 superintendent's REPORt. 

in our schools who cannot be reached by appealing to their 
love and honor rather than to their fear and shame. Par- 
ents can do much to make discipline easier by giving a 
strong moral support to sustaining the reasonable regula- 
tions. They do not always do this, but lend frequently 
willing ears to complaints made by their children, and 
criticise and blame the teachers without thoroughly under- 
standing the situation. There is one other matter to 
which I wish to direct attention in this connection, and 
that is the abuse made by the children of the privilege of 
leaving the rooms during school hours. That it is abused 
there is no question, and the constant ninning out by so 
many is a serious hindrance to good work. When it is 
necessary, there should be no denial, but the attitude 
taken by some in the matter has rendered the teachei's al- 
most powerless to regulate it. 

The instruction averages well with that of grammar 
schools in general. There is much that is good ; there is 
some that is indifferent. The two questions of the Jay re- 
lating to elementary schools in this country that are the 
chief subjects of discussion are, " Shall the Grammar 
School Course be Shortened?" and *'How Shall the 
Grammar School Course be Enriched?" Should I enter 
upon a discussion of those questions there w^ould not l>e 
space for anything else in this Kepoii;, nor would I then 
be able to cover the tield of controversy. My conviction 
now, however, is that it should not be shortened. If any 
way can he discovered by which the course can be enriched 
and made more productive, 1 am ready to welcome it. 
But we must proceed cautiously in uprooting the pro- 
cesses and traditions of generations, although the simple 
fact that they have endured for generations is not conclu- 
sive evidence that they are the best. 



superintendent's report. 55 

The New England Association of Colleges at a meeting 
last fall recommended the following changes in the gram- 
mar school curriculum : 

1. " The introduction of elementary natural history in 
the earlier years of the programme as a substantial sub- 
ject, to be taught by demonstration and exercises rather 
than from books." 

2. *'The introduction of elementary physics into the 
the later year^< of the programme as a substantial subject, 
to be taught by the experimental or laboratory method, and 
to include exact weighing and measuring by the pupils 
themselves." 

3. '* The introduction of elementary algebra at an age 
not later than 13 years." 

5. ** The offering of an opportunity to study French, 
German or Latin, or any two of these languages from and 
after the age of 10 years." 

This is all that is asked. When the above recommend- 
ations were made known, those persons who have been 
proclaiming all along that the grammar schools were al- 
ready undertaking too much must have been appalled. It 
i^ proposed to eliminate a certain amount of the arithmetic 
and geography to make room for these new studies. 

But eliminate what you will, if the recommendations 
should be adopted in its entirety it would involve the re- 
organization to a certain extent of the whole school sys- 
^^Da, As to the first section, the reply might well be 
*»ade that this has already been done in many places, and 
^iiy others are working towards this end. As to the 
'^^'ond section, it is feasible to teach a ceilain amount of 
physics in the grammar schools, and but few doubt the 
utility of it ; but when it conies to teaching it by the ex- 
perimental or laboratory plan, and to include exact weigh- 
^'^Sand measuring by the pupils themselves, the experi- 
ence of teachers in our high schools give little encourage- 



56 superintendent's report. 

ment, even if there were time, teachers, and laboratories 
for the same. As for the studies proposed in the other 
sections, serious and perplexing questions arise at once as 
to their claims for a place in the grammar school course 
for the average pupil, beyond what is already done in 
geometry. 

These are the questions to be settled in the future, if 
they are ever settled. All parties, however, appear to be 
united on one point and that is the necessity of improve- 
ment in the quality of teaching. Teachers must know 
more before they can teacjh much better. There is a 
movement all along the line to demand teachers who are 
better educated and better trained for their work ; and 
going with this is the extension of trained supervision. 1 
am glad to be able to say that the standard is as high in 
New Bedford as anywhere and the teachers equal to the 
best. A more careful and systematic supervision of the 
grammar teachers by the principals for the purpose of 
guiding and helping them is a means by which the efficien- 
cy of these schools could be increased. Every grade un- 
der the supervision of the masters should feel their in- 
fluence as much as the highest one, but this is not the 
case. A preponderance of their time and thought is be- 
stowed upon the out-going class rather than being evenly 
distributed throughout the grades. This reflection is not 
intended as a stricture upon our own schools alone ; it is 
a general tendency that I believe to be wrong in principle. 



/ .. 



r., . 



' • / 



'/ 



i 




ACUSHNET SCHOOL. 



superintendent's report. 57 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

Country Schools. — The appellation Country Schools 
is applied to five schools of the city. There were former- 
ly six ; but the Cannouville school has been transferred to 
the primary department for it is essentially a graded pri- 
mary school. The Acushnet school is now so well graded 
and the line of work expected of it so similar to the gram- 
mar and primary grades that 1 am of the opinion that it 
would be well to classify that school with the graded de- 
partments. If that was done, there would remain but 
four schools which should be classified as Ungraded Coun- 
try Schools, viz. : Clark's Point, North, Rockdale, and 
Plainville schools. These four last-mentioned schools are 
of the conventional rural school type, and present all the 
difficulties of administration common to the type. The 
Dumber of pupils in them range from 20 to 40 of all ages 
and grades from the lowest primary to that next to the 
High schools. The teacher of one of these schools must then 
be skilled in both primary and grammar work, if the school 
is to prosper. She must possess more than ordinary execu- 
tive ability, and the capacity for turning oil* work rapidly. 
Teachers possessing these qualifications cannot be induced 
to take these schools and undergo all the other inconven- 
iences that must be undergone in residing in a rural dis- 
trict unless the reumneration is sufiicient to niakeit an ob- 
ject for them. I therefore recommend that the maximum 
salary of these four schools be j)laced at $700 j)er annum, 
to be paid, however, only to the teachers whose excel- 
lency makes them worth the extra salary, and when no as- 
si.«!itant is employ e<l to relieve the regular teacher. 

Two of these schools were without regularly appointed 
teachers for a large part of the vcar, and of course suf- 
fered thereby. I refer to the Kockdale school and the 
Clark's Point school. Both teachers resiirncd on account 



58 superintendent's report. 

of ill health ; one after being absent from duty nearly if 
not quite a year. In the Fall Miss Julia A. Fay, who 
had beem teaching the Truant school, after the abolition of 
that school, was transferred to Clark's Point. The Com- 
mittee have decided also to place an experienced and suc- 
cessful teacher in the Rockdale school as soon as one can 
}>e found. The North school has been overcrowded for a 
great part of the year. A temporary assistant was tried 
in tile school, but could not work to advantage. An ap- 
propriation has been granted with which to enlarge the 
l)uilding, but as yet nothing has been done. The animus 
of these schools is generally to be commended, and if 
thorough teachers can be kept in them, they can be lifted 
to a high degree of efficiency. 

Mill Schools. — Two additional teachers have been 
placed in these schools, one in the North Mill school, the 
other in the South Mill school. Each school has been divi- 
ded into a grammar and primary section. The average 
membership was 112 for the year or an average of 28 pupils 
to a teacher. This is a small number certainly, but the 
character of the schools warrant an excess of teaching force 
rnther than too little. With the teachers now employed 
an additional number of 40 pupils can be accommodated, 

so that there will be no call for any further addition to 
the teaching force of these schools for years to come. 

The prevailing order in these schools is good, and the 
teaching for the most [)art commendal)le. As the pupils 
go from here to work and not to higher grades of school 
the results of the teaching is subjected to less adverse 
criticism than in any other of the schools. I am confi- 
dent, however, that the teachers do not allow that fact to 
abate their zeal or their sense of the moral responsibilities 
attached to their work. 



superintendent's report. 59 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Elementary Schools. — ^The total enrollment of pupils 
in these schools for the year was 2043, a gain of 45. The 
average membership was 903, the average nightly attend- 
ance 678 6r 75 per cent, of the average membership. 
The Statutes require an average attendance from illiterates 
of 70 per cent. ; so it is safe to say that the requirements 
were more than met in this respect. 

The teaching corps consisted of five principals and for- 
ty-three assistants. The number of pupils to a teacher 
avei'aged 20.5. As the distance seemed too great for 
those residing in the extreme south and south-west parts 
of the city to go to the Fifth St. school, three rooms were 
opened this year in the Thompson Street school for even- 
ing school purposes. Mr. Joseph Kennedy was trans- 
ferred from the Merrimac Street school to the new school. 
The fact that the average membership in the Thompson 
Street school was 138, while th^e Fifth Street school 
s^howed a loss of only 36, indicates that there was a de- 
mand for the new school for other reasons than that qf lo- 
oation. 

The cost of maintaining these schools was $6465.90, an 
iiverage of $7.18 per pupil. This is a decrease in the 
^ross cost of $2904.18. But the schools were in session 
but 58 nights instead of 78 as last year. That is, they 
^ere in session three nights a week for twenty weeks, less 
trWo holiday nights, instead of four nights a week. The 
Cyommittee made the change partly to reduce expenses, 
and partly because it felt that three nights' work each 
week was sufficient for pupils and teachers. I think the 
change has proven a wise one, and I trust it will be con- 
tinued in the future. 

The teaching service has been good, nearly all the teach- 
ers l)eing tried and successful ones. The priiunpals were 



60 superintekdent*8 report. 

the same as last year with one addition » Miss Mary A. 
Kane, who was placed in charge of the Merrimac Street 
school, when Mr. Kennedy was transfeiTed to the Thomp- 
son Street school. 

The principals report successful work done. There is 
not so large a contingent of advanced pupils as is desir- 
able. The illiterates form the great bulk of the schools, 
although the schools are graded so that the advanced pu- 
pils may be in separate rooms. Comparatively few of the 
advanced pupils who enter at the beginning have the per- 
severance to continue. Many discharge cards have been 
given to pupils who entered as illiterates either this year 
or last. These discharge cards certify to their having 
answered (he conditions of the law, and few who secure 
these releases remain to pursue their studies farther. This 
is by reason of their want of ambition, however, rather 
than any acquired distaste for the schools. 

Evening Drawing School. — This school varies but 
little in attendance from year to year. The enrollment 
for 1891 was 85 and the average membership 61, as com- 
pared with an enroUment of 84 and an average member- 
ship of (U for 1890. 

The expense of maintaining the school for the 40 nights 
. was $892.30 or $lt). 22 per pupil. This year there were 
no unusual expenses. Last year the expense was $23.97 
per pupil, owing to the purchase of a number of drawing 
instruments. But at the less cost per pupil this school is 
pro rata the most expensive department of the school sys- 
tem. If there were more pupils in each section the aver- 
age cost would be materially lessened, and more could be 
accommodated in each without any addition to the teach- 
ing force. Yet the variety of subjects taught do not ad- 
mit of any fewer teachers. 

The Course of Study adopted last year has been contin- 



StrPERlKTENDENT^S REPORT. (51 

ued. The work is in the main commendable. At the 
close of the term in the spring an exhibit of the winter's 
work was given in the rooms. It was visited by many 
interested persons and in certain lines the exhibit was 
good, considering the amount of consecutive work that 
has l>een done under the present corps of teachers. It is 
proposed to hold another at the close of the coming Spring 
term, when undoubtedly still better work will be shown. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The average number of pupils belonging for the year 
Was 353, a gain of 21. The average daily attendance was 
338, a gain of 23. The average number of pupils to a 
teacher, not including the special teachers, was 29+. 
Notwithstanding the strenuous etlbits of the teachers to 
is^ecure good attendance the showing of the school in this 
x^espect does not compare favorably with many of the best 
liigh schools. A percent, of attendance in a New Eng- 
land high school of 92+ is nothing of which to boast. It 
i^isually runs from 95 to 98 per cent. Teachers deplore 
"that pupils are allowed while attending school to engage 
in occupations and amusements that entail not only their 
absence but sap their strength, and divert their attention 
from their work to a degree which is often most harmful 
in its effects upon individuals, if not upon the school at 
large. The remedy lies with the parents upon whom is 
the obligation to impress upon their children a realizing 
sense of their duty to the school, which for the time be- 
ing is their post of service. 

Comparatively little friction has arisen by reason of the 
methods of government employed during the year. Ju- 
diciousness has marked the individual cases of discipline 
thut have occurred. 
There are no changes to note in the course of study. 



1 



62 superintendent's report. 

The character of the teaching as a rule is of a high order. 
In certain directions it is cipable of improvement, both 
specific and general. Among other things there is a ten- 
dency in certain lines of the work to excessive detail and 
drill in technicalities which is wearisome to pupils, the 
source of irritation to parents, and it is questionable 
whether it is productive of good. The few complaints 
that have come to my attention in the year have been with- 
in these lines. Teachers frequently wonder at the narrow 
mental vision of pupils. Is it not true that to outside 
observers this fault is not confined to pupils only? The 
microscopi.st performs a most useful pait in the investiga- 
tion of truth, but the world at large has not the time to 
engage in so close analysis. It accepts his geneniliza- 
tions, and acts upon them. I apprehend that it would be 
wise if, in teaching, this fact served as a guide. 

Not a large proportion of the graduates of the school go 
to college. It is not apparent why there are not more. 
Those who have gone within the year confirm the eflScien- 
cy of the teaching they have had in preparation by their 
standing and honorable mention. The only one who en- 
tered Harvard received an *' honor" in mathematics. The 
three entering Brown University reached the first grade 
in all subjects, with one exception in one study, when the 
students were examined after entrance for division into 
four grades ; and one took the first prize ($20) for excel- 
lence in j)rcparation in French. Of the two young ladies 
entering Wellesley one was especially successful in Latin 
c()nii)Ositi()n, while the English essay of the other was 
pronouncc^d by the Professor of lihetoric the best of those 
presented bv the Freshmen at their first call. Two vounsT 
ladies also who entered Dana Hall school have been hiHi- 
ly commended for their training in English. These facts 
are significant as they j)()int to excellence in instruction in 
^V*veral lines rather than one. Hut it also must be borne 



superintendent's report. 



63 



i ri mind that those who go to college get the cream of the 
instruction in every high school, and it is not always safe 
tro judge of the instruction as a whole by the results ob- 
trained in such cases, although I know that the standard of 
liigh schools in the past has been fixed largely on these 
I'esults. 

I desire before closing to express my belief that the me- 
chanical details of the work of the teachers can be profit- 
ably lessened by modifying the system of marking for 
standing and promotions in the school. And what is still 
more impodant, I think the pupils would be benefitted 
thereby. But of this I intend to speak more fully under 
the head of Examinations and Promotions. 

I append in figures several items that relate to the 
school which are of interest : 



Girls. Boys. Total. 
Number who entered the High school, Sept., 1891. 

from the New Bedford public schools, 78 

Number who entered during the year 1891 from 

other schools, 11 



Grand Totals. 



89 



44 122 



4 
48 



15 
137 



Number graduates of the year who are pursuing 
iijgher courses; 

College, 

Swain School, 

Harrington Training School. 

Post-graduate studies in the High school, 

Grand Totals, 



1 


2 


3 


7 


7 


14 


8 




8 


12 


") 


17 


28 


14 


42 



Number of post-graduates connected with the school 
»i 1891 : 

Jan. to June, 1891. 
Sept. to Dec, 1891, 



1(> 
12 



4 



20 
17 



Grand Totals, 



28 



9 



3 



4 



62 superintendent's report. 

The character of the teaching as a rule is of a high order. 
In certain directions it is cipable of improvement, both 
specific and general. Among other tilings there is a ten- 
dency in certain lines of the work to excessive detail and 
drill in technicalities which is wearisome to pupils, the 
source of irritation to parents, and it is questionable 
whether it is productive of good. The few complaints 
that have come to my attention in the year have been with- 
in these lines. Teachers frequently wonder at the narrow 
mental vision of pupils. Is it not true that to outside 
observers this fault is not confined to pupils only? The 
microscopiftt performs a most useful part in the investiga- 
tion of truth, but the world at large has not the time to 
engage in so close analysis. It accepts his generaliza- 
tions, and acts upon them. I apprehend that it would be 
wise if, in teaching, this fact served as a guide. 

Not a large proportion of the graduates of the school go 
to college. It is not apparent why there arc not more. 
Those who have gone within the year confirm the eflScien- 
cy of the teaching they have had in preparation by their 
stunding and honorable mention. The only one who en- 
tered Harvard received an ** honor" in mathematics. The 
three entering Brown University reached the first grade 
in all subjects, with one exception in one study, when the 
students were examined after entrance for division into 
four grades ; and one took the first prize ($20) for excel- 
lence in preparation in French. Of the two young ladies 
entering AA^ellesley one was especially successful in Latin 
composition, while the English essay of the other was 
pronounced by the Professor of Khetoric the best of those 
presented by the Freshmen at their first call. Two young 
ladies also who entered Dana Hall school have been hiffh- 
ly commended for their training in English. These facts 
arc significant as they point to excellence in instruction in 
several lines rather than one. Hut it also must be borne 




8UPERIKTENDENT*8 REPORT. f>l 

ued. The work is in the main commendable. At the 
close of the term in the spring an exhibit of the winter's 
work was given in the rooms. It was visited by many 
interested persons and in certain lines the exhibit was 
good, considering the amount of consecutive work that 
has l)een done under the present corps of teachers. It is 
proposed to hold another at the close of the coming Spring 
term, when undoubtedly still better work will be shown. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The average number of pupils belonging for the year 
was 353, a gain of 21. The average daily attendance was 
338, a gain of 23. The average number of pupils to a 
teacher, not including the special teachers, was 29+. 
Notwithstanding the strenuous efforts of the teachers to 
secure good attendance the showing of the school in this 
respect does not compare favorably with many of the best 
high schools. A percent, of attendance in a New Eng- 
land high school of 92+ is nothing of which to boast. It 
usually runs from 95 to 98 per cent. Teachers deplore 
that pupils are allowed while attending school to engage 
in occupations and amusements that entail not only their 
absence but sap their strength, and divert their attention 
from their work to a degree which is often most harmful 
in its eflfect^ upon individuals, if not upon the school at 
large. The remedy lies with the parents upon whom is 
the obligation to impress upon their children a realizing 
sense of their duty to the school, which for the time be- 
ing is their post of service. 

Comparatively little friction has arisen by reason of the 
methods of government employed during the year. Ju- 
diciousness has marked the individual cases of discipline 
that have occurred. 

There are no changes to note in the course of study. 



62 superintendent's report. 

The character of the teaching as a rule is of a high order. 
In certain directions it is cipahle of improvement, both 
specific and general. Among other things there is a ten- 
dency in certain lines of the work to excessive detail and 
drill in technicalities which is wearisome to pupils, the 
source of irritation to parents, and it is questionable 
whether it is [)roductive of good. The few complaints 
that have come to my attention in the year have been with- 
in these lines. Teachers frequently wonder at the narrow 
mental vision of pupils. Is it not true that to outside 
observers this fault is not confined to pupils only? The 
microscopi.^st performs a most useful pait in the investiga- 
tion of truth, but the world at large has not the time to 
engage in so close analysis. It accepts his geneniliza- 
tions, and acts upon them. I apprehend that it would be 
wise if, in teaching, this fact served as a guide. 

Not a large proportion of the gi-aduates of the school go 
to college. It is not apparent why there are not more. 
Those who have gone within the year confirm the efiScien- 
cy of the teaching they have had in preparation by their 
standing and honora})le mention. The only one who en- 
tered Harvard received an *' honor" in mathematics. The 
three entering Brown University reached the first gmde 
in all subjects, with one exception in one study, when the 
students were examined after entrance for division into 
four grades ; and one took the first prize ($20) for excel- 
lence in preparation in French. Of the two young ladies 
entering Wellesley one was especially successful in Latin 
composition, while the English essay of the other was 
pronounced by the Professor of Hhetoric the best of those 
present(;d by the Freshmen at their first call. Two young 
ladies also who entered Dana Hall school have been hiirh- 
ly commended for their training in English. These facts 
are significant as they point to excellence in instruction in 
>vveral lines rather than one. But it also must be borne 



superintendent's report. 



63 



in mind that those who otq to college oret the cream of the 
instruction in every high school, and it is not always safe 
to judge of the instruction as a whole by the results ob- 
tained in such cases, although I know that the standard of 
high schools in the past has been tixed largely on these 
results. 

I desire before closing to express my belief that the me- 
chanical details of the work of the teachers can be profit- 
ably lessened by modifying the system of marking for 
standing and promotions in the school. And what is still 
more important, I think the pupils would be benefitted 
thereby. But of this I intend to speak more fully under 
the head of Examinations and Promotions. 

I append in figures several items that relate to the 
school which are of interest : 



Girls. Boys. Total. 
Number who entered the High scliool, Sept., 1891, 

from the New Bedford public schools, 78 44 122 

Number who entered during the year 181)1 from 

other schools, 11 4 15 



Grand Totals. 



89 48 137 



Number graduates of the year who are pursuing 
higher courses; 

College, 

Swain School. 

Harrington Training School. 

Post-graduate studies in the High school, 

Grand Totals, 



1 


2 


3 




7 


14 


8 




8 


12 


O 


17 


28 


14 


42 



Number of post-graduates connected with the school 
in 1891 : 

Jan. to June, 1891, 
Sept. to Dec, 1891, 

Grand Totals, 



u 


4 


20 


12 





17 


28 


9 


37 



64 superintendent's report. 



Number pupils taking classical course, Dec, 1891 : 



Class IV., 20 
'' III., 5 
'' II., 1 

" I., 

Post-graduates, 2 

Grand Totals, 28 


17 
8 
2 
2 

29 


3] 
5? 


Number pupils preparing for Medical School : 






Class I., 
Post-graduates, 


1 
2 




Grand Totals, 


S 




Number pupils preparing for Institute of Technology : 






(^lass I., 
Class II., 


1 
5 




Grand Totals, 


6 





Total immber pupils preparing for higher schools 
not including Swain School or Harrington Train- 
ing school, C 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS, 

This school began operations two years ago last Sep 
tember. Four classes have graduated from it numberinj 
twenty-six in all. A class of two will graduate in Febru 
ary next. A change in the regulations governing thi 
school was made during the year by which the number o 
pupil teachers who may be connected with the school a 
any one time has been raised from twenty-four to twenty 
seven. The limit in number of each entering class here 
after has been fixed also at nine. This last provision wa 
made that the classes may be well balanced in the future 
For it was found that the class applying for admissior 
each September was much smaller than that applying ii 
February. For instance, the number of candidates apply 
ing in September, 1890, was four, and but two gainei 




HARRINGTON MEMORIAL SCHOOL. 



superintbndent'r report. 65 

admission ; while the number applying in the following 
Febmary was fifteen, fourteen of which passed the exam- 
ination and were admitted. 

Such a disparity in the numbers in the different classes 
worked badly in operating the school, as the senior class 
upon whose members rests the charge of the different class 
rooms, might not be large enough to supply the different 
rooms with an experienced teacher, and at the same time 
the lower classes might be very large. Where such an 
emergency has arisen, some of the graduates have been 
assigned temporarily to the school that no class should be 
in charge of an inexperienced teacher. ^This last term 
owing to the scarcity of teachers by reason' of sickness in 
the regular corps and the increased attendance in the 
schools, this school suffered somewhat in comlmon with 
several others in the city in its teaching force. Such a 
contingency is not likely to occur again very soon, if at all. 

The complement of pupil teachers in the school is now 
full, twenty-scA'en in all, divided as follows : Senior 
Class, thirteen : Junior Class, five ; Sub-Junior Class, 
nine. These young ladies are all graduates of a high 
i»chool or its equivalent, and have passed successfully a 
rigid examination prior to their admission to the school. 
It is readily seen that the standard of admission is such as 
to exclude all who have not already acquired the founda- 
tion of a substantial education. 

The school is doing much good in preparing teachers for 
the schools of the city. The principals of the different 
schools wherein the graduates have been assigned testify 
to the value of the preparation they have received. I find 
also that the testimony of the various principals of the city 
regarding the substitutes sent out from the school (and 
there are not a few during the year) is that they know 
what to do when they take a class, whereby there is nnich 
saving to the schools compared with the former methods 



t>6 superintendent's report. 

of supplying the temporary vacancies. That there should 
be individual diiferences is to be expected, but I have yet 
to know of an instance of a complete failure of either a 
graduate of the school, or of one sent out to substitute. 

There seeenis to prevail among a few persons the feel- 
ing that this foru) of school is an innovation and an exper- 
iment, in fact something of a pet scheme of mine, which I 
am hound to defend. Lot me assure all such persons that 
they do both me and the school an injustice. Schools of 
this class have been maintained ff)r years in a number of 
cities in this commonwealth as well as in other cities of 
New England, and they are growing in favor every day. 
But upon this phase of the subject I do not ju'opose to 
dwell. The school was founded through an earnest con- 
viction on my part and that of the Board that it was a 
feasible and practical method of increasing the efficiency of 
the teaching, even if not an ideal way, audi, at least, have 
had no occasion whatever for changing my mind. 

There is another question that arises in connection with 
the school, and one that I approach with a realizing sense 
of its importance : it is the welfare of the pupils who at- 
tend it. 1 have heard the fear expressed that the pu))ils 
would suffer through the inexperience of the teachei's and 
the frecjuent changes in the same necessitated by the plan 
upon which the school is founded. I have taken pains 
therefore to watch carefully the \yorkings of the schools. 
My ex[)erience with this school, as well as with similar 
n ell-conducted schools elsewhere, contirm me in the belief 
that such fears are groundless. To begin with no inexpe- 
rienced teacher is to have charge of a class room, if the 
plan of the school is carried out as re(|uired by the regu- 
lations governing it. The teacher must have served in the 
school a year as a student, an observer, and an assistant 
before she is placed in charge of a room. Again, by 
means of the assistants, })upils get more individual atteii- 



superintendent's report. 67 

tion and assistance than in the ordinary school. And still 
further, a skilled principal and assistant principal are pro- 
vided, who watch and guide most critically the methods 
of discipline and instruction throughout the whole school. 
One has but to visit the school frequently to become con- 
vinced of its excellent tone. He needs only to compare the 
mental attitude and condition of the pupils with that of 
other pupils in the city of similar grades if he wishes to be 
assured of the comparative worth of the instruction. I do 
not contend that there are no faults in the school, that mis- 
takes are not made. What school is free from faults, and 
in what school are mistakes not made ? I would go many 
a mile to see a perfect school, and would sit the humblest 
of disciples at the feet of the teacher. All that in justice 
can be expected of the school is, that the welfare of the 
pupils shall be as well promoted as in the avemge school 
of the city. That this is done, I am confident, and those 
members of the School Board who have observed the 
working of this school and compared it with that of similar 
grade throughout the city assure me that their convictions 
are the same. 

Miss Stuart, the principal, found it necessary to apply 
for leave of absence toward the close of the fall term on 
account of ill health. She expects to be absent two or 
three months. I cannot commend too hi*i:hlv her worth 
to the school and her work since she has been with us. I 
trust that rest and change of climate may soon restore her 
strength and enable her to resume her duties. During 
her absence Miss Braley, the assistant principal, has acted 
as principal and performed the duties of the position with 
signal success. 

In closing permit me to bespeak for the school the con- 
tinued confidence and support of the Board, and the co- 
operation of those parents and other citizens who have the 
interests of the school system at heart. 






68 superintendent's report. 

A few statistics are appended showing in condensed 
form some items of interest connected with the school. 

Number of pupil teachers enrolled duriug the year, 35 

" " '' admitted in February, 14 

*• '• *• *' '' September, 4 

•' *' *' j^raduated in February, 8 

'• '* *' '* June, 5 

'• *• *' in Senior class, Dec. 18, 1891. 2 

*• '- •' " Junior class, " •' " 14 

" •* '• •* Sub-Jun. class, ** '' ^* 4 

days subtituting by pupil teachers, 1.59i 

•* •• absence for other causes, 117| 

Total number days absence by pupil teachers, 277 

Average number of pupil teachers belonging, 21 

daily attendance of pupil teachers, 20 

number Seniors and Juniors belonging, 12 

daily attendance of Senior and Junior classes, 1 1 

^* number of pupils belonging to the school, 297 

Number of different visits by parents and others, 4i>4 

SPECIAL SUBJECTS. 

Music. — This branch has been under the charge of the 
present supervisor for a year and a term. His work is 
efficiently done. There is some question, however, wheth- 
er there is not too much technical drill required and at too 
early an age. I am certain from the best information that 
I can get, that much more technical drill in music is done 
in the lowest grades of the public school of this country 
than in Germany. The Germans are essentially a music- 
loving people. Yet pupils are not taught to read music in 
their schools for the first three or four years. A recent 
writer in the schools of Germany says '' The ends sought in 
teaching singing, as given in several courses of study, 
are to sing with ease church chorals and the national 
sonirs. Incidental to this is the cultivation of a musical 
ear and taste, which may be the the foundation for ad- 
vanced study and practice." Again he says, '* One marked 



8tJPBRINTENDENT^8 REPORT. f)9 

9 

characteristic of the singing in all the grades is the sweet- 
nest* and purity of tones. In the lower grades soft and 
low^ tones are constantly exacted." Without venturing to 
express a decided opinion here as to the merits of the two 
methods, I offer the one that contrasts with ours that the 
question may receive future consideration by the Board. 

Xew singing books were put into the fifth and sixth 
grades of the grammar schools during the year. The 
supervisor reports, that good results are already apparent 
froin the change. He states also that the books and 
charts used in the eleventh grade primary are unsuitable 
w figures are printed under the notes. In the new 
editions the figures are not given, and he recommends that 
the old editions be replaced by the new at an early date. 
He also recommends the Second Music Header, Pt. I., for 
use in the t^nth grade, that the pupils may study the 
divided beat. 

The following extracts from his report will give a fair 
idea of the work in the different grades : 

* ' The thirteenth grades have studied the scale chord- 
wise, instead of the old way (step wise) and have now the 
full scale to work with. The pupils can sing quite readily 
at sight, simple exercises in any major key, the teacher 
pointing the time for them. They have learned a number 
of choice rote songs, and in the last term of this year will 
study the easiest exercises on the chart." 

'* The twelfth grades have reviewed the work of the 
thirteenth grades as outlined above, and, in addition, have 
JJ^adea study of each sound of the scale (in all keys from 
thegtaff) through exercises prepared by the regular teach- 
ers from suggestions I have given them. These grades 
^H finish the first series of charts this year.'' 

**The eleventh grades made a study of each sound of 
"^e scale in the fall, and now are all using the First Music 
^^er studying only the songs, that is, those exercises 



70 supekintendent's report. 

having words. They learn the pitch of all the notes on 
the staff, the signatures of the keys, the tune names, and 
to beat the time. They are doing good work." 

" The tenth gmdes are doing the same kind of work a.*^ 
the eleventh, except they tiike the more difficult songs in 
the last half of the l)ook." 

'' The ninth grades are doing better than last year, and 
I intend to get them ' broken in ' to two-part singing the 
last term of this year. Two-part singing should be begun 
not later than the fourth or fifth school year." 

'* The eighth grade is where I found two-part work first 
begun in these schools. It is an important step in the 
course, and requires care and time to get the parts well 
settled. I am glad to say that the teachers are working 
faithfully on this and generally with good results." 

'' Three-part singing is begun in the seventh grade, and 
some very good work is done." 

*' The sixth and fifth grades are doing much bettei 
work since the introduction of the new book. The parts 
are quite well developed, and I am much pleased with the 
way the pupils take hold of the work." 

*' There is an improvement in the singing of the High 
School, but it is not yet what it ought to be. The parts 
are not as clearly brought out as they should be." 

** In closing, I wish to say that I have found the teachers 
ever ready to carry out my ideas and suggestions. They 
have worked faithfully, and whatsoever credit is due for 
the good results accomplished, the largest share Iwlongsto 
them." 

I)kawin(j. — The educational drift is toward industrial 
training. This is taking decided form in the cumcula ot 
the ccmimon schools and in the foundation of many private 
institutions for this kind of teaching. As dmwing is the 
basis of instruction in the industrial aits it is assuming 
each year greater importance in the schools. 



superintendent's report. 71 

N^ew Bedford was one of the first places in the country 
to fecognize its importance in education, and to make it 
an ossential part of its school course. It is needless for 
me to dwell upon its history in our schools. That has 
been done in preceding Reports. I will simply call atten- 
tion to the fact that notwithstanding the length of time 
that has elapsed since it was first engrafted upon the 
schools of this country and this city, it is yet scarcely out 
of the experimental stage. The general plan of teaching 
it in the common schools is:*, however, becoming better 
determined each year. 

For two years or more a course of study in which the 

pai-ts are well related has l)een in process of adjustment to 

the work of the different grades. The good results are 

Wing evidenced. Each year the pupils who graduate 

from the grammar schools show greater knowledge of the 

underlying principles of drawing and possess more skill 

in execution. I believe that in a year or two more no 

raore difference in acquirement will be shown by the 

pupils in this study than in others. For those who attend 

^he High school, the study is optional after the first two 

years. During the past year eight have elected this study 

^^^ the third year and two for the fourth. The work in 

^"e High school is more closely related to that of the lower 

^^0()\ than formerly. The teacher of the subject in that 

^o<W)l and the Supervisor of the work in the lower schools 

^^^ in accord as to methods and aims. 

The teachers in the lower schools are becoming more 
™uiiliar with the work each year. The Supeivisor holds 
P^e meetings for purposes of instruction and general 
*^^^ection. The plan of work is determined for each grade 
*^ this way, and the result is more unity in it in corres- 
ponding grades throughout the city. There are defects 
^ost certainly for which I think there is a remedy, at 
l^tin part. This is not the place, however, to discuss 



I 



72 superintendent's report. 

them. But, I ))elieve after all things are considered, th« 
subject is on a better plane than ever before. 

Sewing. — There is not much that requires consider 
ation in regard to the sewing. A course of study ha 
been prepared within the year and put in operation. It i 
not yet adjusted to quite the best advantage. The sam 
teachers are in charge of the work as for several years past 
More time is given by both of the assistants than foniierl 
owing to the increase of pupils in the schools. The re 
suits compare favorably with those secured in other cities 
I think more of the material employed should be furnishe< 
by the city. Each school |;>uilding should be equippe< 
with the necessary utensils needed in the work instead c 
requiring pupils to bring them from their homes. This i 
a required study, and the city should supply as far a 
practicable all that is necessary for successful work. 

Cooking. — A cooking school as a part of our publi 
school system has been detemiined upon. When a suit 
able building is available it will be put into opei^atior 
Probably nothing will be done in the matter until th 
Kempton Street school house is built. 

I regard the extension of the curriculum still furthe 
into the sphere of manual training as an impoi*tant actio 
of the Committee. It is intended that the girls in the tw 
highest grades gramuiar shall form the classes for th 
school. A certain number will report for duty at th 
cooking school each half day. Each pupil attending th 
school will thus get a half day's instruction every tw 
weeks or twenty lessons a year. The experience in thos 
places where cooking schools have been established in con 
nection with the public schools is that the time given b; 
the gills to the cooking school does not appear to affec 
their standing in their other studies. 

With the sewing, drawing, and the cooking, the girls i 
the lower schools will have valuable instruction in thre 



superintendent's report. 73 

lines of manual training. I sincerely hope that instruc- 
tion in wood-working will be provided for the boys of the 
grammar grades. It would be valuable training for all, 
but especially for a large class of boys to whom school 
work is now irksome. By this line of work, a three fold 
object is accomplished. First, it gives physical exercise 
and training ; second, it engenders habits of close observa- 
tion and accuracy in execution ; third, the moral effect 
produced is wholesome in that a vent is given for activi- 
ties that are frequently the source of mischief, and cause 
friction with the teachers ; and more, when not in school, 
the knowledge of tools gained there will cause many a boy 
to busy himself with making his own playthings or other 
articles, instead of idling away his time acquiring habits 
of discontent or worse ones. What to do with their boys 
when they are out of school is a matter of solicitude to 
many parents. I have recommended in previous Reports 
the extension of manual training into the High School. I 
renew that recommendation here. 

Physical Training. — I wish some system of physical 
ti-aining might be adapted for use in our schools. Physi- 
cal exercises are pi-ucticed in all the grades from the lowest 
primary to the highest class of the High school. But it 
is only in the High school that any real physical training 
is done. The military drill furnishes most excellent train- 
ing for the boys. The effect is soon noticeable in their 
firm tread and erect carriagi^. The girls, who need it 
more, get no similar training. Their dumb bell exercises 
are good but do not give a systematic training. 

The Swedish system of gymnastics is the one adopted in 
Boston and many other places by the school committees 
after giving much thought to the subject and making care- 
ful investigations. 

At the beginning of this year I engaged a graduate of 
the Boston school of Swedish gymnastics to give a short 



74 sitperintendent's report. 

course of illustrative lessons to the teachers of the city, 
that the character and object of the exercises might be- 
come known to them. I think the majority became saf- 
ficiently accjuainted witli the nature of the exerciser to re- 
alize their worth and practicability. I recommend that 
this question be taken under advisement by the Board. 

THK PEDAGOGICAL LIBRARY. 

This libnirv was estjiblished by the School Committee 
with the hope and expectation that the teachers would 
avail themselves of its privileges and do some professional 
reading. If the patronage given it so far measures the 
amount of such reading but little comparatively is done. 
I hope that it is not so, and I am fain to believe that it 
is not. 

Forty-six different teachers only were credited with 
taking even one book from the library the past year. A 
contingent of the teachers to my personal knowledge are 
earnest in their desire to comprehend the underlying 
principles of teaching, and by both professional and 
general study are seeking to qualify themselves for still 
l)etter work. Probably there are many others of whom I 
do not know. I fear there are some who are indifferent 
in the matter, and do not realize its importance. 

No. Title. Author. 

1. The History of Pedagogy Coinpayre. 

2. The Elements of Pedagogy White. 

H. Sy.'^tenis of Edmratioii Gill. 

4. .John Amos Comeniiis T^urie. 

.'). Essays on Educational Heformers .... Quick. 
(J. Particular Systems of Education, Pt. Ill . Kosenkranx. 
7. Higher Schools and Universities in Ger- 
many Arnold. 

s. Some 'Diought^ Concerning Education . . T.ocke. 

1). Emile Housseau. 

10. r^eonard and (Gertrude Pestalozzi. 

11. Levana Richter. 



superintendent's report. 75 

12. 'Fte Education of Man Froebel. 

13. Education Spencer. 

14. lectures and Annual Reports, Vol. 1 . .Mann. 

15. T^^ctures and Annual Reports, Vol. H . . Mann. 

16. T..ectures and Annual Reports, Vol. Ill . Mann. 

17. Ivectures on the Science and Art of Edu- 

cation Payne. 

18. ITie Philosophy of Education Tate. 

19. Tlie Elements of Pedagogy White. 

20. On Teaching: It-s Ends and Means . . . Calderwood. 

21. The Principles and Practice of Common 

School Education Currie. 

22. Lectures on Teaching Fitch. 

23. I^ectures on Teaching . . . . Fitch. 

24. Methods of Historical Study Freeman. 

25. Methods of Teaching History Hall. 

26. How Shall My Child be Taught L. P. Hopkins. 

27. Theory and Practice of Teaching .... Page. 

28. Talks on Teaching Parker. 

21). Art of School Management Baldwin. 

30. Art of School Management Baldwin. 

31. School Management Landon. 

32. On Teaching Geography Geikle. 

33. Education and Educators Kay. 

34. Schoolmaster Ascham. 

35. Outline Study of Man Hopkins. 

36. School Economy Wickershani. 

37. School Room Guide DeGraff. 

38. Manual of Method and Organization . . . Robinson. 

39. T-«ctures on Geography Strachey. 

40. The Action of Examinations I^tham. 

41. Object Tvcssons Walker. 

42. The True Order of Studies Hill. 

43. Ilieory and Practice of Teaching .... Thring. 

44. School Journal, V^ol. J • Mann. 

45. *^ " ^* II . . • *' 

46. *^ '' *• III '' 

47. '' '^ ** IV " 

48. •' " *' V " 

49. " '' '^ VI '^ 

50. '' '' '' VU " 

.51. " '' '' VIII •' 

.52. ** ' •' IX *' 

54. *' '' ''XI * 

«/ti. .i*. II.. ....•< 



76 superintendent's report. 

56. School Journal. Vol. XlIF Mann. 

57. • -' '' '^ XIV •' 

58. Methods and Aids in Geography .... King. 

59. Methods and Aids in Geography .... King. 

60. Contributions to the Science of Educat ion Payne. 

61. Power and Authority of School Officers 

and Teachers 

62. Power and Authority of School Officers 

and 'i'eachers i . . . 

63. Coinpayre's T-,ectures on Pedagogy . . . Payne. 

(»4. Ro8inini*s Method in Education Grev. 

(55. Bibliography of Education Hall. 

<J6. Ii<?ctures to Kindergartners Peabody. 

67. Early Training of Childreji Malleson. 

68. Habit in Education Hall. 

69. Modern Petrography Williams. 

70. The Study of Rhetoric Genung. 

71. English in the Preparatory Schools .... Haffcut. 

7*2. English in the Schools Woodward. 

Hi. How to Teach Reading Hall. 

74. The Study of Latin Morris. 

75. Mathematical Teaching Saflford. 

76. How to Study Geography Parker. 

77. Studies* in Pedagogy • Morgan. 

78. Educational Mosaics Morgan. 

79. Elements of Psychology Hewett. 

80. Topics in Geography Nicols. 

81. ('ompayre's Tjcctures on Pedagogy . . . Payne. 

82. Notes of TiCssons for Y'oung Teachers . . Taylor. 

83. Geogra])hy Teachings and Land Modelling Frye. 

84. Geogra])hy Teachings and Land Modelling Frye. 

85. How to Teach Language Metcalf . 

86. How to Teach Geography Carver. 

87. Arithmetic in Primary Schools Dunton. 

88. (\vclopjedia of Education . Kiddles & Schem, 

89. Orbis Pictus ("^omenius. 

90. Free Schools of the United States . . . . F. Adams. 

91. Prosperity or Pauperism? . Earl of Meath. 

92. Outlines of Psychology Sully. 

93. Primary Education Jacobi. 

94. Order of Exercises in Elocution Parker. 

95. Life and Education of Laura L). Rridgman Lamson. 

96. School Inspection Fearoii. 

97. True Order of Studies Hill. 

98. Kindergarten Culture Hailman. 



supbrdttendent's report. . 77 

^- Edacation and School . . 'I'hrlng. 

1««. Reminiscences of Froebel. by Von ^^^o^ { ytJ'Hol^Xnn. 
^^^' Flducation in its Relation to Manual In- 

dustrv McArthur. 

102. Soliools and Studies Hindsdale. 

103. I'he Quiney Methods Partridge. 

IW. Ttie Teacher Blakiston. 

105. Heports on Elementary Schools Matthew Arnold. 

106*. A^ddresses on Educational Subjects . . . Laurie. 

107. JSoientiflc Industries Explained .... Watt. 

108. T'Jie Teacher Abbott. 

109. Oevelopment of the Intellect Preyer. 

110. M.emory — What it is and how to improve 

it Kay. 

111. ^lethods of Teaching Geography . . . • Crocker. 

112. "Feachers' Manual of Object Lessons . . . Park. 

113. Tbree I^ectures on Education Dr. Oppler. 

114. Obips from a Teacher's Work Shop . . . Klemm. 
n.'). First Three Years of Childhood Perez. 

116. Physical Education Madaren. 

117. School Management Kellogg. 

118. l>ay Dreams of a School Master .... Thompson. 
11». Autobiography of Froebel 

V20. Kducational Theories Browning. 

121. A Tractate on Education .... • • • Milton. 

122. Securing and Retaining Attention .... Hughes. 

123. Three Essays— Study of English Litera- 

ture Blaisdell. 

124. Old Greek Education Mahaffy. 

125. I/)cke-s Conduct of the Understanding . . Fowler. 

126. Giirg School Management . John Gill. 

127. Caltivation of the Memory 

128. Cultivation of the Senses 

129. On Discipline 

130. On the Use of Words 

131. On Class Teaching 

132. Hand bo6k of Punctuation . .• Bigelow. 

133. Book of Object Lessons Lake. 

134. Swedish System of Educational Gymnas- 

tics Baron Nils Posse. 

135. Compayre's History of Pedagogy . . • Payne. 

13^- Pedagogy Hewitt. 

^^' Courses and Methods Prince. 

^38- Peatalozzi, His Life and Work De Guimps. 



78 superintendent's report. 

139. Elementary Psychology Baker. 

140. Linder^s Empirical Psychology De Garmo. 

141. The Mamial Training School Woodward. 

142. Introduction to Shakespeare Corson 

143. Teachers* Manual of Geography .... Redway. 

144. Teachers* Manual of Geography .... Redway. 

145. Insecta Hyatt. 

140. School Hygiene Newsholmo. 

147. Astronomical Geography Jackson. 

14S. Nineteenth Century .\uthors Hodgkin. 

149. The Reproduction of Geographical Forms Redway. 

150. Natural History Object lessons Ricks. 

151 . Essentials of Method De Garmo. 

152. Industrial Education Seidel. 

153. A Conference on Manual Training .... 

154. A History of Education F. V. N. Painter, i« 

155. The Rise and Early Constitution of Uni- 

versities S. S. Laurie, L. I. 

156. The Ventilation and Warming of School 

Buildings G. B. Morrison. 

157. The Senses and the Will W. Preyer. 

158. Education in the United States Richard G. Boone 

159. European Schools L. R. Klemm. Ph 

160. Practical Hints for the Teachers of Pub- 

lic! Schools » George Howland. 

161. School Supervision J. L. Pichard. LI. 

162. Higher Education of Women in Europe Helene Lange. 

mi, A Text Book in Psychology | Johann BYederi 

164. The Mother, Play, and Nursery Songs . . Froebel. 

165. The Paradise of Childhood Edw. Niebe. 

166. Methods in the Schools of Germany . . . John T. Prince. 

167. Old Greek Life . . . J. P. Mahafty. 

168. Homer W. E. Gladstone. 

169. Logic W. S. Jevous. 

170. Classical Geography H. F. Tozer. 

171. Philology • John Peile. 

172. History of Greece C. A. Tyffe. 

173. History of Europe E. A. Freeman. 

174. History of Egypt F. C. H. Wendel. 

175. History of Rome M. Creighton. 

176. Astronomy J. N. Lockyer. 

177. Botany ....... • . . J. D. Hooker. 

178. (Chemistry H. E. Roscoe. 

179. Geology A. Gelkie. 



superintendent's report. 79 

IHO. F*liy8iolo|j^. M. Foster. Hygiene . . . K. S. Traoey. 

J^^ >J'atiiral Resources of the II. 8 J. Harris Pattoii. 

if^'2. C^eo^raphy George Grove. 

183. r^hysical Geography Prof. Geikie. 

184. Iiiuglish Literature Rev. Stopford Brooke. 

1S.5. yCnglish (y'oraposltion John Nichol. 

186. l-*'olitical Economy W. S. Jevons. 

197. ^f ediaeval Civilization G. B. .Vdams. 

188. Ftomao Antiquities A. S. Wilkins. 

189. 'fhe Development of the Roman ('onstitu- 

tion Ambrose IMglie. 

190. C ireek Literature R. C. Jebb. 

191. Kxercises in Wood-working Sickles. 

192. P'^irst r^essons in Wood-working Alfred G. Compton. 

193. f iistory and Science of Education .... Shou]). 

194. Oraded Didactics. Vol. T . . ..... Shoup. 

1»5- Oraded Didactics. V^ol. IF Shoup. 

1^- Ohapters on Plant Life Herrick. 

'•*'• ' nie Three Pronunciation of Latin. . . Fislier. 

195. < 'omparative Geography • . Ritter. 

199. l^oints of History Lord. 

^' Animal Life in the Sea and on the r-.and . Sarah < 'ooper. 

•JOl. <jieographical Studies Ritter. 

'^^^' Kolectic Physical Geography liussell Flinman. 

EXAMINATIONS AND PROMOTIONS. 

'^'^hat kind of examinations shall be given in the 

.schools, how often they shall be given, by whom they 

shall be given, for what purpose they shall be given — 

these are questions that have been rife among educators 

">i* Sometime, but more especially in recent years, (lood 

has resulted from the agitation. It was not uncommon in 

™ past for examinations to be given fiecjuently in the 

^^^ols, and by others than the teachers, upon the results 

^'^hich promotions were based. They w^ere not always 

^^^be line of good teaching. They were a source of 

dread alike to teachei*s and [)upils. They resulted oft- 

^inies in a system of cramming as the work of the teachers 

'•^nd pupils were both judged from the percentages attained 

"J the latter. At last a reaction set in, which may have 



80 superintendent's report. 

gone too far in some places in the other direction, but he 
ter that condition than the first. 

Examinations are either oral or written. Both ha^ 
their place and value when properly applied. Every re< 
itation is in i)art an examination of the teaching as we 
as a test of the amount and kind of knowledge possessc 
by the pupils. Of this every teacher should be conscioui 
and if recitations are uniformly poor, it would be well fc 
him to turn the search-light of criticism back upon hin 
self, if he would discover where the fault lies. 

The chai'acter of the examination given by Superintem 
ent or Committee, and that given by the teachers shoul 
be diflerent. The one should be given to deteimine th 
value of the teaching, both specific and comparative, £ 
discoverable in the amount and kind of knowledge po« 
sessed by the pupils ; while the examination of the teache 
should be given more for the purpose of discovering th 
facts of knowledge retained by the pupils and their growt 
in power. But neither should be given with the primar 
object of detern)ining promotion. 

As the teacher must be the best judge of the attaimneul 
of the pupils under his charge, and of their individm 
capacities, his opinion should have much weight in detei 
mininir their advancement. He should therefore make 
careful study of each pupil ; note his strength as well d 
his weakness ; and, when the time for promotion comes, b 
influenced in recommending the pupil for advancement b 
the future as well as the past. Nor should any te^ichei 
in determining his list of promotions, retard the advanct 
men! of a candidate* only for fear of criticism from th 
teacher of the higher grade. 

Promotions in the j)ublic schools as a rule are governe 
by too rigid rules. The provisions for advancement ar 
not sufficiently elastic. The same discrimination is nc 
made in the interests of the brightest pupils that is mad 



superintendent's report. 81 

against the dullest ones. A just criticism made on the 
public school system is that all pupils must go through 
the same tread-mill. I earnestly wish that some plan 
might l)e adopted in our schools by which pupils capable 
of completing the course in less time than that required 
for the average pupil might do so. It is possible, pro- 
vided there is unity of sentiment in the matter between 
teachers, Superintendent and Committee. 

The general plan adopted for promotions in our city 
varies greatly as to the lower schools and the High school. 
In the lower schools promotions are under the direct 
supervision of the principals, and the general supervision 
of the Superintendent. In all grades below the one fitting 
for the High school, promotions are made virtually on the 
recommendations of the class-room teachers. The prin- 
cipals and Superintendent act simply in an advisory 
capacity. If a class-room teacher recommends a pupil for 
jidvancement on condition even, the pupil is usually given 
a trial in the next grade. If, after a month's trial, he 
proves incapable of doing the work his case is referred to 
the principal or Superintendent, or both, who, if they 
think best, can place the pupil again in the lower grade. 

The regulation governing the admission of pupils to the 
High school is as follows : The principals meet the High 
School Conunittee and Superintendent in conference. 
Each ])rincipal submits three lists of pupils from his 
school. The first lists include the names of those pupils 
that are recommended without conditions ; the second lists 
those pupils that are recommended conditionally ; the 
third lists those })upils not recommended for promotion. 
The pupils of the first lists are usually advanced without 
debate ; those on the second lists are taken undei* consid- 
eration, and usually advanced : those on the third lists are, 
as a rule, considered more carefully and individually. If 
it appears to the C/ommittee that it would be the wisest 



82 superintendent's report. 

thing to do to advance any individual, although not re 
commended, there is nothing in the Regulations of th 
Board to prevent it. The examination given the highes 
grammar grade at the close of each year by the Superin 
tendent is not given to control promotions. 

But if a pupil is once in the High school the whol 
method appears to change. No pupil is to l)e sent baci 
to the grammai* school however inefficient he prove 
to l)e. Pupils are advanced from class to class on pe 
cents, a total of 70 per cent for the year in all studie 
being required for regular promotion. These per cent 
are obtained by the daily or weekly marking of th 
teachers, as eacjh may elect, and from examinations givei 
five times each year, the examinations i-ating as one-thir 
in making up the totiil averages. The companitive stan^ 
ing of pupils in their classes is determined also hy thes 
per cents. 

There are serious objections to this plan of det<*-rminin 
promotions and standing. First, it is cuml)ersonie an 
unreliable; second, it creates an unworthy stimulus i 
pupils, turning their tninds from the true ends of educf 
tion ; third, in its application a burden is inflicted upo 
teachers, whose time can be better employed than in con 
puting pupils' mental acquirements in per cents ; an 
n)ore, injustice to individual pupils is often the result. 

In defense of the first objection I will ({uote the argi 
ment advanced in a (Circular of Information issue 
by the United States Commissioner of Education and pn 
pared by Dr. Emerson E. White, of Cincinnati, Ohi< 
He says : " Persons who have had experience in" pn 
moting large classes of pupils know how difficult it is t 
give due consideration to two separate records. It ma 
be proper to add in this connection, that it is not easy t 
discover the j)rinciples on which these diverse combinatior 
of examination results and class standing are made, or th 



superintendent's report. 83 

facts which determine the comparative value of these two 
factors. Moreover, if the estimates of teachers are trust- 
worthy, there would seem to be no necessity for com- 
bining them with examination results, and, if the examin- 
ation results are reliable, they certainly need not be dis- 
counted by uniting them with the estimates of teachers. 
If both factors are unreliable, how can a reliable result be 
secured bv their union ? This can onlv be tine when the 
erroi-s are in opposite directions ; and why may they not 
l>e ID the same direction ? " 

As to the second objection, I cannot do better than to 
quote again from Dr. White. In speaking of the influence 
of promotion examinations on teaching and study, he says, 
**They set up a low and alluring end for study — the at- 
tainment of examination marks — and they dissipate that 
natural desire for knowledge which is the source and in- 
spii*ation of all true learning and of all real joy in study. 
The more the interest of pupils is focused on the examin- 
ation as an end, the more they fall into the use of memor- 
iter and mechanical methods of study. They work for 
per cents, they cram for per cents, and too often, as it is 
feared^ they cheat for per cents." In the University of 
Michigan the marking system, class rank, honors, or 
pnzes of any kind, except the diploma of graduates have 
^n abandoned, and President Angell claims that the ag- 
gregate result is much better than under the old system. 
I now come to a consideration of the third o})jecti()n, 
loss of energy to the teacher and injustice to pupils. The 
^f^e teacher seeking to develop chai-acter, power and cul- 
^^re in his pupils does not desire to be hampered by a 
'inking hook. He realizes that his attention is divided 
"etween marking and teaching. If the pupil's standing 
*^d promotion depend upon his marks they should be 
^de at the time of recitation, if they are to be at all 
•<*urate ; if recorded but once a week or once a month 



84 supekintkndrnt's report. 

they are valueless so far as accuracy is concerned. Unde 
the second form of recording the work, no matter how jus 
teachers may desire to he, I do not helieve it jmssible fc 
them to mark a class — classes vary in numbers froi 
twenty to fifty pupils- with fairness to the ))u)>ils. 

In our High school there are but a few pupils in a clas 
each year that are not above the limit set for promotion 
Is it necessary that all this cumbersome and perniciou 
machinery be kept at work to detennine whether thos 
few pupils shall be advanced or degraded? Those pupil 
are just as well known to the teachers before look ings 
the marks as after. I hear the feeling exi)ressed some 
times that the standard of the school might deteriorate 
the marking system was abandoned. I think this fear 
unfounded. I do not wish to believe that the majority < 
the pupils work for i)er cents ; if this is so the standard 
false. It is not proposed that pupils should be advance 
whether they are qualified or not ; neither is it propose 
to abandon all records, or examinations. Teachers kno' 
whether their pupils are doing excellent work, or goo 
work, or simply passable work, or poor work. Auc 
when it becomes necessary to record their knowledge, 
can be so indicated. The record cards sent to paren 
may be made out in some such manner. Reasonabl 
parents desire their children to do their duty. They wi 
judge the school by what it makes their children, not b 
what marks it gives them. Those pupils who shirk ca 
be just as well reached and stimulated without a markir 
system as with it. 

I am just as interested to have the standard of tl 
school kept on a high plane as any one. It is far fro; 
my wish to propose any measure that would make tl 
work of the teachers any more burdensome or that of tl 
pupils any less thorough. My wish is, if possible, 1 
lessen the useless labor of the teachers, whose attaiumen 



superintendent's report. 85 

I respect and whose worth I am only too, glad to com- 
mend. And at the same time I desire to free the pupils 
from an unworthy stimulus that is the source of more than 
one evil. 

Examinations and daily markings have been abandoned 
for purposes of promotion in our lower schools. Has the 
time not come for abandoning them in the High school 
also? Examinations should continue to be given in all 
grades, but let them be teaching tests, not promotion 
tests. Let them be both oral and written and searching 
in their nature. Let them be tests of the pupils' work 
and also tests of the thoroughness of the instruction. 
They should not be given at stated intervals, but as cir- 
cumstances suggest their need, and for a detinite purpose. 
They should be given chiefly by the teachers, who would do 
well to remember, that *' of the four-fold object of educa- 
tion — virtue, wisdom, good manners, and learning — the 
laftt alone can be fairly tested in examinations." 



CONCLUSION. 

We are passing through a period that is remarkable for 
the agitation of questions that relate to social interests. 
The complexity of human affairs, which is the outgrowth 
of modem life, is creating issues most perplexing to solve, 
and for which history itself supplies little guidance. The 
**New World" while enabling mankind to throw ofl' the 
shackles of social bondage with which it was enthralled in 
the ** Old World," has, at the same time, opened up vistas 
that disclose new dangers and grave res})onsibilities. 
These have multiplied with astonishing rapidity within the 
last half century. 

The policy of governments, the modes of warfare, the 
methods of conducting financial and commercial operations 



\ 



86 superintendent's report. 

have changed greatly to meet the new conditions, and will 
continue to change. 

The conservatism of the school world, however, has 
been slow to respond to the changed life of the greater 
world that surrounds it. This has been due more to a 
realizing sense on the part of the administrators of the 
schools of the far-reaching etfects of any false move in the 
line of seeming progress rather than to any settled con- 
viction against a change in the plan of education. The 
war between the Sciences and the Classics which culmin- 
ated in recent years has resulted in the enthroning of the 
former in the educational world vested with almost, if not 
quite equal privileges of dignity and honor as the latter. 

And now comes a third contestant for recognition. 
Manual Training. It is really the offspring of Science 
and the Material world. It represents a demand for the 
closer connection of the schools with the pi*actical life of 
the day. The question seems to be already settled as to 
its future tnal. The adaptation to existing conditions 
though rapidly progressing will take time to perfect, and 
the results must lie in the future. I have faith that it is a 
move in the right direction, that will broaden and 
strengthen the usefulness of the schools without impairing 
their work in other lines. 

The schools of our city have ninked well in the past. 
The are in most excellent condition at the present time. 
They are prepared to reach out into these new lines of 
work, and are already doing so. When the decny of a 
former industry, in which this city wan facile princepi*, 
called for a change in the business pursuits of her citizens, 
it was made, and with such wisdom and energy that New 
Bedford is becoming as famous in her new industries as 
she was in her old. And she must not be unmindful that 
as the success of her whaling Heets depended on the sea- 
manship of her captains and sailors, so must the success 



superintendent's report. ^7 

of her manufactures depend on the mechanical skill and 
ingenuity of her artisans. Her schools should supply her 
skilled labor, and, if they are to do it, they should excel in 
those lines which will make it possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. E. HATCH, 
Superintendent of Schools. 
New Bedford, Mass., Dec. 31, 1891. 



88 



ritpbrintbndbmt's rbfort. 



List of Teachers 



Grade. 



1 
2 
2 
8 

H 
4 
4 
4 



HIGH SCHOOL. 
Suinnier St.. between Mill and North 8t8. 

Beeidencc. 
Ray Greene Huling, Principal, 19.5 Cottage street, 
Chas. T. Bonney, Jr., Sub-master, 121 Washington *• 
Chas. K. Allen, Science Teacher, 1 Lincoln 
Sarah D. Ottiwell, Assistant, 74 Keinpton 

Elizabeth P. Briggs. " 366 Union 



ik 



Lydia J. Cranston, 
Lucretia N. Smith. 
Mary K. Austin. 
Mabel A. Spooner, 
Helen L. Hadley. 
Emma K. Shaw, 
Mabel W. Cleveland. 



kk 



i* 

a 

(i 



81 North 
72 Foster 

214 Kempton 
42 Morgan 

196 Griunell 
72 High 
81 North 






Florence Cleaves, Drawing Teacher, 85 Eighth 
John K. McAfee, Military Instructor, 72 School 



I* 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 
Fifth Stkkkt: 

Fifth St., corner of Russell St. 
Allen F. Wood, Principal, 111 Acushiiet Av., 

Lydia A. Macreading. Assistant, 
Harriet F. Hart. 



.5 
(> 
6 
t 
7 
8 
8 
9 
9 



Sarah E. Stoddard, 
Mary E. Allen. 
Emma A. McAfee, 
Janet Hunter. 
Blanch W. Sheldon, 
Mary A. Kane, 
Grace L. (;arver. 



4k 

I. 

kC 



4. 



«k 



17 Bonney St., 
2;i3 Acushnet Av., 
852 County street, 
25 Madison street, 
72 School street, 
.■)5 North Sixth stret 
169 Union street. 
157 (trinnell street. 
147 Acushnet avenue 
185 Fourth street. 



Nancv H. Brooks. *' 

MiDDi.K Stkket: 

Summer St., between Elm and Middle St. 



6 
6 
< 
7 

S 
8 



(George H. Tripp, Principal, 
Agnes J. Dunlap, Assistant. 
Katharine Commerford, **■ 
Etta M. Abbott, '• 

I-.UCV B. Fish, 
Mary M. Robinson, 
Clara B. Watson, 
Maria B. Clark. 



^k 



tk 



F^airhaven, 

117 Hillman street, 

684 County 

108 Schooi 

64 Smith 

25 Chestnut 

87 Fifth 

181 Chestnut 



superintendent's report. 



89 



Gratle. 

9 Mary R. Hiaekley, Assistaut, 

9 Clara S. Vincent, 



ki 



Parker Street: 

Parker St., near County St. 
Charles E. E. Mosher, Principal, 
Carrie E. Footman, Assistant, 
Anna J. Jennings, 
H. Jennie Kirby, 
Martha A. Hemenway, 
Regina M. Paul, 
Mary W. I^ymunion, 
May L. Petty, 
Mariana N. Richmond, 
Mary E. Sturtevant, 
Lizzie E. Omey, 
Emilv A. Delano, 

Thompson Street : 

Thompson St., corner Crapo St. 
* Katharine N. Lapham, Principal, 

Corner Union and Sixth Sts., 



5 

9 
6 

I 

t 

8 
8 
8 
d 
9 
9 



41 

4i 

44 
44 



Beslflence. 


Salary. 


Ill High street. 


$ 600 


233 Middle '' 


600 


rSt, 




92 High sti*eet. 


1,900 


72 State " 


475 


115Maxfleld'' 


600 


50 Hill *' • 


525 


5 Lincoln " 


600 


29 Parker '' 


450 


83 School '' 


600 


22 Pope '* 


550 


34 High 


550 


220 Summer '' 


550 


63 Thomas " 


500 


East Freetown, 


525 



8 
8 
9 
I) 
13 



44 



44 



81 North street, 

46 State '' 

72 Bedford '' 

116 Willis '' 

South Orchard '' 



Cora B. Cleveland, Assistant, 
Elizabeth Bennett. " 

Mary A. Macy, *' 

Daisy 31. Butts, 
Leonora B. Hamblin, 

Harrington Training School : 

Court St., corner of Tremont St. 
Josephine B. Stuart, Principal, 464 County street, 
Anna W. Braley, Assistant, 619 County 

Sixteen training teachers, — Seniors ^4 per week; 
Juniors 83 per week. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 
ACU8HNET Avenue: 

Acushnet Av., near Grinnell St. 



44 



10 

11 

12 
12 
13 
13 
13 
13 



Sarah £. Kirwin, Assistant, 
Hattie L. Finlan, '* 

Clara C. M. Gage. 
Caroline S. Sllva, 
Susan M. Lucas, 
Anna I. Dexter, 
Grace Covell, 



44 



kk 



44 



4( 



1,000 
450 
450 
600 
450 
450 



1,300 
SOO 



194 County street, 


(550 


101 South Sixth '' 


550 


186 County 


550 


78 Mill 


500 


81 Washington -^ 


47r, 


167 North '- 


550 


11 Franklin 


450 


128 School ♦* 


400 



ii 


4» Bedford 




l( 


27 Franklin 




l( 


3(5G Cottage 




n 


315 County 




• 


UOGrinnell 




(fc 


2U9 County 




»fc 


South Orchard 




(fc 


13 Sherman 




4fc 


4(j State 




(fc 


114 High 





90 superintendent's report. 

I. W. Benjamin School: 

Division St., between Acushnet Av., and Second St. 
Grade. Besidefnce. 

Jane K. Gilinore, Principal, 245 Acushnet Avenue, 
10 Susan M. Tompkins, Assistant, 2 Court street, 

10 Nellie W. Davis, 

11 Helen J. Kirk, 

11 Etachel L. Denham. 

12 t^arah A. Winslow, 

12 Helen C. Allen, 

13 Annie C. O'Connor, 
13 Mary Barstow, 
13 Annie L. Brownell. 
13 Susan P. Dinian, 
13 Mabel Bennett, 

Cki>ar Street : 

Cedar St., corner of Maxfield St. 

10 Annie S. Homer. Principal, 117 Hilhnan street, 

11 Bessie P. Peirce, Assistant, 124 Hillman '^ 

12 Abbie D. Whitney, '' 59 Hill 

13 Willetta B. Nickerson. •* 2 Morgan *• 
13 Annie L. Edwards, " 62 North '' 
13 Mabel L. Hathaway, "• 5 Arch •' 

Ckuah (iROvk Street: 

(^^ar Grove St., near Acushnet Av. 
13 I.ucy F. Clark, Principal, 131 Chestnut street, 

13 Mary J. Eldridge, Assistant, 200 South Second " 

13 Eleanor V. Tripp, 

12 Edith K. Weeden, 

12 Annie G. Brawloy, 

11 Carrie A. Shaw, 

10 Flora E. Estes, 

C'axnonvillk: 

Kockdale A v. 

lUandll Adelaide.!. McFarlin, Principal, 152 Kempton striM't, 

12andl3 Llllie C. Tillinghast. Assistant, 273 Kenii>ton ^• 

l)AKT.M(MTii Street: 

Dartihouth St., corner of Hickory St. 

10 Isadorc F. Eldridge, Principal. 2S Sherman street, 

11 M. Eva Schwall, Assistant, 11 Bcmney ** 

11 and 12 Edith M. B. 'I'aber, '^ 82 Wjildeii '' 

12 and 13 Annie F. Smitli, *• IS Bouncy *' 

13 Grace If. Potter, ** 4 Orchard ** 
13 Sarah H. Kelley, '• 24 Seventh '' 



fci 


12 Sherman 


(I 


;i 


014 County 


(. 


Ik 


23 Washburn 


•I 


k % 


lielleville. 




(I 


535 Purchase 


h( 



superintendent's report. 91 



ForRTH Street : 

Fourth St., comer of Madison St. 
Grade. 

10 Sarah H. Cranston, Principal. 

11 Eliza H. Sanford, Assistant, 

12 Sarah E. Sears, '' 

12 Annie L. Macreading, '* 

13 Alice A. Taylor, 
l«i Mvra A. rjea<»h, 






Residence. 


Salary. 


81 North street. 


$ 660 


112 Fourth '' 


550 


21 Griffin ** 


550 


17 Bonney '' 


475 


299 County " 


425 


75 Sycamore *' 


425 



Lindf:^ Street: 

Linden St., near Ashland St. 

10 Elizabeth P. Spooner, Principal, 129 Hillman street, GOO 

11 Isabella Luscomb, Assistant, 245 Cedar ^^ 550 

12 Isadora Foster, " 48 Parker *• 550 

13 Lucy S. Leach, '' 91 Maxfleld '* 550 

Merhimac Street: 

Merriinac St., corner of State St. 

10 & 11 Sarah H. Hewins, Principal, 111 Merriniac street, 600 

12 Addie West, Assistant, 232 Pleasant *' 550 

13 Harriet S. Damon. '' 223 Pleasant '' 500 

Maxfikli) Street: 

Maxfleld St., corner of Pleasant St. 

. ^3 Mary B. White, Principal, 57 Foster street, 600 

^2 Annie E. Pearce, Assistant, 151 Hillman '• 5.50 

^1 Bessie P. Nash, " 1121 Acushnet avenue. .V25 

^^ MaryE. Pasho, ^' 169 Grinnell street, 425 

^^"-i-iAM .Street : 

William St., between Sixth and Eighth streets. 

^^' Eleanor Commerford, Principal, 634 County street, (JOO 

*^ Marv J. Graham, Assistant, 12 Court ^' 5.50 

_ Kate E. Cleary, " 61 Mechanics lane, 5.50 

^•^ Amelia Lincoln, '' 87 Walden street, 5.50 

COUNTRY SCHOpLS. 
^^^- *4nNET : 

Acushnet Av. 
^luiriotte C. Carr, Principal, 56 Spring street, 

^^y^ B. Wheeler, Assistant, 2 Mt. Vernon street, 

^**foline O. Pierce, *' 1 Spruce street, 

^i^Hk's Point : 

Julia A. Fay, Principal, 685 South Water street, 500 



700 
500 
500 



i 



92 superintendent's report. 



Grade. 


Residence. 


Salary. 


North : 






Mary I. Ashley, Principal, 


Clifford, 


$575 


Rockdale : 






Lucy K. Hatch, Principal, 


laS School street. 


600 


Plainville : 






Mary E. Haney, Principal. 


Fairhaven. 


500 



Mir.L SCHOOLS. 
North : 

In Cedar (;rove St. School Building. 

Emma R. Wentworth, Principal, 117 Hillman street, $15.50 per week. 
Kate Sweet, Assistant, 121 Kempton '' 10.62 *' 

South : 

In Thompson St. School Building. 
Lucy.F. Remington, IMncipal, 493 County street, $15.50 per week, 
(lertrude M. Rohinson, Assistant, 25 Chestnut *' 10.62 per week. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 
Drawing : 

Blanche I. George. 20 Seventh street, $l,20() 

Singing : 

F. H. Buttoi-fleld, 40 Chestnut street, 1,700 

Sewing : 

Carrie H. Richmond, HS Seventh street. $550.00 

Eliza A. Smalley, 71 South Sixth street, 295.00 

Gertrude H. Leonard, 62 Fifth street, 393.28 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

Florence Cleaves, $250 

George A. Stetson, 140 

George H. Nye, 140 

EVENING ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 
Fifth Street: 

Oliver W. Cobb. $9.00 per week. 

Mrs. C. T. Johnson, 4.12 " 

Grace H. Potter, 4.12 *' 

Nancy H. Brooks, 4.12 *' 

Annie F. Smith, 4.12 " 

Alice A. Taylor, 4.12 

Annie B. Parker, 4.12 

Nellie H. Cook, 4.12 " 

Julia A. Fay. 4.12 " 

Belle Almy, 4.12 '* 



sdpbrintbndbnt's sbport. 



Su^h E. Stoddard. 
Jennie K. Terry, 
Marj- ,j. Graham. 

Julia <■■, (Jlfford, 
Pakkkr Strket: 
"George H.Triiip, 
Agnes .1. Dunlap. 
I^arah L.Tallman, 
'da A. McAfee, 
M«r_v F. Wilde. 
Ethel Denham, 
R*^KiuB M. Paul. 
f*^i»AR Grove Strrkt 
Allen F. Wood, 
lt«bert«H5lilmr(i, 
Annie G. Brawley, 
Oiiioe C^aner. 
^Hnnl* p. Slocum, 
r»»l»y M. ButM. 

Addle .1. McFarlln, 

"»"-y K. Hinckley. 

Alihy R. Johnuon, 

^r-jtli E. Kirwin. 

=*"»ie P. DInmn. 

Kmnia B. McCuilnaith. 

f-arrle E. Footman, 

^'"■a IieWoK, 

'"»bel S. HoiT. 

''llflMCSON-STBEKT: 

•'<>«eph P. Kmn«dy, 
^>«. 8. C. WheWen, 

"««« L. Rolan, 
^"ole M. King, 
More B. Lee. 
'*»« B. Hamlin, 
"Erruiac Street: 
""■y A. Kane, 



Wy Crowell, 



IWy 

^'•Hche W. Sheldon, 
*"«s« P. Terry, 
"»^1 1-. Itathaway, 



9.01) 
4.12 
4.12 
4.12 
4.12 



4.12 
4.12 
4.12 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 




chool Committee 



OF TIIK 



City of New Bedford, 



%. 



TOQKTlIEIt WITH TIIK 



perintendent's Annual Report, 



FOR THE YEAR 1892. 



XKW BRDFOKl): 

MKRCCJBY PUBLl2$III\r; (\)MI'ANV, I'iMNTKItS TO TIIK CiTY. 



In School Committee, 

Dec. 29, 1892. 

Vo/ed, That the Secretary prepare the Annual Report 
of the School Board, and that 1,200 copies of the same 
be printed. 



Report of the Secretary. 



By direction of the School Committee, I submit to our 
fellow-citizens the following Report for the year 1892. 

STATISTICS. 

I. POPULATION AND VALUATION. 

The population of the city (census of 1880) was 26,875 

The population of the city (census of 1890) was 40,705 

Estimated population of the city (Dec. 31, 1892) is 45,000 

Valuation of taxable property (1892) is $40,274,113 

II. SCHOOL CENSUS. 

School census. May, 1891 (children between Ave and fifteen 
years of age), 7,891 

School census. May, 1892 (children between Ave and fifteen 
years of age), 8,605 



Increase during the year (children between five and fifteen 
years of age), 714 



SCHOOL CENSUS BY WARDS. 





1891. 


1892. 


Gain 


Ward One, 


2,530 


2,882 


352 


Ward Two, 


716 


727 


11 


Ward Three, 


698 


698 




Ward Four, 


452 


489 


37 


Ward Five, 


761 


790 


29 


Ward Six, 


2,734 


3,019 


285 



714 



4 SCHOOL REPORT. 

LOCATION OF CHILDREN BETWEEN FIVE AND FIFTEEN YEARS OF AGE, 
AS KErORTED BY THE CENSUS OFFICERS. 





Attending 
Public Schools. 


Attending Private and 
Parochial Schools. 


AUendlng 
no School. 


Ward One, 


1,117 


1,297 


468 


Ward Two, 


468 


175 


84 


Ward Three, 


573 


44 


81 


Wani Foui-, 


374 


58 


57 


Ward Hve, 


57« 


140 


74 


Ward Six, 


2,055 


586 


378 



5,163 2,300 1,142 

REMARKS ON THE CENSUS. 

The census returns for the year show a large increase 
in the number of children in the city between the ages of 
five and fifteen years. The increase was not so large, 
however, as for the year preceding. The increase from 
May, 1890, to May, 1891, was 1,058; from May, 1891, to 
May, 1892,itwas714, or 344 less than the year before. The 
returns also show that there were 1,1 42 children between the 
ages of five and fifteen years of age who were reported as 
attending no day school. This is a decrease of 217 from 
the number reported the preceding year. This decrease 
is unquestionably due to the amendment in the educational 
law which requires an attendance at school of thirty 
weeks instead of twenty, of all children between eight and 
fourteen years of age. But, as I stated last year, it must not 
be inferred that these 1,142 children who are reported as 
attending no school have not attended school at all during 
the year, or will not. This number includes children 
under eight years of age whose parents had not placed them 
in school at the time the census was taken ; also those are 
included who had completed their school time in compli- 
ance with the school laws and had been granted certifi- 
cates to work. I am satisfied that there are but few 
children in tlie city of school age who do not attend some 
school, either public or private. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 5 
III. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION. 

Hfgli, 1 

Tra-lnin^ school for teachers, 1 

Gr&mmar, 4 

Primary, 11 

Country, 6 
Mill, 

Total, 



2 
24 



IV. SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

Occupied by the schools, 22 

In addition, one class is housed hi a church on Weld street ; two other 
classes are housed in a store on Acushnet avenue, while the alterations 
'm the Cedar Grove Street school house are being made. 

KOOMS USED FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES (DAY SCHOOLS), INCLUDING 

HALLS AND RECITATION ROOMS. 

High, 17 

Training, 9 

firainmar, 39 

Primary, 73 

MUl, 4 

Country, 8 

^ms unoccupied, 2 



Total, * 152 

^ms uBed for both day and evening schools, 24 

^m uged for Evening Drawing school, 8 





V. 


SEATS. 




fll 


Seats Occupied. 


Seats Unoccupied 


H»p school. 




386 


21 


Grammar-schools, 




1,567 


247 


Primary schools, 




2,819 


412 


Training school. 




329 


42 


^Hl schools, 




81 


44 


1 f^ountry Rchools, 




220 


85 



ToUl, 5,392 851 



O SCHOOL REPORT. 

VI. TEACHERS. 

Whole number in service, Dec. 23, 1892: 

High school, 13 

Training school, 18 

Grammar schools, 40 

Primary schools, 67 

CJountry schools, 7 

Mill schools, 4 

Special teachers, 5 

Temporary assistants, 1 

Evening schools, 53 

Total, 208 

vn. PUPILS. 

DAY SCHOOLS, 1892. 

Whole number of pupils enrolled of all ages, 6,713 

Average number pupils belonging, 5,379 

Average daily attendance, 4,823 

Per cent, of attendance, 89.6 

Number of half-days* absence, 194,535 

Number cases tardiness, 12,855 

Number cases dismissal, 18,422 

Number cases truancy reported by teachers, 191 

Number cases corporal punishment, 911 

Half-days' absence of teachers, 1,793 

Number cases tardiness by teachers, 210 

Number visits made the schools by the Superintendent, 483 

Number visits made the schools by the School Committee, 777 

Number visits made the schools by parents and others, 2,938 

EVENING SCHOOLS, 1892. 

Whole number pupils enrolled, 2,192 

Average number belonging, 971 

Average nightly attendance, 703 

Per cent, of attendance, 72 

Total nights' absence, 14,876 

Number of cases tardiness, 1,161 

Number visits by Superintendent, 21 

Number visits by School Committee, 140 



SCHOOL, REPORT. 7 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL, 1892. 

Whole number pupils enrolled, 124 

Average number belonging, 58 

Average nightly attendance, 46 

Per cent, of attendance, 78 

Number visits made by the Superintendent, 3 

Number visits made by School Committee, 3 

COST OF INSTRUCnON PER SCHOLAR BY SCHOOLS. 

In this connection the cost of instruction per scholar is 
based upon the average number belonging to each school 
during the year, and the amount expended for hire of 
teachers, fuel, care of school houses, books and supplies 
(except those furnished from the income of the Sylvia 
Ann Howland fund), the term "care of school houses" 
including only the salaries of janitors. 

Elsewhere in the Report is given the cost, by depart- 
ments, of each pupil, based on the average number 
belonging and the total amount expended for the mainte- 
nance of each department during the year. This last com- 
putation furnishes basis upon which tuition of non-residents 
will be collected. 

Table 1. This table is computed, as in former Reports, 
on the items classified above. 

'^^ cost of maintenance of each seholar in the High school 
'or the year has been, ^9.01 

Grammar schools : 

• 

Fifth Street, $26.28 

^ddle Street, 26.62 

Parker Street, 22.74 

Thompson Street, 23.74 

^mary schools : 

Harrington Trainhig, $22.31 

Acashnet Avenue, 13.92 



8 SCHOOL REPORT. 

I. W. Benjamin, $16.03 

Cedar Street, 19.07 

Cedar Grove Street, 18.23 

Cannonville, 26.85 

Dartmouth Street, 16.22 

Fourth Street, 17.77 

Linden Street, 19.01 

Merrimac Street, 21.19 

Maxfteld Street, 19.81 

William Street, 21.17 

Country schools : 

Acushnet, ' 933.92 

Clarks Point, 27.06 

North, 28.19 

Plainville, 36.84 

Rockdale, 28.09 

Mill schools : 

North Mill, $36.46 

South Mill, 34.51 

Evening schools : 

Cedar Grove Street, $7.00 

Fifth Street, 4.76 

Merrimac Street, 6.39 

Parker Street, 9.22 

Thompson Street, 5.63 

Evening Drawing, 14.82 

The average cost of a 

Grammar school pupil was $24.09 

Primary school pupil was 20.11 

Country school pupil was 31.17 

Mill school pupil was 35.52 

Evening Elementary school pupil was 6.12 

Evening Drawing scliool pupil was 14.82 

The average cost of a day school pupil was $22.79 



ff 



SCHOOL REPORT. 9 

Table 2. The average cost per pupil, by departments, 
based on the average number belonging and total expen- 
ditures for each department, was as follows : 

High school, ^5.45 

Grammar schools, 27.24 

Primary schools, 21.13 

Country schools, 34.76 

Mill schools, 37.82 

Eveaiog Elementary schools, 6.12 

Evening Drawing school, 14.82 

Average cost of a day school pupil, $25.16 

Average cost of an evening school pupil, including drawing 
school, 6.61 

EXPENDITURES. 

RECEIPTS. 
Oeneral and special appropriations, as follows : 

For teachers' salaries, 996,.5()0.00 

Incidentals ^including salaries of otticers 

and janitors, books, supplies, fuel, etc.), 33,000.00 

Repairs of buildhigs : 
General appropriation, ^,000.00 

Special appropriation, 2,000.00 10,000.00 

Special appropriations brought forward from 
1891, ER follows : 

for enlargement of North school house, $1 ,200.00 

For new boiler and setting same. High school, 1,200.00 2,400.00 



Total receipts, $141,900.00 

PAYMENTS. 

for teachers' salaries, $96,086.8 1 

As follows : 

Day schools, $9 1 ,232.84 

Evening schools, 4,8.53.97 

forincldentols, ;«,191.41 

As follows : 

2 



lO SCHOOL REPORT. 

Salaries of officers and janitors, day 

schools, 9l5,835.iK> 

Salaries of janitors, evening schools, 645.50 

LSooks and supplies, 4,164.02 

Fuel, . 5,982.22 

Miscellaneous (including rent of School 
Committee rooms and private buildings 
for school purposes, lighting evening 
schools, lieating apparatus, janitors' sup- 
plies, furniture, freight and carting, etc., 7,868.71 
For repairs of buildings, alterations, and per- 
manent improvements, $12 



fi^ 



Total, $142 



Summary : 
Receipts, 
Payments, 


$141,900.00 
142,059,75 




Deficit for year. 




1 


DOG FUND. 






Balance, Jan. 1, 1892, 
Received, Fe))., 1892, 
Expenditures for 1892, 


$8,851.87 
1,274.42 


$4 
1 


Balance, 




$3 


Received from non-resident pupils, 

*^ ^^ sale of books and supplies, 
'* '* sale of stoves. 


$910.55 

55.58 

9.00 


i 



The above receipts, $975.13, have been paid over 
City Treasurer and placed to account of unappropi 
funds. 

The total amount expended for the schools for the 
1892 exceeded that for 1891 by $14,260.4(>, as follow; 

Pay of teachers (iucniase), $9,944.05 

Repairs and alterations of buildings (iucrease), 5,802.60 $15 
Incidentals (decrease), 1 



Net increase, $14 



SCHOOL REPORT. II 

REMARKS ON THE EXPENDITURES. 

The increase of $14,250.46 in the expenditures of the 
department is abnormally large and calls for an explana- 
tion. As stated in the Report last year, the fiscal year for 
the item "pay of teachers" for the year 1891 was thirty- 
nine weeks ; for 1892 it was forty-one weeks. As the 
pay-roll of day teachers is about $2,250 per week, this 
accounts for $4,500 of the increase. As was stated last 
year, this variation in the fiscal year on the item " pay of 
teachers*' occurs but once in six years. The normal year 
is forty weeks. The whole increase in item "pay of 
teachers" for the year 1892, over that of 1891, was 
$9,944.05 ; subtracting from this sum $4,500 for the two 
extra weeks, leaves $5,444.05 in the item "pay of teach- 
ers'' which is chargeable to increase of salaries instituted 
two years ago and teachers who have been added to the 
corps owing to the increase in the number of pupils. 

In the "incidental" account, the amount expended in 
1891 was $84,687.60; in 1892, the amount expended was 
$83,191.41, or $1,496.19 less. This decrease in the 
amount expended on account of incidentals in 1892 is to 
be accounted for by the fact that in 1891 the I. W. Benja- 
min school was furnished at an expense of $3,000 and no 
large school house was furnished during 1892. 

The account "repairs of buildings" was $12,781.53 
for 1892; for 1891 it was $6,978.93, an increase of 
$5»802.60. The large sum expended for repairs, includ- 

• 

^^g alterations, itemized, is as follows : 

New boiler at High school and setting old one, ^1,376.54 
Renewing and altering sanitaries (one side), 676.89 
«ew sanitaries at Fifth Street school, and expenses inci- 
dent to the change, 1,920.98 
^^w sanitaries at Middle Street school, and expenses 
iJicident to the change, 2,022.06 



12 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Enlarging the North school to a two-room building, $1,585.24 

Building an additional room in the Dartmouth street 
school house attic, 626.09 

Total, #8,207.80 

The remaining $4,573.73 were expended on the twenty- 
two school houses for ordinary repairs, such as carpenter 
work, painting, glazing, black-boards, etc. 

It appears, therefore, that all alterations and permanent 
improvements on school houses in the city for the year, 
except the enlargement of the Cedar Grove Street school 
house, are included under item *' repairs of buildings," It 
is customary in most cities to charge alterations and per- 
manent improvements to a separate account from that of 
ordinary repairs. It is well that this be done, otherwise 
the cost of the schools for running expenses varies from 
year to year to a great degree and the statistics of the 
same are less valuable for comparison than they otherwise 
would be. 

SYLVIA ANN HOWLAND EDUCATIONAL FUND. 

Balance of income on hand, Jan. 1, 1892, $280.36 

Interest for the year, 3,000.00 



Total credit, $3,280.36 

Expenditures for the year, 2,968.38 



Balance, Jan. 1, 1893, $311.98 

Cost of books and supplies during 1892, $2,968.38 

Cost •f books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1892, 137.05 

$3,105.43 

Cost of books and supplies charged to schools, 1892, $2,916.20 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, 1893, 189.23 

$3,105.43 



SCHOOL REPORT. 13 

Disbursements to the several schools, and otherwise, 
are as follows : 

High school, •534.69 

Fifth Street Grammar school, 159.10 

Middle Street '' '• 223.83 

Parker Street '' '* 274.29 

Thompson Street ** " 148.12 

Harrington Training " 100.81 

Aciwhnet Avenue Primary school, 88.96 

I.W.Benjamin " '• 114.26 

Cedar Street " " 77.43 

Cedar Grove Steeet •' "* 109.40 

Cannonville '' " 18.68 

Dartmouth Street *' '* 123.02 

Fourth Street '* '' 58.13 

Linden Street *' " 60.80 

Merrimac Street " " 33.35 

Maxfleld Street '' '' 32.66 

William Street '' " 50.66 

Acushnet " 37.95 

Clarlts Point " .76 

North '' 3.79 

Plainville '' 10.42 

Rockdale '' 9.90 

North Mill '* 16.43 

South Mill '' 49.27 

^'are of musical instruments, etc., 335.85 

Express and freight, 66.78 

Pedagogical library, 37.39 

Hanual training, 8.55 

^vering books, etc., 129.14 

Primary department, 2.00 

Stock on hand, Jan. 1, 1893, 189.23 



DETAILED STATEMENT. 



93,105.43 



Outlay by the School Committee from the income of the 
Sylvia Ann Howland fund, from Jan. 1, 1892, to Jan. 1, 
1898. 

BOOKS AND PERIODICALS. 

American Book Co., S47.42 

^ton School Supply Co., 79.00 



14 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Educator, The, ^21. 25 

Educatioaal Publishing Co., 35.70 

Ginu & Company, 53.08 
Goldthwait, William M., 3.40 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., 103.66 

Houghton, Mimin & Co., 24.63 

Heath, D. C. & Co., 32.42 

Inman, H. 8., 24.00 
Knowlton, D. H. & Co., 2.80 

Lee and Shepard, 93.03 
Leach, Shewell & Sanborn, 9.83 

Lothrop, D. & Co., 10.82 

Mason, Perry So Co., 73.30 

Miller, Samuel E., 49.50 

Silver, Burdett & Co., 44.25 
Small, Willard, 9.00 

Schoeuhof, Carl, 41.30 

Taber, Robert W., 81.16 $< 

PEDAGOGICAL LIBRARY. 

Appleton, D. & Co., $9.10 
American Book Co., 14.92 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., 6.00 

Hatch, Wm. E., 5.00 

Kirkwood, L. J., ,34 

Lee & Shepard, .93 

Taber, Robert W., 1.10 

MANUAL TRAINING. 

Bliss & Nye, 95.00 
Caproni, P. P., 1.75 

Haskell & Tripp, 5.85 

Whiting, E. B. & Co., 2.70 

MUSIC DKPARTMKNT. 

Ginn & Company, $28.50 

Pcirce, George, 436.00 

Richter, (ieorge II. & Co., 14.85 

Silver, Burdett & Co., 247.51 ; 

BINDING AND COVERING BOOKS. 

Gammons, Lottie M., $22.20 

Gibbs, Elizabeth, 21.35 

II olden Patent Book Cover Co., 250.95 
Hathaway, Lottie, 11.10 

Kane, D. J. & Bro., 53.04 



SCHOOL REPORT. I 5 

Merrick, Emma J., $19.15 

Perry, George S. & Co., 27.00 

Potter, Hattle, 23.30 

Watrons, Joseph, 15.00 

Wiug, Charles F., 13.50 1^56.59 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Anthony, E. & Sons, 1^.50 

Hayes, X. P., 82.50 

Hutchiuson, H. S. & Co., .75 

Perry, George S. & Co., 115.13 202.88 

APPARATUS. 

Bliss & Nye, $1.23 

Blake, James E., .50 

DeWolf & Vincent, .24 

Eimer & Amend, 133.32 

Hathaway, Nathan, 1.10 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., 3.50 

Haskins, Charles N., 11.80 

Perry, George S. & Co., 9.00 

Ritchie, E. S. & Sons, 4.65 

Kichards, George D., 9.45 

Sherman, C. R. & Son, 8.52 

Sherman, J. H., 6.00 

'I'aber, Robert W., 1.00 

bright Drug Company, 3.90 

^'ood, Brightman & Co., .59 194.80 

EXPRESS AND FREIGHT. 

Allen's Express Co., $.25 

Gray, Charles A., 9.60 

Hatch A Company, 32.05 

Jenningg, William A., 24.88 66.78 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Boston School Supply Co., $32.00 

Ellis, T^nard B., 2.60 

Heath, D. C. & Co., 14.93 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., .75 

Hammett, J. L., 63.00 

Hayes, N. P., 30.25 

Kane,D. J. &Bro., .50 

Lwnbard, A. M., 60.00 

McAllister, T. H., 40.95 

M*«oa, Perry A Co., 2.00 



I 



l6 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Peny, George S. & Co., $106.02 

Silver, Burdett & Co., 33.60 

Taber, Robert W., 14.25 

Taber, Charles & Co., 27.38 ^28.2 



$2,968.;i 

The expenditures from the income of the Sylvia Am 
Rowland fund are scrutinized with great care by thi 
School Committee, and appropriations are made only fo 
such objects as appear to come under tne terms of th( 
bequest. Such bequests, however, must be interpreted lib 
erally, and it has so been ruled by the higher courts. 

One of the heaviest items of expense annually in thi 
account is the cost of musical instruction in the schools 
This expense is met wholly from the income of the How 
land fund, except the salary of the special instructor 
because music is not required by the laws of the State U 
be taught in the schools. Pianos and organs for the vari 
ous schools are purchased from this fund and the care c 
the same paid from it. There are at present nine pianos ani 
sevent}^-one organs in the schools. All the music book 
are bought from this fund. Reference books and books t 
supplement the various regular text-books, as well a 
illustrative apparatus of all kinds, are purchased from thi 
fund, and form the chief remaining items of outlay. No^ 
and then some small expenditure is made at which h3'per 
critical persons are inclined to cavil, but there is very littl 
just cause for criticism. 

The Committee is never unmindful of its duty in admit 
istering this trust, and strive to carry out its provision 
legally and for the best interests of the schools. 

TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

STATEMENT. 

Cost of books and supplies purchased during 1892, $4,1G4.C 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1892, 1,431.^ 

$5,595.( 



SCHOOL, REPORT. 



17 



Cost of books and supplies charged to schools iu 1892, 
Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1893, 
Cash receipts from sale of books and supplies, 



$3,962.20 

1,013.14 

20.57 

$5,595.91 



The cost in detail of books and supplies furnished the 
several schools for the year 1892, is as follows : 









Supplies. 


Books. 


Total. 


High school, 






$467.32 


9170.28 


$637.60 


Fifth Street Grammar school. 


> 


339.16 


108.93 


448.09 


Middle Street " 


u 




262.95 


203.27 


466.22 


Parker Street '* 


i% 




281.31 


405.67 


686.98 


Thompson St. '* 


i,i 




162.11 


106.63 


268.74 


Harrington Training 


ik 




97.72 


26.67 


124.39 


Acushnet Avenue Primary school, 


60.52 


43 57 


104.09 


I. W. Benjamin 


»( 


ki 


117.36 


41.71 


159.07 


Cedar Street 


(( 


k( 


60.91 


30.55 


91.46 


Cedar Grove Street 


hi 


is 


79.48 


20.33 


99.81 


Cannonville 


a 


(k 


16.87 


2.40 


19.27 


Dartmouth Street 


k( 


n 


93.08 


46.42 


139.50 


Fourth Street 


(( 


a 


56.22 


55.82 


112.04 


Linden Street 


(( 


14 


41.64 


19.38 


61.02 


Merrimac Street 


a 


ii. 


30.00 


9.07 


39.07 


^axfield Street 


4( 


a 


30.43 


9.98 


40.41 


William Street 


ii, 


a 


32.49 


28.16 


60.65 


North Mill 




fcfc 


7.93 


29.41 


37.34 


South Mill 




u 


5.85 


9.70 


15.55 


Acushnet 




a 


18.74 


19.58 


38.32 


Clarks Point 




i( 


14.93 


14.50 


29.43 


North 




i( 


14.79 


5.72 


20.51 


Plainville 




ii 


12.56 


6.13 


18.69 


Rockdale 




(( 


15.98 


18.21 


34.19 


Cedar Grove Street Evening 


a 


8.30 




8.30 


Fifth Street 


(i 


4( 


6.62 




6.62 


Merrimac Street 


(( 


t( 


7.67 


33.11 


40.78 


Parker Street 


ii 


kfc 


2. -24 


8.75 


10.99 


Thorapaon Street 


bi 


a 


5.17 


13.12 


18.29 


Evening Drawing 




a 


111.49 




1 1 1.49 


Office Superintendent of Schools, 


13.29 




13.29 



$2,475.13 $1,487.07 



$3,962.20 



3 






l8 SCHOOL REPORT. 

The average cost per pupil in the different departments 
of the schools, for books and supplies, has been as fol- 
lows : 

High school, $1.73 

Grammar schools, 1.17 

Primary schools, .33 

Country schools, .68 

Mill schools, .57 



Average for day schools, $.69 

Eveniag Elementary schools, .09 

Evening Drawing school, 1.91 






The sum expended for books and supplies for the year 
1892 was but $54.17 more than for the year 1891, 
although there were more than three hundred additional 
pupils in the schools. The average cost per day pupil 
was sixty-nine cents, four cents less per pupil than for the 
preceding year ; for an Evening Elementary school pupil, 
nine cents per pupil, or two cents per pupil less ; for an 
Evening Drawing school pupil, eight cents a pupil more ; 
but as there are but few pupils in the Evening Drawing 
school, the latter increase meant the expenditure of not 
more than five dollars in excess of the year before. The 
table above shows the expense per pupil in each depart- 
ment. 

Under the free text-book system there is increased 
efficiency in the schools and a great saving of money. As 
the matter is now handled the cost is reduced to a mini- 
mum. The books and supplies are carefully distributed 
and preserved. The average life of a book in constant 
use is from three to five years. The length of time for 
which a book may be used varies both with the kind of 
usage and the size of the book. 

Pupils, as a rule, take very good care of their books and 
utensils, and the teachers feel that it is part of their duty 



SCHOOL REPORT. I9 

to guard against loss and waste. When the fact is recog- 
nized that for an expenditure of sixty-nine cents per pupil 
all the regular text-books, all the slates, paper, pens, ink, 
drawing material, etc., are supplied, it will be granted that 
economy and care are exercised in distribution and use. 
Pupils who lose or willfully destroy or deface their books 
are compelled to pay for them. 

The law which compelled cities and towns to furnish 
fVee text-books and supplies to the pupils of the public 
sc^hools has in its operation proved to be a wise and bene- 
ficent one. 

SCHOOL HOUSES AND GROUNDS. 

Some idea may be gained of the changes that have 

c>ccurred in the schools of our city during the last thirty 

years from the one fact that while there are three times as 

nnany pupils in the city as there were thirty years ago and 

twice as many in the public schools, the number of build- 

itigs occupied by the public schools is exactly the same 

^ow as then, namely, twenty-two. 

Three times as many pupils in the city, the same num- 
ber of school houses, — in this fact alone is revealed great 
changes. Had the same policy been pursued during the 
last thirty years as before that time, and no pupils had been 
withdrawn into parochial schools, the city would now be 
supporting sixty-six school houses instead of twenty-two ; 
and yet the question is sometimes asked, "Why does it 
require so much more to care for the school houses of the 
city lo-day than it did thirty years ago ?" 

One who asks such a question cannot be aware that 
while the twenty-two school buildings owned by the city 
^irty years ago contained only about eighty rooms, those of 
to-day contain one hundred fifty-two rooms. Neither 
^n he know that in the present buildings are housed more 



20 SCHOOL REPORT. 

than twice as many pupils ; that while the majority of the 
former buildings were cramped in all their appointments, 
the modern ones are roomy, having broad hallways, wide 
stairways, easy of ascent, as well as more of them ; that 
they are equipped with better systems of heating and 
ventilating ; that they are better lighted, and furnished with 
many things that preserve the health of teachers and 
pupils and add to their comfort. 

When all these things are considered, the question, 
Why is the cost of maintenance so much greater? 
answers itself. For every added convenience and com- 
fort costs, whether in the home or the school. Good side- 
walks, good streets, sewers, and all the other things that 
add to public convenience and safety cost much to con- 
struct and maintain ; but they are considered absolutely 
necessary to the welfare and prosperity of modern civil- 
ized communities. And the modern school houses, if they 
do cost more to put up and maintain than those of the old 
style, are now considered necessary to the health and com- 
fort of the children of the community. 

It is true, however, that the chief points to be considered 
in building new school houses are : First, that the sites 
chosen for them be dry and healthful, and, if possible, 
have pleasant surroundings ; second, that the buildings be 
substantial and safe structures, well-lighted and properly 
heated and ventilated. Safety and convenience should 
never be sacrificed to ornamentation. Certainly money 
should not be expended in building school houses elaborate 
in design, if the school department is to be cramped 
thereby in its expenditures for the more essential matter 
of instruction. 

The present condition of the school houses of the city is 
in the main good. The Fourth street and William street 
buildings are the most unsuitable of any. The Fourth 
street building and the Acushnet avenue building, which 



SCHOOL REPORT. 21 

furnish accommodations for pupils of adjoining districts, 
are also too small to meet the demands made upon them. 
Forthe past year two basement rooms have been occupied 
in the Acushnet Avenue school and a class of thirty-five 
lias been located in one of the corridors. An eight or ten- 
room building located on the Fourth street lot would 
relieve the present undesirable condition of affairs in the 
Fourth Street school and in the Acushnet Avenue school. 

Upon the completion of the new building on the Kemp- 
ton street lot, the pupils will be transferred to it from the 
William Street school and that building can be abandoned 
or remodeled for other purposes. As the School Commit- 
tee rooms and the offices of the Superintendent of Schools 
are now located in a rented building, the lease of which 
expires in another year, it might be advisable either to 
alter over the William street building for school offices or 
remove the present building and build a new one upon the 
Jot for that purpose. 

The school houses in the south part of the city are now 
taxed nearly to their capacity. If another room is finished 
off in the attic of the Dartmouth street building this sum- 
nier, the demands may be met for a year longer in this 
section of the city, as there is a vacant room in the third 
story of the Thompson street building and a portion of the 
hall in the I. W. Benjamin school is not yet in use. 

An addition is being put on the Cedar Grove Street 
school house which will make it a fifteen-room building, 
the largest in the city. Its completion will permit a 
readjustment of the schools in the north part of the city 
and the surrender of the store and church which have 
been rented for some time. The building is to be heated 
and ventilated by the Fuller-Warren system, which, 
although it was not the choice of the School Committee, 

• 

18 said to do effective work. It certainly should, for it is 
^ery expensive and requires a great deal of space. 



22 SCHOOL REPORT. 

The North school has been enlarged from a one-roon 
to a two-room building, and the whole building is nov 
heated by a furnace. Also a room was built in the thin 
story of the Dartmouth Street school. New sanitaries o 
the Smead patent have been placed in the Fifth Street and 
the Middle Street school houses. These latter changej 
were costly to make but were necessary, and the system: 
in operation meet with the approval of the Board o 
Health. 

Several of the school yards have been covered witl 
stone screenings, as recommended in the Report last year 
making them much more suitable for play grounds. Oni 
hundred shade trees have been set out about the schoo 
grounds and the surroundings of several of the schoo 
houses made attractive in different ways. 

The school buildings require a considerable outlay eacl 
year in ordinary repairs and refurnishing. The usua 
amount has been done during the past year, and over al 
such expenditures the Committee exercises a careful over 
sight. 

For the various sub-committees. 

WM. E. HATCH, 

Secretary. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 23 



In School Committee, 

December 29, 1892. 

On motion of Mr. Godfrey : 

Voted unanimously^ That the thanks of this Board are hereby ten- 
tiered to his Honor, the Mayor, for his uniform courtesy and kindly 
inteotioDS manifested toward this Board during his administration. 

Od motion of Mr. Tompkins : 

Voted unanimously^ That the thanks of this Board arc due and are 
hereby tendered to the Vice-Chair man, William H. Pitman, for his cour- 
tly as presiding oiiicer and his prompt attendance at all meetings. 

Od motion of Mr. Sayer : 

Voted unanimoushj^ That the thanks of this Board are due and are 
hereby tendered to our Secretary and Superintendent, William E. Hatch, 
not only for his uniform courtesy and kindness to this Board, but for 
hw interest manifested in our schools. No obstacle seems too great for 
Wm when he can advance the interests of the department. 



24 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION EXERCIS 

No graduation exercises were held this year, 
schools were closed two weeks earlier than usual, 
to the prevalence in the city of dangerous epideni 



eases. 



GRADUATES, 1892. 



RECIPIENTS OF DIPLOMAS. 



Zenas Marstou Briggs, 
Charles Frank Connor, 
Theodoi-e Chad wick Gifford, 
Arthur lugraham, 
Winthrop Curtis Knowles, 
James Slierwood Mclntyre, 
Mark Henry Mclutyre, Jr., 
Grcorge Wa?*hingtou Paine, Jr., 
Frederick Talcott Hoacli, 
Frederick James Russell, 
John Rudolph Thuman, 
Benjamin Clark Tripp, 
Annie Seabury Allen, 
Mary Abby Allen, 
Sophie Thomas Anthony, 
Lucia Ella Bliss, 
Leona May Bosworth, 
Delia May Butler, 
Susan Elizabeth Hodmau Butts. 



Bertha Frederick Carl, 
Abbie Maria (.'hurch, 
Lottie Tal>er Cole, 
Mabel I^Awreuce Davis, 
Florence Evelvn Farwell, 
Susan Rawson Gardiner, 
Lizzie Dexter Hicks. 
Alice Frank llowland, 
Margaret Estelle Howland, 
Ruth Emily Uowland, 
Lydia Hathaway Hunt, 
ICtta Francis Ijawreuce, 
Jennie Stowell Lewis, 
Allie Whitfield Omev, 
Maud Elizabeth Palmer, 
Nellie Bradford Tillson, 
Mary Lothrop Webster, 
Mattie Ellen Williams, 
Martha White Wood. 



RECIPIENT OF CERTIFICATE. 



Leroy Franklin Bliss. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



25 



NEW BEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

HATES OF TUITION FOR NON-RESIDENT PUPILS, 1893. 



Uigh school, 
Grammar schools, 
rrimarv schools, 
Ungraded schools, 
5!?5ing Drawing school. 



First Second 
Term. Term. 



$19.40 I 

9.53 I 
7.40 

12.17 1 



$13.S7 
G.81 
5.28 

8.G9 



Third ! For the 
Term. Year. 



$22.18 

10.90 

8.45 

13.90 



. I 



$55.45 
27.24 
21.13 
34.75 
14.82 



26 SCHOOL REPORT. 

RULES GOVERNING TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

Maximum. Minimum. 

Principal of High school, $2,750 

Sub-master of " 1,600 

Teacher of science of ** 1,500 

Lady assistants of ^' 900 $050 
Teacher of drawing and assistant in English at 

High school, 050 

Military instructor of High school, 300 

Principals of grammar schools, 1,900 

Assistants of grammar schools, 600 425 

Principals of primary schools, GOO to 775 

Assistants of primary schools, 550 .'175 

Principal of Training school, 1,300 

Assistant principal of Fraining school. 850 

Seniors in Training school, 4 per week. 

Juniors in Training school, 3 ^^ 

Ungraded schools^ 525 to 700 

Principals of evening schools, 3 per night. 

Assistants of evening schools, 1.37i ** 
Supervisor of drawing in grammar and primary 

schools, 1,200 

Supervisor of music. 1,700 

Teacher of sewing, 550 

Assistants at tlie rate of 491 

The salary of a primary school principal of a four-room 
building is $600 per year, which is increased at the rate of 
$25 for each additional room. 

The salaries of assistant teachers in the High school 
are increased at the rate of $50 per year until the maximum 
is reached. 

The minimum yearly salary of a grammar school 
assistant is fixed at $425, and the yearly advance is $25 
per year until a yearly salary of $500 is reached ; the 
annual increase is then $50 per annum until the maximum 
($H00) is reached. 

The minimum yearly salary of a primary school assis- 
tant is fixed at $375, and the yearly advance is $25 per 
year until a yearly salary of $450 is reached ; the annual 
increase is then $50 per annum until the maximum ($550) 
is reached. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



^ t-ONldTION. 



ijAcuHliiict Avenue, 


lllriclt. 


^Acirnhnnt, 


IWood. 


it.W. Benjamiu. 


BHcli. 


<(«lar Street, 


Wood. 


3 Cedar Grovi; Strert, 


Iltricii. 


SCsoDonvllle, 


Wood. 


riUrks Point, 


iWood. 


SiDartmoutli Street, 
9^ Fifth Street, 
lOFourtii Street, 


'wood. ■ 


Brick. 


Wood. 


iiiiiaii. 


, Brick. 


ItlHarriDKton Training, 


Brick. 


ISLlDden Stmt, 


Wood. 


11 Middle Street, 


Brick. 


l^Serrimac Street, 


■Brick. ! 


^H«3rfleld Street, 


! Brick. 


llSftith, 


Woo-i. 1 


W i^rker Street, 


1 Brick. 


HtlPlalnville, 


!Wo«i. 


«%ckdale. 


.Woo.i. 1 




Brick. 


wwiiiUm Street, 


IWood. 1 



f 427 Good. 
I lUGiiOfi. 
1, .i37Go(i«l. 

267 Good. [ciiliirKi'd. 

4IKiUood. in lieiii;; 

S^ Piiir. 

35 Fuir. 

:mi Good. 

l' 4W)Gowl. 

I 2i)7 Old and |m>oi'. 

I 407 Good. 

I 371 Good. 

! 2:1 > Fair. 

I 41UGo<hI. 

I i-KiGood. 

240 Good, 

' 72 Good. 

t; ,~>(ie<>ood. 

■JfiFalr. 

1 ■12tl tiiiml. 

I 1H1 IHd mill ]«»»: 



28 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



CO 

O 

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SCHOOL RKPORT. 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



NAME OF SCHOOr,. a fe ^ E J^ ^ ° i'* S S J a -f 

._ ^^ ji^l "^-^ ^! ^"^ .g^r" g^ a 

redur *ir<>ve Street Evnrilnjr. '514215 255 72.1 a,6li5; 352 11 8 

Fifth Stri'Cl '• 5SR332 140 72.2 6,060 531 4 

Mcrrimac Street " 406 I4U.2105.0 78.5 1.536 12ll 4 1 

Parker Street " 218 lOO.Si 77.6 76.4 1,201 fil 4 1 

'ilioinpson Street " .468174.9124.9 71.4 3,414 96 4 

■21J)a 071.3 70;j.l 72.:! 14,876,1,161' 27 j 1 

Kveiilng DrftwIuR. 124' 58.2 45.5 78.2 ; s! 



30 SCHOOL REPORT. 

CALENDAR, 1898. 

Winter term begins Jan. 9, 1893 ; ends April 14, 1893. 
Summer term begins April 24, 1893 ; ends June 30, 1S93. 
Fall term begins Sept. 5, 1893 ; ends Dec. 22, 1893. 

VACATIONS. 

April 15, 1893, to April 23, 1893. 
July 1, 1893, to Sept. 4, 1893. 
Dec. 23, 1893, to Jan. 7, 1894. 

HOLIDAYS. 

Every Saturday ; Washington's Birthday ; Fast Day ; 
Memorial Day ; Labor Day ; from Wednesday noon before 
Thanksgiving, the remainder of the week. 

SCHOOL SESSIONS. 

From March 1 to November 1, 9 a. m. to 11.30 a. m., 
and 2 i». m. to 4 p. m., in the grammar schools; 9 a. m. 
to 12 M., and 2 p. m. to 4 p. m., in the primary schools. 

From November 1 to March 1, the afternoon sessions 
are from 1.30 o'clock to 3.30 o'clock, in the grammar and 
primary schools. 

High school, 8.30 a. m. to 1.30 p. m., during the whole 
year. 

The signal 22 (that is, two strokes, an interval, and the 
two strokes repeated) sounded on the fire alarm at 8.1o 
a. m. will indicate no school in the primary and grammar 
grades and the Acushnet school in the forenoon. The 
same signal sounded at 12.45 p. m. will indicate no school 
in the primary and grammar grades and the Acushnet 
school in the afternoon. If the signal is sounded at 8.15 
A. M. and not repeated at 12.45 p. m., there will be a 
school session in the afternoon. This rei^ulation does not 
apply to the High school or to the country schools except 
the Acushnet school. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 31 

SCHOOL BOARD, 1892. 

CHARLES S. ASHLEY, Mayor, Chairman, ex^ffleio. 



WILLIAM H. PITMAN, Vlce-Chairnan. 



WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 
WILMAM G. KIRSCHBAUM, President of Common Council, ex^jftrio. 



Ward J— John H. Lowe, Luther G. Hewlns, Jr., Anna R. Borden. 
IfarJ 2— Isaac B. Tompkins, Jr., Frank A. Milliken, Thomas Mack. 
Ward 5-William R. Channing, William H. Pitman, Stephen H. Shepherd. 
H^ard ^-William E. Brownell, Seth W. Godfrey, George H. Dunbar. 
HW .5— Jonathan Howland, Jr., William L. Sayer, Fred. A. Bradford. 
Ward ff^Betsey B. Winslow, Francis M. Kennedy, Thomas Donaghy, Jr. 



STANDING COMMrrrEES. 

William E. Hatch, Secretary. 

On ffigh School — Dunbar, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Pitman, Tomp- 
Ifins, Shepherd, Mack, Hewins. 

On Grammar Schools — ^Tompkins, Pitman, Ilowland, Bradford, Dun- 
f>ar, Mrs. Borden, Lowe, Sayer, Milliken. 

On Primary S-Jwols — Shepherd, Pitman, Tompkins, Miss Winslow, 
Hewing, Kennedy, Godfrey, Channing, Mrs. Borden. 

On Country Schools — Lowe, Donaghy, Mack, Hewins, Brownell, 

^'haoning. 

On Training School — Pitman, Hewins, Kennedy, Milliken, Sayer, 
inning, Brownell. 

On rr«a/U«— Donaghy, Kennedy, Bradford, Godfrey, Sayer, Milliken. 

On Mill Schools— ^rs, Borden, Howland, Lowe, Donaghy, Bradford, 
Godfrey, Brownell. 

On Eoening Schools— Kennedy^ Lowe, Mack, Donaghy, Godfrey, Milli- 
ken, Channing. 

OnM'uic — Bradford, Sayer, Milliken, Godfrey, Shepherd, Brownell. 

On Manual Training —SsLyer^ Miss Winslow, Donaghy, Dunbar, Mack, 
^frey, Kennedy, Mrs. Borden, Hewins. 

On Examination of Teachers— DiuibsLV^ Kennedy, Miss Winslow, Mrs. 
w>nien, Hewins, Pitman. 

On Text- Books— PitmAHy Kennedy, Mack, Milliken, Savor, Brownell. 

On Expenditures — Howland, Tompkins, Pitman, Bradford, Mack, lA)we, 
*^»^hy, Shepherd, Kirschbaum. 

On Howland Fund — Howland, Tompkins, Dunbar, Pitman, Bradford, 
Kennedy, Shepherd, Kirschbaum. 

On fi(tle«— Pitman, Dunbar, Howland, Tompkins. 

On Pay-Ro//«— Tompkins, Howland, Mack. 



32 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



SCHOOL BOARD, 1893. 

JETHRO C. BROCK, Mayor, Chairraau, ex-^fflcio. 
WILLIAM II. PITMAN, Vice-Chairmau. 



WILLIAM E. HATCH, SecreUry and Superintendent. 

Office, 133 William street. 
Office Hours, 8^ to 9 a. m., 12^ to I p. M. Siitunlays, 9 to 94 a. m. 



SAMUEL C. HART, President of Common Council, ex-officio. 
Regular meet! nffs of tlie Boanl, first Monday of eacli mouth, at 7.30 p. M. 



Ward One. 

Place of BueineBs. 

925 Acushnet avenue, 
Bennett Mill. 

Ward Two. 

285 Pleasant street, 
Isaac B. Toniplcins, Jr., 78 Union street, 
Franli A. Millil^en, 43 William street. 

Ward Three. 

Stephen H. Shepherd, Standard Office, 
William R. Channing, 192 Union street, 



Name. 
Anna R. Borden, 
John H. Lowe, 
T^wis E. Bentley, 

Edward T. Tucker, 



Residence. 
Ashland and Austin sts. 
931 Acushnet avenue. 
40 Bowditch street. 

285 Pleasant street. 
(391 County street. 
290 Pleasant street. 

84 Maxtield street. 
91 Mill street. 



William H. Pitman, 



Five Cents Savings Bank,60 Chestnut street. 
Ward Four. 



George II. Dunbar, 

William E. Brownell, 271 Union street, 

Seth W. Godfrey, 

Ward Five. 



179 William street. 
271 Union street. 
17 Bethel street. 



Robert W. Taber, 

Jonathan llowland, Jr., 

William L. Sayer, Mercurv Office. 



Purchase and High sts., 48 Fifth street. 

54 Russell street. 



Joseph C. Pothier, 
Betsey B. Winslow, 
Francis M. Kennedy, 



Ward Six. 
240 Fourth street, 

Eddy Building, 



76 So. Sixth street. 

240 Fourth street. 
315 County street. 
91 Washington street. 



P:MMA M. ALMY, superintendent's Clerk. 

HENRY SMITH, Truant Officer, 372 CottAge street. 
Oflice Hourd, 12i to 1 P. M.; Saturday «, to 9| A. M. 



GEORGE K. DAMMON, Assistant Truant Officer, 137 Smith street. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 33 

STANDING COMMriTEES. 
William E. Uatch, Secretary. 

The flr!»t named on eacb standing committee Is Cbaiiman of the same. 
On High /SteAooZ— Pitman, Dunbar, MUs Wiuslow, Mrs. Borden, Tomp- 
t iQ8, Shepherd, Sayer, Howland. 

On Grammar Schools -Tompkins, Pitman, Howland, Dunbar, Mrs. 
onlen, Ix>we, Sayer, Milliken, Channing. 

On Primary Si'hools — Shepherd, Pitman, Tompkins, Miss Wlnslow, 
enuedy, Godfrey, Channing, Mrs. Borden, Tucker. 
On Country Schools — Lowe, Brownell, Taber, Bentley, Pothier, Tucker. 
On Training School — Pitman, Kennedy, Milliken, Sayer, Channing, 
rownell. Miss Wlnslow. 

On Truants — Godfrey, Channing, Milliken, Pothier, Bentley. 
On Mill Schools — Mrs. Borden, Howland, Lowe, Godfrey, Brownell, 
entlev. 

On Evening Schools — Kennedy, Lowe, Go<lfrey, Milliken, Channing, 
Tuclcer, Bentley. 

On 3/U91C— Milliken, Godfrey, Shepherd, Brownell, Taber, Pothier. 
On Manual TTrafninr/— Sayer, Miss Winslow, Dunbar, Godfrey, Ken- 
'i^edy, Mrs. Borden, Tucker, Pothier. 

On Examination of Teachers — Dunbar, Kennedy, Miss Winslow, Mi's. 
I^rden, Pitman, Tucker, Brownell. 

On Text-Books— PitmsLU, Kennedy, Milliken, Sayer, Brownell, Taber. 
On Expenditures — Howland, Tompkins, Pitman, Lowe, Shepherd, 
Keimedy, Milliken, Tal>er, Hart. 

On Howland Fund — Howlund, Tompkins, Pitman, nun1>ar, Kennedy, 
Shepherd, Taber, Hart. 
On Rules — Pitman, Dunbar, Howland, Tompkins. 
Oft PafHRolls — Tompkins, Howland, Taber. 



34 SCHOOL REPORT. 



%n ^tnnovimn, 



ELIZABETH VV. STANTON, DIED, MAY 17, 1802. 

Mrs. Stanton had served as a member of the Sch( 
Board for ten years, and at the time of her death had 
unexpired term of two years to serve. 

The following resolutions were passed by the Sch< 
Board in testimony of the worth and services of their c 
league : 

The School Board is again called upon to record 1 
loss of a tried and valued member through the interpc 
tion of the Divine will. 

In the death of Mrs. Elizabeth W. Stanton this B02 
is deprived of the counsels of one who was actuated b] 
conscientious endeavor to serve, with honor and fideli 
the public who had repeatedly cHbsen her as one of 
representatives to conduct a most sacred trust. 

Although possessed of a character framed on stro 
convictions, her opinions were always advanced with 1 
modesty of one who recognizes the fallibility of hum 
judgment. And in all her relations with the memb< 
of the Board she commanded their highest respect a 
esteem. 

Mrs. Stanton was ever mindful of all the interests of 1 
schools, but she considered most wisely that the welfj 
of the children was paramount to all other conside 
tions. 

The heartfelt sympathy of this Board is extended 
the bereaved husband and children of the deceased 
their great trial. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, 



FOR THE YEAR 1892. 



Report of the Superintendent. 



To the School Committee : 

Ladies and Gentlemen, — I hereby submit to you my 
fifth annual Report. It is the thirty-second of the series 
of Annual Reports of the Superintendent of Schools of 
^hecity. By a vote of your Board, this Report, together 
^vith that of the Secretary, is to constitute the Annual 
Report of the School Committee. 

These annual reports, which contain certain facts con- 
cerning the condition of the schools, which portray in a 
Pleasure the line of work they are doing, and, perhaps, 
include some suggestions as to needed improvements, 
appear to vary but little from year to year. In each last 
Report, as a rule, no startling change is shown to have 
occurred since the preceding one was issued, either in 
the general administration of the schools, or in the studies 
pursued in them, or in the methods of discipline and 
instruction. But an examination of any number of these 
Reports extending over a series of years reveals that forces 
have been at work constantly in the schools that either 
n^ake or mar, just as in all the other spheres of life. The 
changes that were made from time to time were so slight, 
or so subtle, that they attracted, perhaps, little or no 
attention while they were being made, but the result as 
shown at the last is a marked change from previous con- 
dition. 



38 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Since the first Annual Report of the first Superintendent 
of Schools in this city was issued, changes so great have 
occurred in every department of the schools, that had he 
foretold them at the time he wrote, he would have been 
considered a visionary and a dreamer. The school build- 
ings of thirty years ago, with their faulty arrangements, 
their poor methods of heating and ventilating, neither 
well lighted nor attractive, have been almost wholly 
superseded by far superior ones. New branches of study 
have been introduced, and now the training of the hand is 
linked to the development of the mind. Books and illus- 
trative apparatus embodying the best thought of the day 
are free to the hand of every pupil. Teachers are 
required to be better prepared for their profession by a 
wider range of study and by special training. The 
methods employed in instruction are more rational, for 
they are based on principles that take into consideration 
to a greater extent than formerly the laws that govera 
mental growth and development. 

Whatever may be said in favor of, or against these 
changes that have taken place in the schools, they have 
come by the will of the people, acting through their 
proper representatives. The mainspring of action that 
has produced them has been the belief that they were 
necessary to the welfare of the children, and to enable 
them to go forth from the school room well equipped ta 
meet the rapidly varying conditions of the life of this 
generation. 

The demands for greater security to life and health, for 
higher skill in dealing with the forces and materials ol 
the physical world, for more of the comforts and con- 
veniences of life for all persons while pursuing their dailv 
vocations, — all of which exist in every other pursuit o' 
life, — could not fail to seek recognition in the schools 
They have found such recognition, and the result is ^ 



SCHOOL REPORT. 39 

large increase in the cost of educating each pupil as conx- 
pared with that of thirty years ago. 

Many are inclined to cavil at the increased expendi- 
tures and at the same time assert that the results now 
obtained by the schools are not commensurate with their 
greater cost. Whether the schools furnish more or less 
in proportion to the amount expended upon them than in 
a former generation is a most difficult thing to prove. 
The question furnishes a social problem that would require 
an immense amount of research before any just conclu- 
sions could be drawn. I doubt if it is possible at present 
to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion ; that will be the 
province of future historians. 

But it is safe to say that at no period of their existence 
have the schools of this country had more or a higher 
order of intelligence applied to their administration. Nor 
has there ever been a time in their history when they have 
been watched more closely by their critics. That they con- 
lain elements of weakness, their friends do not deny ; but 
that they are accomplishing a useful and a noble work, 
they also claim. Their friends also feel that they are 
giving a grand return to the country for the amount 
expended upon them, even if it is greatly in excess of 
what was spent upon them per capita a generation ago. 
They will cost more in the future, rather than less, because 
they are yet to project their lines of development to meet 
the conditions of life of the age, which has not yet 
reached its highest extension. The demands of the 
schools will be met by the people with the same spirit in 
the future as in the past, and it will be the care of these 
their guardians, that they continue to furnish that for which 
they were organized. 



40 SCHOOL REPORT. 

The year just closed has been productive of some 
important changes and improvements in our schools, and a 
review of the whole field of work is quite satisfactory. 
This, too, notwithstanding the fact that there was an 
unusual amount of absence by pupils in the late spring 
and early summer on account of the prevalence of dan- 
gerous epidemic diseases, and that the schools were closed 
two weeks earlier than usual for the same cause. 

The improvements that have been made or begun are 
on several different lines : Two school buildings are 
being enlarged, and a beautiful new building is being 
erected on Pleasant street, which is to accommodate the 
primary pupils now housed in the William Street school 
house, and is to furnish quarters for a cooking school and 
school in wood-working. The sanitaries in two of the 
large grammar school houses have been replaced by mod- 
ern and most excellent systems, which are very effective 
in operation. The department of drawing has received a 
new impulse and the good results are already being felt ; 
while some changes have been instituted in the course of 
study which will bring the instruction more in line with 
modern ideas. There are also other changes under con- 
sideration, which, if carried into effect, it is hoped and 
expected will prove a substantial benefit to the schools. 

That which is the crying need, not only of our schools 
but of all others, is a sufficient supply of teachers possess- 
ing the knowledge to instruct intelligently in the many 
branches now required to be taught, — teachers imbued 
with the true teaching spirit, who are neither time-servers 
nor pedants ; teachers who see in their pupils subjects for 
study and who realize that the duty of the teacher lies 
not simply in instilling facts into untutored minds, but in 
developing their pupils mentally, morally, and physically, 
in such a manner that in the future the powers with which 
these pupils were endowed may approximate at least tlie 
inherent possibilities of their natures. 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 4I 

ENROLLMENT AND ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS. 

The reports for the year show a continued and large 
growth in the public schools, confined almost entirely, 
however, to the primary grades. An abnormal growth 
is reported also by the parochial schools. The main sta- 
tistics of attendance in all the schools of the city for the 
past two years are given for the purpose of comparison : 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 





1892. 


1891. 


Gain. 


Enrollment, 


6,713 


6,383 


330 


Averaj^e number belonging, 


5,379 


5,024 


355 


Average daily attendance, 


4,822 


4,521 


.301 


Per cent, of attendance, 


90 


89.0 


.4 


PRIVATE AND 


PAROCHIAL 


SCHOOLS. 






1892. 


1891. 


Gain. 


Enrollment, 


3,248 


2,302 


946 


Average number belonging, 


2,821 


2,017 


804 


Average daily attendance. 


2.430 


1,855 


575 


Per cent, of attendance. 


8G 


92 


Loss, 6 


PUBLIC, PKIVATE, 


AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. 




1802. 


1891. 


Gain. 


Enrollment, 


9,961 


8,685 


1,276 


Average number belonging, 


8,200 


7,041 


1,159 


Average daily attendance. 


7,252 


6,376 


876 


Per cent, of attendance. 


88 


90.8 


Loss, 2.8 



These statistics have been compiled from the returns 
noade to me by the teachers of the private, parochial, and 
public schools. The reports from the public schools I 
know are substantially correct. While I believe that those 
from the other schools are intended to be correct, I am 
satisfied from the census returns of children of school age 
in the city that there is no such number of different pupils 
in attendance upon the schools of the city as reported. 



42 superintendent's report. 

Undoubtedly many pupils are reported twice, as many are 
constantly shifting back and forth between the parochial 
and the public schools. 

The census officers reported 8,605 children between the 
ages of five and fifteen years as residing in the city last 
May. Of this number 5, 163. were reported as attending 
the public schools, 2,300 as attending private and paro- 
chial schools, and 1,142 as attending no school. Those 
who are reported as attending no school are children 
between five and eight years of age who are not compelled 
by law to attend school, and those between fourteen and fif- 
teen who are at work. The reports from the schools would 
indicate that nearly all the pupils reported by the census 
officers as not attending any school had been absorbed in 
the schools. This would be contrary to all precedent, and 
I cannot believe it to be the case. 

The schools reporting the greatest gains are the two 
French parochial schools, the Sacred Heart and the St. 
Hyacinthe. The first reports an average number of 1,285 
pupils belonging and a gain of 515 pupils; the second 
reports an average of 272 pupils belonging, a gain of 157. 
The St. Hyacinthe school has never been approved by the 
School Committee. 

The public schools, while making large gains, did not 
make so great a gain as the year before by sixty pupils. 
This, however, was to be expected, as the census officers 
did not report so great a gain of pupils between the ages 
of five and fifteen this year as last by 344 children. The 
per cent, of daily attendance was a fraction less than the 
year before. It is not satisfactory. The cases of tardi- 
ness by pupils were somewhat less, but the dismissals were 
many more. There are by far too many of both for the 
i£ood of the schools. 

The cases of absence by teachers were doubled and the 
cases of tardiness were almost doubled. The causes of 



superintendent's report. 43 

absences of teachers may be classed under three heads : 
IFirst, personal sickness ; second, sickness in family and per- 
sonal demands ; third, leave of absence for purposes of im- 
provement by travel or study. The large increase the 
past year was due chiefly to the last cause. The number 
of cases of tardiness by teachers is altogether too largre and, 
I am sure, in many cases could have been avoided and 
should have been, for the sake of example to pupils, if for 
no other reason. 

A detailed statement of attendance and other items of 
interest are given by schools in a table preceding the 
Report of the Superintendent. 

TRUANCY. 

The number of cases of truancy reported by the 
teachers is 197 for the year, or six more than last year. 
The truant officer reports but eighty-four cases investigated 
that he classifies as truancy. I can account for this dis- 
crepancy in the reports in one way only, that in many 
cases of truancy the truant returns to school before the 
case is investigated by the truant officer, and therefore 
does not appear on his list. 

Truancy of course is chiefly confined to a class of pupils 
who have little or no home control or guidance. Where 
the out-of-school life of a truant is investigated by the 
officer or teacher, it is usually discovered that he is upon 
the street late and early, and that his habits are vicious in 
many respects. The unchecked truant usually becomes a 
Criminal, for that within him which leads him to defy the 
school authorities is very apt to cause him to break the 
Criminal statutes. 

There have been seven commitments during the year, 
a.nd there are at present in the Union Truant school 
thirteen truants from this city. One disobedient girl was 



44 superintendent's report. 

sentenced to the State Primary school. The reports of 
the truant officers give in detail their work for the year. 

TRUANT OFFICER'S REPORT. 

Schools visited, 1,297 

Absences reported by teachers, 724 

Absences without permission of parents, 84 

Second oflfences, 30 

Third offences, 19 

Parents notified, 805 

Arrests, 12 

Prosecutions, 12 

On probation, 1 

Sentenced to Truant school, 6 

Sentenced to State Primary school, 1 

Taken to school from street, 21 

Visits to mills, 65 

Violations of labor law, 21 

IIENRV SMITH, Truant Officer. 



ASSISTANT TRUANT OFFICER'S REPORT. 

Schools visitetl, 461 

Families visited, 27 

Cases of absences investigated from evening schools, 893 

Number visits to mills and mercantile establishments, 1,019 

Violations of labor law, 29 

OEORGE K. DAMMON, Assistant Truant Officer. 



COMPULSORY SCHOOL LAWS AND EMPLOY- 
MENT CERTIFICATES. 

The statutes that relate to school attendance and the 
employment of minors, in this State, are comprehensive 
and rigid. They are made for the purpose of reducing 
ignorance and illiteracy on the one hand, and, on the other, 
to secure to every child under fourteen years of age who 
resides within the borders of Massachusetts the advantages 
of a common school education. These statutes cause 



superintendent's report. 45 

sorr^c individual hardship, but are made in the general 

int^^ rests of the community. In manufacturing centres 

litci New Bedford the proper enforcement of these laws 

is difficult because there is a larger proportion of that class 

of people who try to avoid them than in other cities. 

Upon the School Committee and their executive officers 

restis the responsibility of enforcing these laws. If there 

were none except public schools, no trouble would be 

experienced in enforcing them. But with a large number 

of pupils in attendance upon private and parochial schools 

there is difficulty in enforcing them equably and justly. 

Without going into the details of this matter, it is suffi- 
cient for me to state here that, owing to the fact that only 
two of the private schools in the city have ever been 
approved by the School Committee, I am compelled to 
refuse certificates to pupils from those schools that are 
not approved when they desire to work. I am satisfied 
that certificates have been issued to some who under the 
law were not entitled to them. Again, as the matter now 
stands, the laws of attendance are enforced unequally, 
the pupils who attend the public schools being held 
strictly to account, while those attending other schools are 
not, for I have no means of ascertaining definitely whether 
pupils who attend the latter schools have complied with 
the laws or not. 

I respectfully submit these matters to the consideration 
of the School Committee with the hope that they will 
receive its early attention. 

I have treated the subject of employment laws and cer- 
^ficates quite fully in previous reports, giving the laws and 
explaining their operation. I do not propose to do so this 
year. That some idea may be given of the varied charac- 
terof our population and of the amount of time that is given 
^0 issuing these certificates, I give certain facts that are 
i'ileresting : 



46 superintendent's report. 



Number of certificates issued, 




For the first time, 


673 


Duplicates, 


25 


Birthplace of those to whom certificates were issued : 




United States, 


27« 


Canada, 


102 


England, 


85 


Portuguese colonies, 


78 


Germany, 


21 


Ireland, 


19 


Russia, 


13 


Scotland, 


10 


Prince Edward Islands, 


5 


France, 


3 


Wales, 


1 



Of those born in the United States nearly all wer 
foreign-born parentage. The parents of 213 of t 
children could not sign their own names. Many of 
children to whom certificates were issued could not : 
in English, and a number could neither read nor writ 
any language. Certificates are issued only to per 
under sixteen years of age and over fourteen, when 
have been to school thirty weeks since they were thirt 
provided they have resided in the city or town one y 
The following is the form of certificate that is issued, 
duplicate of each certificate issued is kept on file ir 
oflice. 

AGE AND SCHOOLING CERTIFICATE. 

Law of 1888. 

This Certifies, That I am the of 

and that was born at. in the couiitv of 

State of on the 

is now old. Signature, 

Date 181) . City of New Bedford, ] 

Then personally appeared before mo, the :il)ove named 

and made oath that the foregoing certitloa 
signed is true to the best of knowledge and belief. 
I here!>y Jipprove t\ut fon^going oortitieate of 



superintendent's report. 47 

height, complexion, hair, having 

no 8uftlcient reason to doubt that is of the age therein certified; 

(and I lieroby certify that can read at sight, and can write legibly 

simple sentences in the English language, and that has attended the 

public day school according to law for 
weeks during the year next preceding this date, and 
that the last thirty weeks of such attendance began) 
This certiticate expires 

Signature, 
Official authority, Supt. Schools. 

City of New Bedford, Mass. 
Date, 189 . 

An Act in relation to the Age and Schooling Certificates of Children em- 
ployed in Factories^ Workshops^ and Mercantile Establishments. 

Spx^tiox 1 . lliis certificate belongs to the person in whose behalf it 
has been drawn, and it shall be surrendered to him (or her) whenever 
he (or she) leaves the service of the corporation or employer holding 
the same ; and any such corporation or employer refusing to so deliver 
the same shall be punished by a fine of ten dollars. 

Section 2. Any corporation or employer holding any age or school- 
ing certificate, enumerated in section four of chapter three hundred and 
forty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred eighty-eight, and 
refusing to deliver the same to the person in whose behalf it has been 
drawn, when such person shall leave the employ of said corporation or 
employer, shall be punished by a fine of ten dollars. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The gain in the average number of pupils belonging in 
these schools for the year was 365. There were six 
teachers added to the primary corps of teachers in conse- 
quence of this increase. The average number of pupils 
to a teacher was forty-four. If a number of pupils had 
not been withdrawn from the Cedar Grove Street school 
in September a greater increase would have been shown. 
It has been necessary to house several classes in rented 
buildings while the Cedar Grove Street school house is 
being enlarged, and one more teacher has been employed 
than would have been required if proper school rooms 
had been available. 



48 superintendent's report. 

The most serious obstacle to progress in these schools is 
the great amount of absence and the numerous dismissals. 
No exertion on the part of the teachers seems to remedy 
these matters. It is not an unusual occurrence to have 
fifteen per cent, of the pupils absent from many rooms for 
whole months, and, at times, the percentage of absence is 
much greater. Many pupils are dismissed each day to 
carry dinners and to do other errands. Children who lose 
the most time are those who can least afford it. They 
have few home advantages and, as a rule, are not apt at 
learning. The majority of children who are dismissed 
regularly to carry dinners attend schools located in the 
mill districts. These constant interruptions and absences 
affect not only the pupils in question but the schools 
where these things prevail suffer as a whole. I have 
done all within my power to aid the teachers in checking 
these evils ; but some definite action of the Committee 
and the cooperation of the thoughtful parents of each dis- 
trict will be necessary before the desired results are 
accomplished. 

Discipline is made more difficult in these schools than 
in those of many places, because in many districts 
there is a heterogeneous population. Children are con- 
stantly entering who are much older than the pupils of 
the grade, and many, upon entering, speak little or no 
English. The difficulties of governing and teaching are 
both increased thereby. Yet, upon the whole, the pre- 
vailing spirit is most excellent. The teachers generally 
recognize that good progress is made only when the 
pupils in a great measure govern themselves and act 
from right motives. Harsh treatment should find no 
lodgment in any school, but, of all others, not in these 
grades. Neither should any pupil be punished until he is 
made aware of his fault and the teacher is reasonably 
sure that the punishment, of whatsoever nature, is 



superintendent's report. 49 

deserved, and will have the effect of benefiting the pupil. 
The majority of the teachers recognize the underlying 
principles of just government and practice them. But 
several, if they recognize them, fail in practice. They 
are either too lax in their discipline and thereby cause 
their pupils to acquire habits that in the future must either 
be eradicated or work them harm ; or, by harsh and mar- 
tinet methods, they repress in their pupils the spontaneity 
and enthusiasm which are natural to all healthy children, 
and which should be encouraged rather than suppressed ; 
or, again, they constantly nag their pupils, who obey per- 
haps for the instant, but soon repeat the same fault, to have 
the operation gone through with again. These are types 
of a few of the teachers (it gives me pleasure to say a 
very few) who are to be found in our primary schools, as 
well as in others, and the pupils who come under their 
tutelage are not to be envied. 

Few, if any, changes are to be noted in the course of 
study. The course in geography begun last year is prov- 
ing interesting and beneficial. The least satisfactory 
work is done in language, or, to be more explicit, that 
branch of it which relates to original expression, both 
spoken and written. Children easily acquire faulty habits 
of speaking ; in fact, when they have learned better forms 
of expression many of them seem to prefer the vernacular 
of the street. These bad habits of expression, together 
with the dearth of ideas that characterizes children and 
their limited vocabulary, are the diflScuUies with which 
teachers have to contend. By a constant correction of 
faulty forms of expression in all exercises, and in incul- 
cation of better forms, the teacher may remedy, in a great 
measure, the expression of her pupils. One reason why 
some teachers have so little success in this regard is 
their own lack of persistency in the matter. By interest- 
ing the children and stimulating their imagination by 

7 



50 superintendent's report. 

story, song, and illustration, thought will be awakened 
within their minds and they will seek words to express 
them. The task of the teacher then becomes easy, and 
progress is rapid. 

Some attempt has been made in a few schools to bring 
the children more into communion with nature by giving 
them observation lessons on animals, plants, and minerals. 
While nearly all the teachers are desirous of engaging in 
this line of work, they hesitate, because there is no definite 
course of study laid down in these subjects or because they 
have not confidence in their ability to teach them well. 
I hope to have a course prepared during the year for the 
teachers which will meet with the approval of the 
Committee. If, then, some such expert science teacher 
as Mr. Arthur Boyden can be employed to give the teach- 
ers some instructive and explanatory lessons on the course, 
it may be put into eflfective working. 

On the whole, the general work is commendable. The 
great majority of the teachers are earnest in purpose and 
strive, by study of the principles and methods of teaching, 
to acquaint themselves with the means by which they may 
best promote the welfare of their pupils. 

I still feel that an ungraded room opened in each of the 
larger primary buildings would be the means of pushing 
along more rapidly old and backward pupils, as well as 
forming an agency by which bright and ambitious pupils 
might be worked up for extra promotion. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Although there was an increase of several hundred 
pupils in the primary grades of the year, the grammar 
grades have made but a slight gain in attendance. By an 
error in classification last year, one grade primary which 
is housed in the Thompson Street school house was reck- 



superintendent's report. 51 

Toned with the grammar pupils. When this mistake is 
corrected, however, a small gain only is shown. As the 
laws of the State relating to school attendance require 
pupils to attend school longer than ever before (practi- 
cally until they are fourteen years old), I can account for 
no increase in the number of pupils in the grammar 
schools only by the supposition that the increase in school 
population in the city is of the class of children who are 
withdrawn at grammar school age to attend the parochial 
schools. The returns from those schools indicate this to 
be the fact. The average number of pupils to a teacher 
was forty-one. 

The organization of each of these schools allows the 
principal ample time for supervision, and herein lies his 
chief duty. Each teacher is responsible for her own 
room, but the principal is responsible for the whole 
school ; and by oral and written tests of the pupils from 
time to time, by personal observation of the methods of 
instruction and discipline, he should know intimately 
whether the work is of the right kind and whether it is 
harmonious throughout. The assistant teachers should 
be advised with as a body, by grades, and individually. 
Any teacher who fails, either from incompetency or 
unwillingness, to apply suggestions should be referred to 
higher authorities for their consideration. Failure to cor- 
rect faults should be followed by dismissal. If principals 
are not helpful to their assistants and permit poor teach- 
ing to go on in their buildings, they fail of their duty, and 
the schools will not accomplish what they might. 

But, as I have said, each teacher is directly responsible 
for her own room. It is her duty to acquaint herself with 
the principles of teaching and the best methods. She 
should seek assistance from the principal and give heed 
to his suggestions and criticisms. By acquaintance with 
^he work of grades above and below hers, she should do 



52 superintendent's report. 

her part to strengthen and unify the work throughout the 
whole school. Unless attention is given to these matters 
by teachers and principals, there is little hope of getting 
the very best results possible. 

It is reasonable to expect that there will be considerable 
variation shown by a large corps of teachers in their 
methods of teaching and governing. When any of these 
methods are really good, they should meet with approval. 
If they all are really good the results will not differ 
greatly. The methods of teaching and disciplining of 
many of the grammar teachers are good, of some, excel- 
lent. Those who are weak in these respects are all the 
more noticeable. It is no easy task to govern children of 
grammar school age without much friction, and a still 
harder task to create within them a desire for knowledge, 
as well as good habits of thinking and acting. If parents 
would more generally appreciate the fact that they owe to 
the children and the schools their thoughtful consideration, 
and would give their hearty support to the teachers in 
their honest endeavors to do their duty, the atmosphere of 
school rooms would be pleasanter, and the results would 
be enhanced. 

The subjects most prominent at the present time before 
those to whom the control of the public schools is intrusted 
are : First, what subjects shall be included in the school 
curriculum ; second, how can the graded system be made 
more elastic and at the same time preserve its unity and 
not increase the cost of schools, which is already becom- 
ing burdensome. 

These are practical and vital questions and deserve the 
most careful consideration. The second of these questions 
has been the object of recent investigation by the New 
England Association of School Superintendents. A com- 
mittee was appointed to collect statistics of the age and 
attendance of pupils in grammar schools. Their report 



superintendent's report. 53 

I give in full, as it has a practical bearing not only on the 
general question but will be helpful in settling one phase 
of it, upon which I shall again ask the consideration of 
the School Board. 



NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL 

SUPERINTExNDENTS. 



Report of Committee on Statistics concerning Gram-- 
fttar School Graduates: 

Blank forms of inquiry were sent in accordance with 
the vote of the association to all parts of New England. 
Replies were received from 104 cities and towns. The 
returns are not in all cases complete. This occasions no 
surprise, for it is well known that many cities and towns 
have not sufficient data at the present time for answering 
all the questions. 

It was hoped, however, that more returns would be 
received even if a few statistics only were given, such as 
the number of graduates from the grammar schools and 
the average age of those graduates. 

The statement is made in some instances that complete 
returns could not be made but partial ones are sent cheer- 
fully. These partial returns aided the committee in the 
preparation of the report. 

The second item, viz., "Average age of pupils," is of 
special importance at this time when there is so much dis- 
cussion concerning the time that pupils spend in grammar 
schools. A statement with reference to this single item 
^^'ould have been acceptable. Statistics relating to items 
^ ^^ 12 inclusive are not given upon a large number of the 
'"t^iurris. The reasons for this omission are obvious. 



54 superintendent's report. 

Very few places have had any systematic plan of keeping 
the registers so that such information could be obtained 
readily. Teachers are doing it now to a considerable 
extent and there is no doubt that in a few years a principal 
of a grammar school in one of our large cities will be able 
to furnish all the information that is desired by those who 
issue a circular similar to the one prepared in accordance 
with the vote of this association. 

Some superintendents were not able to report separately 
the number, on the one hand, whose attendance had been 
confined to the place from which the reports are made, 
and, on the other hand, the number who had been in school 
elsewhere a part of the time. Many of the superintendents 
call attention to this point. It was not expected by your 
committee that all returns could be complete in this 
respect. Your committee, having thus indicated some of 
the reasons that would account for many incomplete returns, 
must express regret that more partial returns were not 
made. 

A general division may be made at first as follows: 

1. Cities and larger towns having full graded courses. 

2. Smaller towns with partial courses. This classifica- 
tion is arbitrary and not very exact. Statistics from these 
places are as follows : 

Cities and Lar<;er Towns. Smaller Towns. 

Average age, 15 years, 1 month. 14 years, 3 moutlis. 

Over 16, 22 per cent. 8 per cent. 

Under 14, 15 per cent. 37 per cent. 

Length op Courses. 
61 places, 9 years' course. 

5 '' 10 '' '' 

1 town, 7 '' " 

The cities and large towns report generally a nine 



superintendent's report. 55 

years' course. Complete returns from thirty-eight cities 
and towns with nine years' course, seventeen with eight 
years' course, and one with ten years' course are given as 
follows : 

1. Places having nine years' course. 



No. of graduates, 1,950. 

Average age, 15 years, 2 months. 

Over 16, 18 per cent. 

Under 14, 15 " " 

Completing the course in 6 years or less, 3 " 

in 7 " 6 






in 8 ** 19 " 

in 9 " 35 " 






in 10 " 27 " *' 

Uequiring more than 10 " 10 *' " 



o 


Places having eight years' course. 




No. of graduates, 402. 




Average age, 14 years, 3i 




Over 16, 6 per cent. 




Under 14, 30 " " 




(.'ompletiug the course in 6 years or less, 1 *' " 




in 7 u 9 u u 




in 8 " 37 " '' 




in 9 " 30 " '' 




In 10 " 17 '' " 




T^Aniiii>in<if mrkro f.lian 1(\ ^^ f\ ^^ (( 



^^ c^ity with ten years' course. 



o. of graduates, 29. 

Average age, 15 years, 2 months, 

over 16, 2 under 14. 

oropletiDg the course in 7 years, 3 per cent. 

in 8 '* 28 '' *' 

in 9 " 38 '' '' 

in 10 " 25 *' ** 

-{equiring more than 10 ^^ 6 



ki (i 



56 superintendent's report. 

These figures, it must be understood, are approximate 
only. Many of these pupils were away from school for 
various reasons, — some for a term, others for one or more 
years. The statistics, however, are of value. They 
show that there is more elasticity to the courses of study 
than we should be led to believe from some of the criti- 
cisms made concerning the management of the schools. 

The figures indicate the time the pupils were first regis- 
tered in a primary school. It may be said, also, in partial 
explanation of the higher average age of the graduates of 
the nine years' courses, that these reports are received from 
the larger places. 

Some of the smaller towns, it is stated in the returns, 
have a five years' course in the high school, and, in fact, in 
many of the smaller places the studies of the first year of 
the high school course correspond to those of the last year 
in the grammar schools of the larger places. The differ- 
ence in the average age of the graduates in these two 
classes of cities and towns is therefore more apparent 
than real. 

Boston reports the average age of the graduates, lo 
years,') months. Cambridge reports the number of years 
the pupils were in the grammar schools, the course in this 
grade being six years. The returns from Cambridge are 
as follows : 



No. of graduates, 536. 




Average age, 


15 years, 4-5 mouths. 


Over 16, 


123. 


Umier 14, 


107. 


Oldest graduate, 


18 years, H mouths. 


Youngest *' 


11 " 10 ** 


Coniplct ing grainuiHr school course in 4 years, 


54. 


in 5*^ '' 


146. 


in 6 '' 


289. 


in 7 '* 


92. 


Requiring more than 7 ** 


0. 



superintendent's report. 57 

Sixty-two places report separately the number of 
pupils who never attended elsewhere and the number that 
have had a partial course only in the city or town from 
which the report was received. The partial-course pupils 
average older than the whole-course pupils in forty-two 
places and slightly younger in the others. Eighty per 
cent, of the whole number of partial-course pupils were 
reported from the forty-two places mentioned. 

The items relating to age are worthy of study. It may 
be well to call attention to individual places. Some people 
are surprised to learn that there are so many pupils in the 
grammar schools 16, 17, and 18 years of age. The age 
of pupils is not the only thing to be considered. The 
work that is assigned them is of more consequence. 
There is food for thought in the memorable words of Mil- 
ton, ''I care not how late I come into life only that I come 
fit." 

If the pupils 16 years of age are kept at work term after 
term upon those subjects that are prescribed for the aver- 
age pupil 10 years of age, there is cause for complaint. 
We are dealing at this time, however, with figures, more 
than with inferences. The facts relating to the age of 
pupils in the grammar schools, however, may have an 
important bearing in the consideration of the subject of a 
course of study for grammar schools. 

The average age of those entering is reported from one 
city, 6 years, 2 months. 

The oldest pupil is reported from Lawrence, 20 years, 1 
month; the next oldest at Rutland, Vt., 20 years; the 
youngest, 10 years, at Plymouth, Mass. The oldest pupil 
in twenty-four of the 103 places reporting is 18. 

The average age in one city is 15 years, 4 months. 
The superintendent in explanation says: "The average 
age is raised by a few considerably older than the aver- 

8 



58 superintendent's report. 

age ; these are boys who have had few advantages and 
have pluck enough to go to a grammar school.'* 

Returns were received from six places from each gram- 
mar school separately. The degree of uniformity in the 
average age of pupils at the various grammar schools in 
some cities is noticeable, while in other places there is a 
wide variation. The greatest range of ages found in any 
city is seven years, two months. The range in several 
other places is six years, while five years is very common. 
Milton, on the other hand, reported the oldest graduate 
15 years, 4 months, the youngest 18 years, 4 months. 

The returns from the schools of Q^iincy — on account of 
the degree of uniformity in the item of average age — are 
presented herewith separately : 

AVKKAOE A(;e. 
School No. 1 14 years, months. 

a ifc 2 14 *' T) '* 

u u 4 14 *' 8 ' '' 

.i I. 5 14 ii ,) u 



a kk 



(> 14 *' 



Somerville reports 380 graduates, 112 of whom are over 
1(> and 8.'} under 14 — the oldest, IS years, 4 months; the 
youngest, 12 years, 11 months. 

wSpringficld reports 181 graduates, 67 over 16 and 9 
under 14 — the oldest, 18 years, 4 months ; the youngest, 12 
years, S months. 

Local causes may account for the diversity in the "aver- 
age age'' at different schools and for this reason it might 
be well to ask for a report from the individual schools. 
The policy adopted by different principals may account, in 
part at least, for the difference in the ages at the separate 
schools. It is claimed that in some schools the pupils 16, 
17, 18 years of age are crowded out of the grammar 
schools in some wa^^ before they can reach the ninth year. 



superintendent's report. 59 

while in other schools an earnest effort is made to retain 
these older pupils in school as long as possible. Your 
committee can call attention simply to these subjects. 
Others must investigate. Interesting themes for study 
present themselves. It might be well for us to gather 
statistics concerning the number of older pupils in the 
lower classes of the grammar schools, to ascertain whether 
there are many in the sixth and seventh grades that are 
old enough to be in the high school ; whether these pupils, 
becoming discouraged at the thought that they can never 
complete the grammar school course, drop out of school 
quietly. 

If one is disturbed on account of the high average age 
of the grammar school graduates, he might be still more 
disturbed to know that in some of the lower classes the 
average age is relatively higher. That would not of 
necessity disturb others, for the question of age would not 
be considered so much by them as the kind of work these 
pupils are doing. 

It was asserted at the last meeting that the number of 
years prescribed for the course does not determine the 
time the pupil remains in school ; that he will be a certain 
length of time in school whether the course is seven, eight, 
nine, or ten years. The figures presented seem to justify 
this assertion. 

Your committee presents the statistics at this time. 
Each superintendent must draw his inferences. 

This report is imperfect, the returns are necessarily 
incomplete, but a beginning has been made. Other statis- 
tics may be collected that will aid us all in our labors. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 
GEORGE H. MARTIN, 

Committee. 
November 12, 189g. 



6o superintendent's report. 

The report from New Bedford is as follows : 

NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Statistics of age and attendance for the city of Nev: 
Bedford: 

In order to insure uniformity in tabulating ages, Sep- 
tember 1, 1892, is named as the date at which the age of 
each and every pupil is reported. The present term of 
school opened in most places early in September. The 
report should include all pupils that have been enrolled 
during the present term. 

STATISTICS. 

Highest Clans of Lowcf^t Clai«»of 
Grammar i^chool. High Srhool. 

1. Number of pupils, 221 140 

2. Averajje age of pupilst, y<*ar8 aud months, 14.7 1.5.1 
.'J. Age of oldest pupil, years aud mouths, 17.2 18.5 ^ 

4. Age of youngest pupil, years and months. 11.10 l;{.2 

5. Number under 12, 1 
(). Nuinbtn* 12 years of age, 10 

7. Number 13 ye^irs of age, 71 11 

S. Number 14 years of age. 05 52 

9. Number 15 years of age, 50 54 

10. Number 10 years of age, 17 17 

11. Number 17 years of age, 1 4 

12. Xum!)er 18 years of age, 

13. Number over 18 years, 2 

14. Number who are members of the class 

for the second year, 10 «» 

15. Number who are members of the class 

for the third year, 

10. Number of graduates from grammar school, 1802, 150 

17. Number reported in item 10 entering the High 

school the present term, 116 

IS. Average age of pupils entc»ring primary school, 

September, 1SJ)2, years, 4 months. 



superintendent's report. 6i 

It is shown by the report that there is not a dull uni- 
forraity of progression throughout the schools in New 
England. Many pupils complete the prescribed courses 
in less than the appointed time, while others, for various 
caxases, take longer. I shall not attempt to analyze the 
causes why so many fail to complete the course in the 
apportioned time when the course of studies represents the 
minimum amount to be done by the average pupil, rather 
than the maximum. It is sufficient to say that it is known 
to every one at all familiar with the working of the 
schools that the fault cannot with justice be attributed 
w'holly to the defects in the schools themselves. 

So far as the schools of our city are concerned, how- 
ever, I feel that sufficient opportunity is not given the 
brighter pupils to advance out of course. This matter I 
called to the attention of the Committee several years ago, 
and I again recommend that it receive its early attention. 
Promotions out of course should be made advisedly, and 
with due regard to the physical condition, as well as the 
tnental acquirements, of the pupils. Parents must be as 
willing also to abide by the decisions of the school authori- 
ties in these cases as they are to conform to the other 
reasonable regulations of the schools, if the practical 
operation of such promotions is to prove most beneficial 
to the individuals concerned and the schools at large. 

I wish to call attention here to the average age of the 
pupils in this city when they enter the lowest primary 
grade. It is six years, four months, or higher than that 
of any other city reporting. This is caused by the large 
'iumber of foreign children who enter at an advanced age 
^nd cannot speak or read in English. This condition of 
affairs in the primary grades would raise still higher the 
grammar age if many such children continued their 
courses into the grammar schools. 



62 superintendent's report. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

Country Schools. — A slight increase is shown in the 
attendance at these schools. Seven teachers are employed 
in them and the average number of pupils is twenty-nine 
to a teacher. The Plainville school averages less than 
the others. Owing to the number in the North school, an 
additional room was built on that school, but I am inclined 
to think that the number of pupils who will attend there 
regularly will not warrant the constant employment of an 
assistant teacher. A new teacher was placed in charge of 
the Rockdale school at the beginning of the year, the one 
who had temporarily filled the position having been trans- 
ferred to a graded school. A plan is now in successful 
operation in several towns in the State by which pupils in 
the outlying districts are conveyed ^ach day to graded 
schools in the centres. The result is a saving in actual 
expenditure and the pupils have better advantages. It is 
said^that while opposition is encountered at first from the 
residents of the outlying districts, trial proves to them the 
wisdom of the plan, and their approbation is soon gained. 
I think the plan could be applied here with substantial 
benefit to the schools and some saving in cost of mainte- 
nance to the city. 

Mill Schools. — The attendance in these schools has 
been affected by the change in the school laws. In fact, 
many who attended these might as well attend the graded 
schools. The establishment of ungraded rooms in sev- 
eral of our primary and grammar grades would provide 
for these pupils as well as they are now provided for, and 
at the same time would furnish schools wherein back- 
ward pupils from different graded rooms might be tempo- 
rarily placed for special work. Even some of the 
ambitious and brighter pupils who wished to do special 



superintendent's report. 63 

work for extra promotion, might find in such rooms an 
opportunity to do advanced work. As long as the name 
Mill school is applied to them, and they have a separate 
organization, just so long will all but pupils who are to 
work in the mills decline to attend them. The present 
teachers are well qualified to take up this broader work 
that I have suggested. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Elementary Schools. — The power is wholly with the 
School Committee to determine the number of evening 
schools that shall be maintained in a city or town, the 
number and length of the terms, and all details that per- 
tain to them. The cost of maintaining them for any 
length of time in this city, since the law was passed 
requiring the attendance of all illiterate minors, and the 
difficulty in securing a sufficient number of teachers to 
conduct them, has given these schools an importance in 
the past few years that they did not have before. 

While it is well that illiterate minors and others who 
did not have the opportunity to acquire the rudiments of 
an education in their younger days may do so through the 
maintenance of evening schools, it can be readily seen 
that in providing such instruction the cities and towns of 
Massachusetts are attempting to supply the deficiencies of 
other states and countries that fail to give their citizens 
the education they should. It is also evident that the bur- 
den of evening schools will fall heaviest on cities like 
New Bedford, where the mills attract large numbers of 
the illiterate class. And while, as I have said, it is well 
to maintain these schools, they should not be maintained 
at the expense of the day schools. Therefore, it seems to 
™c that it would be wise that the evening schools be 
"maintained from a separate appropriation, and the will of 



64 superintendent's report. 

our citizens can be manifested through the city govern- 
ment as to the amount they wish expended on them. 

The sessions of the schools have been three nights each 
week for twenty weeks, the same as the year before. 
There were 2,192 pupils enrolled, with an average number 
belonging of 971, and a nightly attendance of 703. It has 
required forty-nine teachers to teach them. It was impos- 
sible to secure enough teachers from those on the approved 
list who were willing to do evening school work, and a 
number of teachers were placed temporarily in the schools 
chosen from candidates who offered themselves. All of 
them are or had been successful teachers. They have in 
nearly every instance given good satisfaction. 

The cost of these schools for the year was $5,951.08, 
or an average cost per pupil of $6.12. This is relatively 
much higher than the cost of a day pupil, as one-third as 
much is paid for 120 hours' schooling in the evening 
schools as is paid for 1,000 hours in the day schools. The 
relative cost is increased by the necessity of employing 
twice as many teachers in evening schools as are 
employed for the same number of pupils in the day 
schools. A teacher in an evening school cannot instruct 
to advantage more than twenty pupils. 

The effectiveness of evening schools is seriously dimin- 
ished by the irregular attendance, especially of the illiter- 
ate class. Many of them go from necessity and have 
no interest. There is also a large floating attendance. 
These facts are shown by the nightly attendance, which is 
only about one-third of the enrollment. 

To those persons who earnestly desire an opportunity to 
get an elementary education, it should be given. And if 
any number of such persons desire to attend evening 
schools three or four nights a week, let schools be provided 
that many nights per week. Make the stipulation with 
them upon entering, however, that they must be able at 



superintendent's report. 65 

least to read in the second reader to be accepted candi- 
dates, and must agree to attend regularly enough to make 
the schools effective. 

For the illiterate class, have the schools kept two nights 
only. The effect of such a plan would be to put to the 
proof the earnestness of those who claim that they desire 
the privilege of three or four nights' schooling a week. 
It would also stimulate those of the illiterate class who 
really desire better advantages to make themselves eligible 
for the advanced classes. I am of the opinion, also, that 
the two nights a week would be fully as effective as three 
for the greater part of the illiterate pupils, as they would 
be more willing to attend regularly for the shorter lime. 
The plan would certainly decrease the expense of those 
schools and at the same time would give those who 
desire the rudiments of an education an opportunity to 
acquire it. 

Evening Drawing School. — This school offers excel- 
lent advantages to those desiring to acquire a knowledge 
of the principles of drawing and skill in its application 
to their daily vocations. The attendance upon it is not 
what it should be in a city of this size, the chief industries 
of which are manufacturing. Indeed, the attendance is 
not much larger, if any, than when the city was half the 
size it is at present ; neither does it compare favorably in 
this respect with similar schools in other places. 

The school is excellently equipped for doing good work, 
both in the quality of its instructors and in its appliances. 
Instruction is given in both elementary and advanced 
work, in several different courses, from which those who 
attend may choose, the only requirement being that pupils 
shall qualify themselves by sufficient elementary work to 
take up intelligently the advanced. 

Much good is accomplished by the school, however, as 

9 



66 superintendent's report. 

many of its graduates will testify. They are filling 
positions of usefulness and responsibility gained by their 
knowledge of drawing, the foundation of which was laid 
in this school. Although the expense is comparatively 
large, the Committee is justified in maintaining it with 
even the present attendance. 

MUSIC, DRAWING, AND SEWING. 

While I have nont? other than words of commendation 
for the thorough, careful, and painstaking work of the 
director of music in our schools, I can but feel that too 
great emphasis is being given to teaching the mechanics 
of music. The result must be to make good readers of 
music, but mechanical singers ; it will turn out those who 
are skilled in the principles of the subject, but devoid of 
that which gives it life and soul. To attune the ears of 
the children to melody, to develop within them a love for 
music, to stir into life their better and loftier sentiments, 
and to soften and mellow their natures by the constant 
singing of beautiful songs, appears to me to be the chief 
object of having music taught in the schools. Knowledge 
of the principles certainly must be taught, but not so 
emphasized that the main object fails to be compassed. 

Drawing in our schools the past few years has been 
rapidly brought into line with the best educational thought 
of the day as to the proper place it should occupy in the 
common school curriculum. The course is now harmoni- 
ous and progressive, and the regular teachers are better 
qualified as a whole to give intelligent instruction in this 
branch than ever before. The present supervisor, a grad- 
uate of the Pratt Institute, and a successful teacher before 
entering that school, is giving the kind of administration 
which will round it out and efl^ace the deficiencies which 
have hitherto characterized it. 



superintendent's report. 67 

The sewing department has been conducted by the same 
teachers and in the same general manner as in other years. 
This branch of manual instruction is deserving of the place 
that it occupies in our schools. The materials from which 
the articles are made are furnished by the parents of the 
pupils, and, in most cases, willingly. When a pupil fails 
to bring work the teacher furnishes it. Most of the uten- 
sils used in the work are now supplied by the city. The 
ehief improvements that are needed to strengthen the 
work are these : 

1. More of the application of the principles of teach- 
ing that rule in presenting other branches. 

2. Conducting the recitations in such a way that there 
shall be less waste of time. The regular teachers share 
the responsibility in the last regard and fail in some cases 
to do their whole duty. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

There has been a slight increase in the attendance for 
the year. The average number of pupils belonging for 
1891 was 358 ; for 1892 the number was 368, a gain of 
fifteen. The percentage of pupils enrolled in the public 
schools, who avail themselves of the High school privi- 
leges here, is about the same as in other cities in thef State 
where the character of the population is similar. The 
influence of parochial schools, of course, is felt in the 
attendance at the High school as well as in the elemen- 
tary schools, few, if any, candidates for the High school 
being presented by the parochial schools. From fifty 
to sixty per cent, of all the pupils entering the school 
leave before graduating. The causes are various : Some 
leave for pecuniary reasons ; some, because they do not 
care to do the required v/ork ; some, on account of ill 
health. I think the pupils are held as long in the school 
now as at any period of its history. 



68 superintendent's report. 

There is a feeling that prevails to a certain extent that 
high schools should not be maintained at the public 
expense ; that the State has done its duty when it main- 
tains elementary schools and gives such an education to 
its children as is therein afforded. This feeling finds pub- 
lic expression occasionally, but is usually confined to 
private criticism, for such an opinion is not a popular one, 
especially here in New England. High schools are 
expensive. They take a large proportion of the school 
money to maintain them ; but they are worth all they cost, 
in any democratic republic, if they are efficient. Criticism 
should be directed to their lack of efficiency rather than to 
the right or the need of maintaining them. In fact, the 
latter questions have been argued out quite effectively in 
the past. That high schools fail to accomplish what they 
should furnishes good ground for debate. They undoubt- 
edly need to be improved, as well as the elementary 
schools. 

There is a great cry all along the line for trained teach- 
ers in the elementary schools ; the great weakness of these 
schools is without question due to the scarcity of such 
teachers ; but this is in a measure true of high schools. 
Unquestionably the great majority of teachers in high 
schooks are well educated, and many have professional 
skill ; but with a great many also the latter quality is 
wanting. It is true that instruction in high schools has 
improved within a few years, but it is a well acknowledged 
fact that there has been less improvement in professional 
training of high school teachers than of elementary 
teachers. In fact, many of them think they need no 
improvement, and consider any suggestion as unwar- 
ranted interference. A few years ago, there was a strong 
movement, in this State at least, and I do not know but it 
might be said to have extended over New England, to 
found professional training schools for high school teach- 



superintendent's report. 69 

ers ; but, unfortunately, the movement so far has not taken 
substance, unless the founding of chairs of pedagogy in 
several colleges may be so considered. Not until the 
broader professional training for high school teachers, as 
Well as others, is demanded, and appointments are made 
/or merit alone, will high schools do for the children all 
they should. 
To bring the High school into line with the policy pur- 
sued in the lower schools in regard to promotions, the 
rtigh School Committee adopted at the beginning of the 
prtesent school year the following regulations for deter- 
nn i ning the class standing of pupils and their promotion : 

Section /. Class Standing of Pupils, 

1. The class standing of the pupils in the High school 
J'l^all be fixed on the results of five written examinations 
given by the various class teachers each year to their 
piapils. 

S. These examinations shall be given under the direc- 
tion and general supervision of the principal of the school, 
>^bose duty it shall be to determine when and how such 
examinations shall be given. 

Section II. Promotions, 

1. Promotions of pupils from class to class shall not be 
governed by any fixed system of marks, obtained either by 
pupils on their daily recitations or by marks obtained from 
the five examinations mentioned in Section I. of these 
regulations. 

^- But promotions of pupils shall be made from class 
to class by the principal of the school, who shall deter- 
^^i^e the fitness of each pupil for promotion from the 
recommendations of the class teachers and his own knowl- 
^^ge of each pupil's work and capability. 



'o 



70 SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 

3. Within one week after the close of the school -year, 
the principal of the school shall send to the High School 
Committee, through its Secretary, the names of those 
pupils who have not been promoted, with the reasons 
therefor. He shall also forward to the High School Com- 
mittee, at the same time, the average per cent, obtained 
by each of the rejected pupils in the five examinations 
mentioned in Section I. of these regulations. A pupil not 
recommended by the principal of the school for promotion 
shall not be advanced except by a majority vote of the 
High School Committee. 

By the adoption of these regulations the teachers were 
freed from the daily rank book, hampered with which no 
teacher can teach as well as he can without it. No longer 
is the energy of the teacher to be spent in recording per 
cents, for an object which can just as well be deter- 
mined without any such machinery. At the same time, 
there is no reason whatever why the efficiency of the 
school should be impaired because pupils are called upon 
to work for right motives. The percentage of the pupils 
who failed of advancement each year, under the marking 
system, was small, and the teachers can determine this 
percentage closely enough to do justice to each pupil and 
maintain the efficiency of the school without any such 
cumbersome system. 

This opinion is in accord with that of a great number of 
the broadest-minded educators in the country ; many cities 
have already abolished the system of basing promotions 
on daily markings or examinations, and others are ripe for 
the change. The statistics given below relate especially to 
pupils who graduated from the school in 1892, who are 
pursuing advanced courses in the school or elsewhere, and 
the intentions of those in the school in regard to advanced 
courses. These statistics, and the records of previous 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 7 1 

years, show that the proportion of those who go to college 
from our High school is smaller than the proportion in the 
majority of first class high schools in New England. 
They also show that while many elect the college course 
upon entering, few continue the course even through the 
school. This condition, it seems to me, calls for serious 
consideration on the part of the Committee, and it should 
be determined whether the fault is in the school or outside 
of it. 

NEW^ BEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL. 
Recent Pupils upon Advanced Courses. 



(■raduateft of 1892, pursuing advauceii courses: 










Glrl8. 


Boys. 


Total. 


College, 




3 


3 


Medical school. 


1 


2 


3 : 


Swain school, 


1 


5 


6 


Harrington Training school, 


2 




2 


Po8t-gra<iuate work in High school, 


8 


1 


9 


Business college, 


4 




4 



Totals. 16 11 27 

Post-gniduates in the High school during 1892, now pursuing tuivanced 
courses : 

< College, 
Medical school, 
Harrington school, 

Totals, 

Entering Pupils. 

Pupils entering High school, September, 1892 : 

From New Bedford public schools. 
From other schools, 





1 


1 




3 


3 


2 




2 


2 


4 


G 



Po«t-graduat«8 in the High school, 1892: 

•Fanuary to .Fune, 
September to December, 

Totals, 10 8 18 



73 


55 


128 


1 


3 


4 


74 


58 


132 


2 





7 


S 


3 


11 



72 



superintendent's report. 



Intentions Concerning Advanced Courses. 

Classical course (to enter college with Greek) : 

Class I., 
II., 
III., 
IV., 






Totals, 

To enter college without Greek : 

Class I., 
- II., 

Totals, 



2 

8 

22 

32 



1 
1 



1 


1 


6 


8 


7 


1.-) 


5 


:{7 



27 



4 
1 



Gl 



2 



G 



To enter scientiftc school : 

Post-graduate, 
Class I., 

'' ir.. 

Totals, 



1 
G 
2 

9 



1 
G 



To enter medical school 

Class I., 
'' II., 

Totals, 



3 
3 

6 



3 
3 

6 



To enter law school : 

Post-graduate, 1 1 

In conclusion, I would say that the High school requires 
the most intelligent and thorough supervision, if its work 
is to be most effective. With the system of departmental 
instruction that prevails, supervision is even more neces- 
sary than in the class system, if the work is to be 
thoroughly coordinated. 

Again, the studies of the grammar schools should be 
more thoroughly supplemented by the work in the High 
school in the same lines. Much that has been eliminated 
from the grammar and arithmetic of the grammar course 



superintendent's report. 73 

oertainly has its legitimate place in the High school course. 
Knowledge of facts is not of so great importance to the 
High school graduate as mental power ; but mental power 
will not be possessed by one who has not a broad grasp of 
tacts. The modern system of schools gives opportunity. 
Let the graduate of the high schools show greater power 
to apply their knowledge to practical affairs, and there 
will be less criticism of these schools. 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. 

It has come to be a well accepted principle among edu- 
cators of this country that teachers should add profes- 
sional knowledge and professional training to a well stored 
mind if they are to perform most acceptably the responsi- 
ble and exacting duties of their vocation. This belief is 
shared b^' most Boards of Education in the progressive 
cities and towns, and is rapidly winning its way among the 
people at large, especially in the East and Northwest. In 
consequence. State normal schools have sprung up and 
multiplied ; and as they failed to answer the demand, city 
training schools have become an adjunct of the school 
systems of many of our leading cities. 

It should be said that the latter schools are in no wise 

intended to supplant the State normal schools, nor has 

this proved to be the case. Indeed, normal schools are 

more fully attended since these training schools were 

organized than before. They have been organized in 

those places where they exist because the actual facts were 

these : First, a sufficient number of persons who resided 

in those places did not avail themselves of the advantages 

of the normal schools to supply the demand there for 

teachers, and the result was that vacancies occurring were 

tilled with graduates of the high schools, who had no 

training whatever. That was true in a great measure of 

lO 



74 superintendent's report. 

New Bedford before the Training school was organized. 
The second reason was, that the graduates of most of the 
normal schools were given no opportunity to put into 
practice, under the supervision of skilled teachers, the 
theories which they had learned, and many of them, there- 
fore, proved inefficient when placed in charge of schools. 
Most normal schools now have practice schools connected 
with them. The third reason was the fact that the stand- 
ard of admission to the State normal schools was not 
high enough to debar from them those who had not had 
the advantages of a high school education even. This 
last objection holds good to-day. 

Training schools give a certain amount of normal 
instruction, and would gladly give more. They give more 
practice in teaching than most normal schools and special 
training in the details of the work in the school system 
of which they are a part. Their advocates recognize that 
the broader normal work given by the normal schools 
would be desirable, and would be pleased if all candidates 
for the training schools were graduates of normal schools. 
The city of Cambridge makes that one condition of 
entrance to its training school. The fact is, that it is diffi- 
cult here and in other places to get a sufficient num- 
ber of candidates to qualify themselves for admission 
and give a year and a half to work in the schools, although 
they are paid small salaries after serving a half year in 
school without pay, this first half year being given to 
normal work only. 

City training schools have their weaknesses, and none 
are more cognizant of their defects than those most deeply 
interested in them. One of these defects, I am ready to 
grant, is their inability, under their present form of organ- 
ization, to give the teachers that breadth of instruction that 
will in the future make them most thoughtful and inquir- 
ing in their mental habits. This deficiency cannot be 



superintendent's report. 75 

overcome without adding so much to the cost of the schools 
as to make their maintenance burdensome. Again, to 
replete the corps of teachers in any city from the gradu- 
ates of its training school only, will tend to narrowness 
and lifelessness in the schools. It is a kind of inbreeding 
which will be apt to work injury. I, for one, therefore, do 
not desire that our Training school furnish all the candi- 
dates for our corps of teachers. I do not look upon it as a 
calamity when the school falls short of candidates and the 
Committee is compelled to bring in some experienced 
teacher from elsewhere, although I can but wonder that 
there are not enough young ladies in this cily who are 
willing to give at least two years in special preparation for 
their life's work. When a substitute is provided for the 
Training school which will furnish a sufficient supply of 
teachers for the schools more thoroughly equipped for 
school room duties and responsibilities, then let the Train- 
ing school be abandoned, and not till then. In the mean- 
while, let it be made as thorough and effective as the 
resources of the city will admit. Belter that a few only 
graduate from it each year than that any policy shall be 
adopted that will put a premium on inefficiency. 

So far in the history of our school, the classes have 

varied in size, but that was expected when the school was 

organized, and provision was made in the regulations by 

which the pupils in the school should not suffer from scarcity 

of experienced teachers. The condition of the school has 

required extra assignments to it for part of the year, five 

graduates being now employed there. I recommend that 

a permanent critic teacher be attached to the school, that 

the principal and assistant principal may have more time 

for normal work and supervision. 

The school is answering all reasonable expectations, 
both in its special work of training the teachers and in 
caring for the interests of the children who are pupils 



76 superintendent's report. 

there. The latter, when they enter the grammar schools, 
are well qualified in every way to continue their course, 
and compare most favorably with the pupils who have 
been prepared in our best primary schools. 

The school is fortunate in having at its head a principal 
and an assistant principal who not only are thoroughly 
capable to conduct it, but who are indefatigable in their 
efforts for those intrusted to their charge. 

Below are the names of the graduates and the statistics 
of the school for the year : 

GRADUATES. 
February Class, 1892. 
Margaret FI. Holmes, Sara M. Hatch. 

Junk Class, 1892. 

Charlotte May Allen, Mary Luther HUlman, 

Lizzie Maria Briggs, Harriet Newton Hyatt, 

Harriet Love Cornell, Annie May King, 

Ethel Washburn Denhani, Ruth Emma Pease, 

Dora Amanda DeWolf, Julia Mason Pilling, 

Julia Croclter Gilford, Fannie Matthews Spooner. 

STATISTICS. 

Numl)er of pupil-teachers enrolled during the year, 33 

*' *^ •' graduated in February-, 2 

*^ '' ** graduated in June, 12 

'' *^ '' admitted in February, 9 

'' '' *' admitted in September, 4 

•' '* ^' in senior class, December, 1892, 2 

-' *' ** granted leave of absence, seniors, 1 

** " '' in junior class, December, 1 892, 10 

'* *• in sub-junior class, 3 

** '' '" resigned from sub-junior class, 2 

'* assistants, 5 

^* days of substituting by pupil-teachers, 230 

••* days' absence for other causes, 1454 

Total mimber of days' absence of pupil-teachers, 3754 

'' '' '* assistants, 94 

Average number of pupil-teachers belonging, 20 

Average daily attendance of pupil-teachers, IS 



superintendent's report. 77 

TEACHERS. 

There were many changes in the teaching corps during 
the year. A number resigned for various reasons, — some 
af them to engage in other occupations or to attend special 
sfj:licK)ls to prepare themselves for special lines of teaching ; 
so tne to accept positions elsewhere ; some to enter upon 
m s?\rried life. Besides the appointments to fill the vacan- 
cies thus occurring, several new assignments were made, 
ric^cessitated by the increase of several hundred pupils in 
the schools. The whole number of teachers now employed 
ii^ the day schools is 152. The transfers that were made 
Were partly in the interest of the schools, others to accom- 
f'^odate individual teachers by assigning them to schools 
r^earer their residences. The appointments were chiefly 
"^^ade from the graduates of our Training school. Some who 
Wt?re appointed, however, were chosen from experienced 
teachers serving elsewhere. There are several reasons 
^^hy all teachers should not be appointed from the gradu- 
ates of our Training school ; but if no reason existed for 
^t^lecting teachers occasionally from abroad, the Commit- 
tee had no choice the past year, as there were not enough 
graduates of our school to satisfy the vacancies. 

The two special teachers in drawing, and several gram- 
inar school teachers, were selected from non-resident can- 
didates. They were all teachers of successful experience, 
and in nearly every case were holding good positions. 
Selecting all the teachers for the schools from home can- 
didates only tends to injudicious appointments at times, 
because of the restricted number from which to choose, 
^nd because personal influence, rather than merit, has too 
great weight. Again, new life and experience is infused 
^"to the home corps by these outsiders, who are neither 
nampered by local usage, nor expect anything to tell but 
the quality of their work. It would be well if some of 



78 superintendent's report. 

our own graduates seek at first other positions, to return to 
positions here later on, broadened by experience gained 
by rubbing against the outside world. The Boston 
School Committee, in its last Report, gives its opinion on 
this subject as follows : 

"We note with pleasure that in this, as in previous 
years, many vacancies have been filled in our corps of 
teachers by persons who have had their education and 
experience elsewhere, and who have been proved by years 
of service to have especial fitness. We believe this is a 
necessity, in order to keep our schools at the highest 
standard. This matter is admirably put in the Annual 
Report of Superintendent Seaver, in 1889, from which we 
quote: 'The generally accepted maxim in the manage- 
ment of educational aflfairs is this : that the teaching staflT 
of an institution should not be recruited exclusively from 
the graduates of the same institution. The neglect of this 
maxim generally results in deterioration of the teach- 
ing and of the teachers. New men, with new ideas, pre- 
vent stagnation, narrowness, conceit, and ignorance. 
Hence, a wisely managed college recruits its faculty in 
part from among the graduates of other colleges ; and the 
same rule will obtain as to the schools of this city, if the 
management is wise. 

"'It is no disparagement whatever of the Boston Normal 
school to say, that its graduates exclusively should not be 
employed in our grammar and primary schools, or to 
prove that an admixture of professional talent from other' 
sources is necessary to the full health and vigor of our 
school system. Nor should it be forgotten that the claims^ 
of the schools to have none but the best teachers appointed 
are infinitely superior to the claims of normal graduates 
receive appointments. 



> » 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



79 



The resignations, leaves of absence, transfers, tempo- 
rary assignments, and appointments for the year are given 
below : 



RESIGNATIONS. 



Florence Cleaves, 
II. Jeiiuie Kirby, 
Mary M. Kobiuson, 
Gertrude M. Robinson, 
Bessie P. Nash, 
Helen C. Allen, 
Susan P. Diman, 
Myra A. Leach, 
Lucy K. Hatch, 
Blanche L George, 



High school. 

Parker Street Grammar school. 
Middle Street Grammar school. 
Linden Street Primary school. 
Maxfleld Street Primary school. 
I. \V. Benjamin Primary school. 
I. \V. Benjamin Primary school. 
Fourth Street Primary school. 
Rockdale school. 
Drawing teacher. 



Leave of Absence. 



Carrie E. Footman. 
Mabel W. Spooner, 



Parker Street Grammar school. 
High school. 



Anna I. Dexter, 
(Jlara C. M. Gage, 
Grace Co veil, 
Alice A. Taylor, 
Eleanor V. Tripp, 
Lillie C. Tillinghast, 
Nellie H. Cook, 
Sara M. Hatch, 
Gertrude M. Robinson, 
Mabel L. Hathaway, 



TRANSFERS. 

from Acushnet Avenue to Linden Street, 
from Acushnet Avenue to Maxfield Street, 
from Acushnet Avenue to Fourth Street, 
from Fourth Street to L W. Benjamin, 
from Cedar Grove Street to I. W. Benjamin, 
from Cannon ville to Fourth Street, 
from I. W. Benjamin to Dartmouth Street, 
from Dartmouth Street to Cedar Grove Street, 
from South Mill to Linden Street, 
from I. W. Benjamin to Cedar Street. 



TEMPORARY ASSIGNMENTS. 



Alice P. Terry, 
Mabel Besse* 
Marguerite J. Steel, 
Isabel S. Horr, 
Ruby M. Tripp, 



Rockdale school. 
North school. 
Parker Street school. 
Cedar Grove Street school. 
South Mill school. 



8o 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



APPOINTMENTS. 



Katheriue M. Cral)tree, 
Julia C. Giftbrd, 
Elizabeth B. Brightinaii, 
Susan n. Lane, 
Mary W. Leymuuion, 
Helen Rin^, 
Charlotte M. Allen, 
Margaret II. Holmes, 
Harriet N. Hyatt, 
Julia M. Pilling, 
Harriet L. Cornell, 
Sara M. Hatch, 
Nellie H. Cook, 
Ethel W. Denham, 
Lucy K. Hatch, 
Amelia F. Keen, 
Dora A. DoWolf, 
Annie M. King, 
Ruth E. Pease, 
Fannie M. Spooner, 
Mary W. Gilbert, 



High school. 

Middle Street Grammar scliool. 
Parker Sti*eet Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Thompson Street Grammar school. 
Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
Acushnet Avenue Primarv school. 
.Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
Dartmouth Street Primary school. 
L \V. Benjamin Primary school. 
Cannonville Primarv school. 
Rockdale school. 
Rockdale school. 
Training school. 
Training school. 
Training school. 
Training school. 
Drawing teacher. 



COLUMBUS DAY. 



Columbus Day was suitably observed in all the sciiooLs 
and was an object lesson that will not soon be effaced from 
the memories of the thousands of children who partici- 
pated in the patriotic exercises. The official program 
issued by the national committee formed the basis of all 
the orders of exercises ; in each school, however, the pro- 
gram was modified to suit the grade of school and the 
facilities of the school building. A national flag was fur- 
nished by the School Committee for each school house 
which was not already supplied with one, and ''Old Glory" 
was saluted by the thousands of school children as it was 
unfurled to the breeze. A detail of veterans was sent to 
each school from the Grand Army posts of the city, to 
participate in the exercises, and their presence gave added 
interest to the occasion for the children. Inspiring 



superintendent's report. 8 1 

addresses were made in many of the schools by clergy- 
men and other prominent citizens, and the proceedings of 
the day could not have failed to have implanted patriotic 
sentiments deeply in the minds of the pupils. 

The teaching of patriotism in the public schools of this 
country is an all-important duty, which the teachers can- 
not aflbrd to neglect. The selfish spirit of the day which 
threatens in its greed the very foundations of good gov- 
ernment, and the heterogeneous character of our popula- 
tion, which is to be constantly reinforced by thousands of 
immigrants to whom the history and traditions of this 
country are utterly unknown, make this duty all the more 
imperative at the present time. It is not by the celebration 
of special days alone that a love for their country is to be 
instilled into the minds and hearts of the children, but bv 
the daily inspiration of patriotic song and story, and by 
lessons drawn from the noble lives of those who by hon- 
esty of purpose and by self sacrifice for their country's 
good have contributed to its glory. 

THE PEDAGOGICAL LIBRARY. 

The number of books now in this library is 207. Last 
year a complete list of all the books in the library at that 
time was published in the Report, with titles and names of 
authors. But few volumes have been added since, as fol- 
lows : 

No. 203. Developmeat Tiessons DeGraff. 

204. Arbor Day Maaual Skinner. 

205. Sewing, Illustrated Louise J. Kirkwood. 

206. Longmaus* Object Lessons • Salmon. 

207. French Schools through American Eyes. Parsons. 

No. 206 was a gift to the library from the firm of Long- 
mans, Green & Co., and No. 207 was also presented to the 
library by C. W. Bardeen & Co., Syracuse, N. Y. It 

II 



82 superintendent's report. 

gives me pleasure to acknowledge hereby the thoughtful 
kindness of these firms. I have but one word to say in 
relation to the library. It deserves better patronage from 
the teachers. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING IN THE SCHOOLS. 

Two years ago I called the attention of the Committee 
to the need of a change in the methods pursued in the 
schools in conducting physical exercises. I showed at 
that time that no system prevailed in teaching the subject; 
that the exercises were of little real value ; and in some 
cases were, without doubt, productive of harm. The 
Committee at the time were inclined to agree with me that 
something should be done to place the teaching of the sub- 
ject on a different basis. I was instructed to look into 
the different systems of physical culture and report to the 
Committee. I did so, and as the Ling system of Swedish 
gymnastics recommended itself as most suitable for school 
purposes, a graduate of the Boston Normal School of 
Gymnastics was engaged to give the teachers of the city 
a series of lessons in demonstration of the svstem. The 
lessons were very well received by the teachers, and I 
believe that it would have been well for the schools if these 
lessons had been continued until the teachers had become 
thoroughly conversant with the plan and aim of the sys- 
tem. Nothing further was done, however, by the Commit- 
tee in the matter, presumably because it was not pressed. 

When the subject was first called to the attention of the 
Committee, Boston was about the only city in the State 
that had adopted the Ling or any other system of gymnas- 
tics. Since that time, however, a number of cities in the 
State, and a number elsewhere, have adopted the Swedish 
system, and in answer to correspondence on the subject 
the school authorities express themselves well pleased 
with it. 



superintendent's report. 83 

The following extracts from one of the manuals of 
Swedish gymnastics will give some idea of the principles 
underlying the system and its scope : 

"1. In selecting the exercises of the Ling system, the 
fundamental rule prevails of subordinating every move- 
ment to the laws of the human organism : it is the duty of 
the gymnastics to obey nature. 

" 2. The Swedish training accepts no movements other 
than those having a distinctly defined purpose, namely, to 
develop the body toward health, beauty, and power, so far 
as inherited tendencies permit; and, by thus developing 
physical strength, endurance, and agility, to create joy of 
living and doing, powerful will, presence of mind, and 
courage. 

''3. A central aim of the movements is to develop the 
respiratory organs ; every exercise must be executed with 
full, free breathing. 

"4. Every movement employed is of distinctly defined 
form, and of known general and local effect. 

" 5. The movements are performed to words of com- 
mand ; strict discipline and attention must be maintained 
in order that the prescribed number of motions may occur 
in the alloted time, and thus enable the teacher to oversee 
all, to correct faults, and prevent disorder and carelessness. 
As a result, the senses are stimulated ; the pupil is accus- 
tomed to obedience, observation, and attention, the love 
of order and promptness is cultivated, — all qualities of the 
highest importance for the whole life, and under all cir- 
cumstances. 

"6. The Swedish gymnastics are accessible to all, — 
they are not limited to a small number of people of excep- 
tionally good physique. 

^'7. That no over-exertion or injury take place, the sys- 
tem begins with the simplest and easiest, and gradually 



8o 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



APPOINTMENTS. 



Katheriue M. Crabtree, 
Julia C. Giftord, 
Elizabeth B. Bri^htiiiaii, 
Susan H. Lane, 
Mary W. Leyniuuion, 
Helen Ring, 
Charlotte M. Allen, 
Margaret II. Holmes, 
Harriet N. Hyatt, 
Julia M. Pilling, 
Harriet L. Cornell, 
Sara M. Hatch, 
Nellie H. Cook, 
Ethel W. Denham, 
T-.ucy K. Hatch, 
Amelia F. Keen, 
Dora A. DeWolf, 
Annie M. King, 
Ruth K. Pease, 
Fannie M. Spooner, 
Mary W. Gilbert, 



High school. 

Middle Street Grammar scliool. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school, 
lliompson Street Grammar school. 
Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
Acushnet Avenue Primarv school. 

« 

.Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
Dartmouth Street Primary school. 
I. W. Benjamin Primary school. 
Cannonville Primary school. 
Rockdale school. 
Rockdale school. 
Training school. 
Training school. 
Training school. 
Training school. 
Drawing teacher. 



COLUMBUS DAY. 



Columbus Day was suitably observed in all the sclioolss- 
and was an object lesson that will not soon be effaced fronx 
the memories of the thousands of children who partici-^ 
pated in the patriotic exercises. The official program 
issued by the national committee formed the basis of all 
the orders of exercises; in each school, however, the pro- 
gram was modified to suit the grade of school and the 
facilities of the school building. A national flag was fur- 
nished by the School Committee for each school house 
which was not already supplied with one, and "Old Glory'' 
was saluted by the thousands of school children as it was 
unfurled to the breeze. A detail of veterans was sent to 
each school from the Grand Army posts of the city, to 
participate in the exercises, and their presence gave added 
interest to the occasion for the children. Inspiring 



superintendent's report. 85 

colics. Mens sana in sano corpore is one of the best safe- 
guards against the tendency to hurtful indulgences. 

THE EXTENSION OF MANUAL TRAINING IN 

THE SCHOOLS. 

In a few months the new school house on the corner of 
Pleasant and Kempton streets will be completed, in which 
rooms have been planned for a cooking school and a wood- 
working department of manual training. 

The Committee has already voted to engraft instruction 
in cooking into the curriculum, but, as yet, no action has 
been taken as to wood-working, although individual mem- 
bers of the Committee have made more or less investiga- 
tion of the subject with that end in view. When we have 
incorporated into our curriculum a complete course in 
manual instruction, for both boys and girls, extending 
from the kindergarten to the high school, and embracing 
it, shall I feel that our schools are giving the pupils the 
kind of instruction and training that modern conditions 
demand. 

The weight of opinion among educators, I think it is 
safe to say, is in favor now of this kind of instruction in 
the public schools. Ways and means are the considera- 
tions that prevent its general adoption, rather than any 
question as to its practical and pedagogic value. The 
great and enterprising centres, both East and West, are 
rapidly leading the way, and in many places where public 
funds are not yet available for this purpose, public spirited 
citizens are contributing their means to further this 
kind of teaching. In some places the gifts are made 
directly to the public schools, while, in others, noble insti- 
tutions like the Pratt Institute, in Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
the Drexel Institute, in Philadelphia, have been founded 
and richly endowed, wherein industrial training in many 



82 superintendent's report. 

gives me pleasure to acknowledge hereby the thoughtful 
kindness of these firms. I have but one word to say in 
relation to the library. It deserves better patronage from 
the teachers. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING IN THE SCHOOLS. 

Two years ago I called the attention of the Committee 
to the need of a change in the methods pursued in the 
schools in conducting physical exercises. I showed at 
that time that no system prevailed in teaching the subject; 
that the exercises were of little real value ; and in some 
cases were, without doubt, productive of harm. The 
Committee at the time were inclined to agree with me that 
something should be done to place the teaching of the sub- 
ject on a different basis. I was instructed to look into 
the different systems of physical culture and report to the 
Committee. I did so, and as the Ling system of Swedish 
gymnastics recommended itself as most suitable for school 
purposes, a graduate of the Boston Normal School of 
Gymnastics was engaged to give the teachers of the city 
a series of lessons in demonstration of the svstem. The 
lessons were very well received by the teachers, and I 
believe that it would have been well for the schools if these 
lessons had been continued until the teachers had become 
thoroughly conversant with the plan and aim of the sys- 
tem. Nothing further was done, however, by the Commit- 
tee in the matter, presumably because it was not pressed. 

When the subject was first called to the attention of the 
Committee, Boston was about the only city in the State 
that had adopted the Ling or any other system of gymnas- 
tics. Since that time, however, a number of cities in the 
State, and a number elsewhere, have adopted the Swedish 
system, and in answer to correspondence on the subject 
the school authorities express themselves well pleased 
with it. 



superintendent's report. 83 

The following extracts from one of the manuals of 
Swedish gymnastics will give some idea of the principles 
vinderlying the system and its scope : 

"1. In selecting the exercises of the Ling system, the 
fundamental rule prevails of subordinating every move- 
ment to the laws of the human organism : it is the duty of 
the gymnastics to obey nature. 

** 2. The Swedish training accepts no movements other 
than those having a distinctly defined purpose, namely, to 
develop the body toward health, beauty, and power, so far 
as inherited tendencies permit ; and, by thus developing 
physical strength, endurance, and agility, to create joy of 
living and doing, powerful will, presence of mind, and 
courage. 

''S. A central aim of the movements is to develop the 
respiratory organs ; every exercise must be executed with 
full, free breathing. 

'*4. Every movement employed is of distinctly defined 
form, and of known general and local effect. 

"5. The movements are performed to words of com- 
mand ; strict discipline and attention must be maintained 
in order that the prescribed number of motions may occur 
in the alloted time, and thus enable the teacher to oversee 
all, to correct faults, and prevent disorder and carelessness. 
As a result, the senses are stimulated ; the pupil is accus- 
tomed to obedience, observation, and attention, the love 
of order and promptness is cultivated, — all qualities of the 
"'ghest importance for the whole life, and under all cir- 
^^rtistances. 

'* 6. The Swedish gymnastics are accessible to all, — 
they are not limited to a small number of people of excep- 
tionally good physique. 

7. That no over-exertion or injury take place, the sys- 
^^ni begins with the simplest and easiest, and gradually 



> 



84 superintendent's report. 

proceeds to the more complicated and difficult move- 
ments." 

Last fall, by request of one of the grammar masters, -p- 
the question was again brought to the attention of the 
School Committee, and a special committee was appointed 
to investigate the subject further and report upon the 
advisability of introducing some system into the schools. 
That committee will probably report favorably upon the 
adoption of some system, for investigation will certainly 
show that there is need of it. 

Where careful examinations of the physical condition o 
school children have been instituted, the facts revealed 
show conclusively that by far too little attention has been 
given to the physical welfare of the pupils. Instruction in 
physiology and hygiene and the effects of stimulants and 
narcotics upon the human system are subjects of compul- 
sory instruction in the schools of this State and those of^ 
other States. 

These subjects have their proper place in the school 
curriculum, and will do good if the subjects are presented 
rationally and intelligently. But it is the merest farce to 
teach hygiene and physiology to pupils from text-books 
and at the same time confine them in buildings that are 
unhealthful, compel them to sit in seats that deform their 
bodies, and, if any physical training is given, know not 
whether it is healthful or harmful. It is as much the duty 
of school authorities to provide for the physical develop- 
ment of the children, while under their charge, as it is to 
provide for their mental and moral development. That 
this has not been done, witness the school houses of the 
past (as well as some of the present), and witness, also, 
the physical condition of many of the pupils in the schools. 
Were there more sound bodies in the world there would 
be less recourse to soul-destroying stimulants and nar- 



superintendent's report. 85 

erotics. Mens sana in sano corpore is one of the best safe- 
guards against the tendency to hurtful indulgences. 

T^HE EXTENSION OF MANUAL TRAINING IN 

THE SCHOOLS. 

In a few months the new school house on the corner of 
Pleasant and Kempton streets will be completed, in which 
rooms have been planned for a cooking school and a wood- 
^vorking department of manual training. 

The Committee has already voted to engraft instruction 
in cooking into the curriculum, but, as yet, no action has 
been taken as to wood-working, although individual mem- 
bers of the Committee have made more or less investiga- 
tion of the subject with that end in view. When we have 
incorporated into our curriculum a complete course in 
manual instruction, for both boys and girls, extending 
from the kindergarten to the high school, and embracing 
it, shall I feel that our schools are giving the pupils the 
kind of instruction and training that modern conditions 
demand. 

The weight of opinion among educators, I think it is 
safe to say, is in favor now of this kind of instruction in 
the public schools. Ways and means are the considera- 
tions that prevent its general adoption, rather than any 
question as to its practical and pedagogic value. The 
great and enterprising centres, both East and West, are 
rapidly leading the way, and in many places where public 
funds are not yet available for this purpose, public spirited 
citizens are contributing their means to further this 
kind of teaching. In some places the gifts are made 
directly to the public schools, while, in others, noble insti- 
tutions like the Pratt Institute, in Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
the Drexel Institute, in Philadelphia, have been founded 
and richly endowed, wherein industrial training in many 



86 superintendent's report. 

lines is given at a nominal cost to those who desire it. 
In Boston, the kindergartens, which were started by a 
wealthy and philanthropic lady, and maintained by her 
for years, at a cost of thousands of dollars, have now 
become a part of the school system of that city. Within a 
few years, also, in addition to the sewing, which has been 
a part of the school work for years, cooking schools have 
been established in nearl3'^ all its school districts, if not in 
all. Besides all this, a "Manual Arts High School" is in 
process of construction in that city at a cost of $100,000, 
which is to supplement the work which is now being done 
throughout all the schools in wood-working. And yet 
Boston is a conservative city. 

But it is not only in such cities as Boston, Philadelphia, 
Washington, and Detroit that manual instruction is being 
made a part of the school courses. Smaller cities and 
towns throughout the whole country are hastening to do 
what is within their power to give the pupils of their schools 
this training, which is not only of practical value, but is 
pedagogically sound, as has been demonstrated under the 
fire of most adverse criticism. Can New Bedford, a cit\- 
whose growth and prosperity is due to its industrial pur- 
suits, afl^ord to be a laggard in providing for her youth the 
kind of instruction which pertains to her very life? 

I have dwelt somewhat at length upon what is being 
done elsewhere in manual training, in order to show the 
general trend of thought in this direction. Since what I 
write in this Report is especially for home consumption, it 
may not be amiss to consider here, for the benefit of our 
citizens who have given this subject little or no considera- 
tion, some of the reasons why manual training is now so 
strongly advocated for the public schools. I shall present, 
however, only a few, without elaborating to any extent 
the arguments in favor of these claims. 

It is claimed for manual training : 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 9I 

of modern school organization, and which is a necessitj-, 
especially in cities and large towns, that the details of 
management shall assume too great importance and occupy 
time that should be given to the consideration of weightier 
matters. Certainly it should always be clearly before 
school authorities that all the machinery incident to the 
schools is for one purpose only, the promotion of the well- 
being of the pupils. Proper school houses are to be pro- 
vided that the health of the children may be conserved ; 
suitable teachers are to be placed in charge that the 
mental and moral attributes of the pupils may be properly 
developed and trained. 

But the responsibility of educating children can never 
be thrust entirely upon the school and satisfactory results 
be obtained. The home must always have not only its 
own peculiar responsibilities in the matter, but its direct 
responsibility to the school. Nor must the church, as a 
very important factor, be forgotten. The school is the 
child's workshop, and he should so regard it. It should be 
made healthful and pleasant for him, to be sure, and all its 
associations should be elevating, so far as it is possible for 
the school authorities to make them so. But on the other 
hand, the duty rests with the parents to impress upon their 
children that they go to school to work ; that in doing this 
work they will be brought into relation with others in a 
manner that will necessitate the surrender on their part of 
some of their desires ; that this is a lesson which all must 
learn, for when they are grown and mingle with the larger 
world, they will be called upon to do the same. Some 
criticisms that are made upon the schools lead one to think 
that many are of the opinion that schools should cater to 
the whims and idiosyncrasies of children and not eradicate 
them. Complaints are too often listened to from children 
and judgments passed without due consideration of cir- 
cumstances and effect. There is a growing and mistaken 



88 superintendent's report. 

instruction from an educational, as well as from a social 
political standpoint, is a necessity. From an educational 
standpoint it is necessary, because hand labor securei* 
knowledge and understanding, which cannot be secured 
by mere observation, but which for mental training and for 
life is, however, of the highest importance. From a sociaU 
political, and pedagogical standpoint, it is indispensable, 
because hand labor serves in the forming of concepts 
which, for the peaceable intercourse of humanity, for 
moral conduct, and for the existence of the State, are of 
the greatest significance." I quote also from M. Jules 
Ferry, who, when French Minister of Public Instruction, 
said in a speech upon the occasion of laying the corner 
stone of the school for primary, superior, and professional 
instruction (at Paris) : "We desire to ennoble labor. 
We have written this motto in large letters upon our pro- 
gramme, and we have chosen the surest, indeed the only, 
means of securing the recognition of the nobility of hand 
labor, not only from those who exercise it, but also from 
society as a whole. We have introduced hand labor into 
the school itself! 

"Believe me, when the plane and file are accorded their 
place of honor by the side of the compass and the map 
and the text-book in history, and when they become 
the objects of rational and systematic instruction, only then 
will a great amount of prejudice die out, and much of the 
spirit of caste vanish away. Social peace will find a place 
upon the seats of the elementary school : and harmony, 
with her beaming light, will illuminate the future of the 
nation !" 

When we see what industrial training in the schools is 
doing for France to-day, the words of her statesman prove 
to be more than a flight of oratory. 

That manual or industrial training, whichever name 
may be applied to it, is to become a constituent and impor- 



superintendent's report. 89 

lant part of public school instruction in this country there 
is no longer any doubt. The mistake that has been made, 
and is still being made, is that it is being started at the 
wrong end. It should begin at the bottom, and not at the 
top ; with the kindergarten and not with the high school. 
The foundation must be laid before the talents and pow- 
ers of the child become arrested in their development. 
For once arrested, it is hard to call them forth again and 
still harder to develop them. I think it has been well said 
that the order should be something like this : The gen- 
uine Froebelian kindergarten should be organically united 
to the school. Labor should stand in the foreground until 
the tenth year ; from the tenth to the thirteenth year labor 
and instruction should be equal in importance ; from the 
thirteenth to the fifteenth year instruction should be in the 
foreground. Labor should precede instruction until the 
thirteenth year, while from that time forward instruction 
should lead to labor. 

If manual instruction is to become an essential part of 
our school instruction (and, as I have stated before, 
I think it is), it means a great deal. It means more than 
ordering such a course to be engrafted upon the school 
curriculum. It means a complete readjustment of the 
school organization and the preparation of teachers to 
take up this work. And, if this change is to come, why 
5;hould not this fact be taken into consideration in the con- 
struction of all new school houses, and in the preparation 
of teachers for the new line of work. For I am earnest in 
the belief that this work, to be a success, must be done, at 
least in the elementary schools, in the same buildings 
where the other instruction is given, and under the general 
supervision of the principals of the schools. This is done 
in France, and we may well look to her experience for 
guidance in this matter. 

12 



90 SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 

The question is a far-reaching one, and one that calls for 
the most thoughtful consideration, both from school 
authorities and the public at large. 

WHAT IS TO BE THE FUTURE OF THE 

SCHOOLS? 

It is not with any expectation of being able to answer 
this question that I have raised it. But it is a question of 
serious moment. It concerns the family, the community, 
the State ; it is a matter of financial interest to every tax- 
payer ; it determines in a large measure the quality of 
the country's future citizenship. Is it not, then, worthy 
the thoughtful attention of every citizen? Should it not 
be approached by those who feel that there are wrong 
tendencies in the present line of school work with a spirit 
of earnest desire to seek the truth and assist in its attain- 
ment, and not in a censorious spirit that helps not, but 
rather injures the best efforts of those who are earnestly 
striving for the right. 

The complexity of modern civilization makes it all the 
more difficult for the schools to prepare their pupils for 
the spheres of life that they are to occupy. The attempt 
to do so by the introduction of new branches of study is met 
by the cry, "Fads and fustian." It is claimed that the 
schools are being overloaded ; that the pupils are being 
harassed with many things and the result will be that they 
will neither obtain knowledge nor mental grasp. 

There is undoubtedly some occasion for this feeling and 
the school is unquestionably passing through a crucial 
period, as are many other affairs outside of the school. 
While experience is always a dear lesson, there seems to 
be no other way of solving this question of school policy 
except by experiment and constant readjustment. Most 
assuredly there is great danger, owing to the intricacies 



superintendent's report. 91 

of modern school organization, and which is a necessitj-, 
especially in cities and large towns, that the details of 
management shall assume too great importance and occupy 
time that should be given to the consideration of weightier 
matters. Certainly it should always be clearly before 
school authorities that all the machinery incident to the 
schools is for one purpose only, the promotion of the well- 
being of the pupils. Proper school houses are to be pro- 
vided that the health of the children may be conserved ; 
suitable teachers are to be placed in charge that the 
mental and moral attributes of the pupils may be properly 
developed and trained. 

But the responsibility of educating children can never 
be thrust entirely upon the school and satisfactory results 
be obtained. The home must always have not only its 
own peculiar responsibilities in the matter, but its direct 
responsibility to the school. Nor must the church, as a 
very important factor, be forgotten. The school is the 
child's workshop, and he should so regard it. It should be 
made healthful and pleasant for him, to be sure, and all its 
associations should be elevating, so far as it is possible for 
the school authorities to make them so. But on the other 
hand, the duty rests with the parents to impress upon their 
children that they go to school to work ; that in doing this 
work they will be brought into relation with others in a 
manner that will necessitate the surrender on their part of 
some of their desires ; that this is a lesson which all must 
learn, for when they are grown and mingle with the larger 
world, they will be called upon to do the same. Some 
criticisms that are made upon the schools lead one to think 
^hat many are of the opinion that schools should cater to 
^he whims and idiosyncrasies of children and not eradicate 
^hem. Complaints are too often listened to from children 
and judgments passed without due consideration of cir- 
cumstances and effect. There is a growing and mistaken 



92 superintendent's report. 

tendency to pamper children ; to yield to their distaste for 
work rather than to encourage them to patient effort in 
accomplishing their daily tasks. The schools feel this 
tendency more than they ought. It is fatal to true pro- 
gress. 

What the future of the schools is to be will depend 
largely on what the public will have them. For the 
schools are very close to the people. Their will is but to 
be expressed and such changes as they desire will surely 
come. 

In closing, I will say that the tendency is towards 
instruction which is concrete and practical, as opposed to 
that which is chiefly abstract. Whatever the future of the 
schools may be, their product should be wholesome, 
upright citizens, who shall recognize the value and dig- 
nity of honest labor and practice it, in whatsoever call- 
ing they may choose. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM E. HATCH, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



93 



LIST OF TEACHERS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Summer street, between Mill aud North streets. 



Grade. 



2 

a 

4 
4 

4 



Ray Greene Huling, principal, 
Charles T. Bonuey, Jr., sub-master, 
Charles R. Allen, science teacher, 
Sarah D. Ottiwell, assistant, 
Elizabeth P. Briggs, 
Lydia J. Cranston, 
Lucretia N. Smith, 
Mabel W. Cleveland, 
Mary E. Austin, 
Helen L. Iladley, 
Emma K. Shaw, 
Katharine M. Crabtree, drawing 
teacher and assistant in English, 
John K. McAfee, military instructor, 



(( 



ii 



(» 



(( 



(k 



u 



il 



195 Cottage street, ^2,750 
121 Washington St., 1,600 

1 Lincoln street, 1,500 

184 Kerapton street, 1,000 

3f5G Union street, 900 

81 Xorth street, 900 

72 Foster street, 900 

81 North street, 750 

512 Kempton street, 900 

196 Griunell street, 750 
72 High street, 900 

256 Union street, 650 

6;^ Fifth street, 300 



f^FTii Street : 



6 



8 
•J 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



Fifth street, corner of Russell street. 



Allen F. Wood, principal, 

Lydia A. Macreading, assistant, 

Harriet F. Hart, 

Marv E. Allen, 

Sarah E. Stoddard, 

Emma A. McAfee, 

Janet Hunter, 

Blanche W. Sheldon, 

Mary A. Kane, 

Grace L. Carver, 

Nancy H. Brooks, 



kh 



kh 



(,i 



fc; 



44 



111 Acuslinet avenue, 1,900 

17 Bonney street, 600 

233 Acushnet avenue, 600 

25 Madison street, 600 

352 County street, 600 

63 Fifth street, 600 

55 North Sixth street, 600 

41 Fifth street, 550 

157 Griunell street, 600 

147 Acushnet avenue, 500 

135 Fourth street, 600 



94 



superintendent's report. 



Middle Street: 



Summer street, between Elm aud Middle streets. 



Grade. 

George II. Tripp, principal, 

5 Agnes J. Dunlap, assistant, 

6 Katharine Commerford, '* 

6 Etta M. Abbott, 

7 Lucy B. Fish, 

7 Julia C. Gifford, 

8 Clara B. Watson, 

8 Maria B. Clark, 

9 Mary R. Hinckley, 
9 Clara S. Vincent, 



u 
(I 

it 
k( 



Fairhaven, $1,900 

117 Ilillmau street, 600 

634 County street, GOO 

103 School street, 600 

115 Maxfleld street, 600 

85 Fifth street, 450 

37 Fifth street, GOO 

131 Chestnut street, 600 

111 High street, GOO 

233 Middle street, 600 



Parker Street: 



5 
5 
6 
6 

7 
7 
7 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 
9 



Parker street, near County street. 



Charles E. E. Mosher, principal, 

Helen Ring, assistant, 

Anna L. Jennings, 

Susan U. Lane, 

Emma D. Larrabee, 

Martha A. Hemenway, 

Regina M. Paul, 

Elizabeth B. Brightman, 

Mary W. Leymunion, 

May L. Pettey, 

Mariana N. Richmond, 

Mary E. Sturtevaiit, 

Lizzie E. Omey, 

Emily A. Delano, 



(( 



(i 



(( 



it, 



n 



(i 



(I 



(i 



(k 



%i 



ik 



k( 



92 High street, 1,900 

271 Union street, GOO 

115 Maxfleld street, 600 

264 Pleasant street, 550 

Chestnut and Willis, 550 

5 Lincoln street, 600 

29 Parker strt»et, 475 

137 Chestnut street, (»00 

83 School street, 600 

22 Pope street, 600 

34 High street, 600 

220 Summer street, 600 

63 Thomas street, 550 

East Freetown, 575 



Thompson Street: 



flV 



Thompson street, corner Crapo street. 



/ 
8 
8 
9 
9 
10 
13 



Katharine N. Lapham, principal, 

Cora B. Cleveland, assistant, 

Elizabeth Bennett, 

Mary A. Macy, 

Daisy M. Butts, 

Charlotte M. Allen, 

Leonora B. Hamlin, 



a 



i,i 



ki 



Ik 



ki 



Union and Sixth sts.. 1,200 

81 North street, 475 

46 State street, 475 

72 Bedford street, 600 

116 Willis street, 475 

118 Fifth street, 400 
South Orchard street, 500 



superintendent's report. 97 

Linden Street: 

Linden street, near Ashland street. 
Grade. 

10 Elizabeth P. Spooner, principal, 129 Hillman street, $600 

11 Isabella Luscomb, *' 245 Cedar street, 550 

12 Isadora Foster, " 48 Parker street, 550 

13 Lucy S. T-each, " 91 Maxfleld street, 550 
13 Anna I. Dexter, '* 11 Franklin street, 500 

Merkimac Street: 

Merrimac street, corner of State street. 

10 and 11 Sarah H. Hewins, principal, 111 Merrimac street, 600 

12 Addie West, assistant, 232 Pleasant street, 550 

13 Harriet S. Damon, " 223 Pleasant street, 550 

Maxfield Street: 

Maxfleld street, corner of Pleasant street. 

13 Mary B. White, principal, 57 Foster street, 600 

12 Annie E. Pearce, assistant, 151 Hillman street, 550 

11 Clara C. M. Gage, '' 78 Mill street, 550 
10 Mary E. Pasho, '' 169 Grinnell street, 450 

William Street: 

William street, between Sixth and Eighth streets. 

10 Eleanor Commerford, principal, 634 County street, 600 

11 Mary J. Graham, assistant, 12 Court street, .550 

12 Kate E. Cleary, ^^ 61 Mechanics lane, 550 

13 Amelia Lincoln, "' 87 Walden street, 550 

COUNTRY SCHOOLS. 
ACUSHNET : 

Acushnet avenue. 

Charlotte C. Carr, principal, 56 Spring street, 700 

Belle B. Wheeler, assistant, 2 Mt. Vernon street, 550 

Caroline O. Pierce, '' 1 Spruce street, 550 

CLARK8 Point: 

Julia A. Fay, principal, 685 South Water street, 525 

North : 

Mary I. Ashley, principal, Clifford, 600 

Agnes E. Braley, special assistant, Clifford, 320 

13 



96 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



Cedar Street: 



Grade. 
10 



Cedar street, corner of Maxficld street. 



Annie 8. Uomer, principal, 

1 1 Bessie P. Pelrce, assistant, 

12 Abbie D. Whitney, " 

12 Annie L. Edwards, ** 

13 Willetta B. Nickerson, '' 
13 Mabel L. Hathaway, 

Cedar Grove Street: 



kk 



117 Hilhnan street, 

124 Ilillman street, 

59 Hill street, 

62 North street, 

21 Morgan street, 

141 Summer street. 



Cedar Grove street, near Acushnet avenue. 



13 
13 
12 
12 
11 
10 



Lucy F. Clark, principal, 
Mary J. Eldridge, assistant, 
Edith K. Weeden, 
Annie G. Brawley, 
Carrie A. Shaw, 
Flora E. Estes, 



10 and 11 Sara M. Hatch, 
Cannonvillk: 






131 Chestnut street, 
200 South Second stre 
614 County street. 
23 Washburn street, 
Belleville, 

535 Purchase !*treet, 
1213 Acushnet avenue 



Rockdale avenue. 



10 and 11 Adelaide .r. McFarlin, principal, Cottage and Kenipto 
12 and 13 Ethel W. Denham, assistant, 3(»3 Cottage street, 

Dartmouth Street: 

Dartmouth street, corner of Hickory stn^t. 



11 Isadore F. Eldridge, principal, 
10 and 11 M. Eva Schwall, assistant, 

12 Edith M. B. Taber, 

12 Annie F. Smith, 

13 Grace H. Potter, 
13 Sara H. Kelley, 
13 Nellie H. Cook, 

Fourth Street: 



&( 



ki 



a 



(I 



a 



28 Sherman street, 
11 Bonney street, 
82 Walden street, 
18 Bonney street, 

4 Orchard street, 
24 Seventh street, 

6 South Ash street 



Fourth street, corner of Madison street. 



10 Sarah H. Cranston, principal, 

11 KYvAii H. Sanford, assistant, 

12 Sarah E. Sears, 
11 and 12 Annie L. Macroadlng, 

13 Lillie C. Tillinghast. 
13 Grace Covell, 



Ik 



k« 



Ik 



81 North sti-eet, 
112 Fourth street, 

21 Griffin 8tret»t. 

17 Bonney street, 

16 Fifth street, 
128 School street. 



superintendent's report. 97 

LixuEN Street: 

Lindeu street, near Ashland street. 

Grade. 

10 Elizabeth P. Spooner, principal, 129 Hillman street, $600 

11 Isabella Luscomb, ^^ 245 Cedar sti-eet, 550 

12 Isadora Foster, " 48 Parker street, 550 

13 Lucy S. I^Ach, " 91 Maxfleld street, 550 
13 Anna I. Dexter, *' 11 Franklin street, 500 

Mkrrimac Street: 

Merrimac street, corner of State street. 

10 and 11 Sarah H. Uewins, principal. 111 Merrimac street, 600 

12 Addie West, assistant, 232 Pleasant street, 550 

13 Harriet S. Damon, " 223 Pleasant street, 550 

Maxfield Street: 

Maxfleld street, corner of Pleasant street. 

13 Mary B. White, principal, 57 Foster street, 600 

12 Annie E. Pearce, assistant, 151 Hillman street, 550 

11 Clara C. M. Gage, " 78 xMill street, 550 

10 Mary E. Pasho, " 169 Grinnell street, 450 

^ViLLiAM Street: 

William street, between Sixth and Eighth .streets. 

10 Eleanor Commerford, principal, 634 County street, GOO 

11 Mary J. Graham, assistant, 12 Court street, 550 
^- Kate E. Cleary, '' 61 Mechanics lane, 550 
^3 Amelia Lincoln, '' 87 Walden street, 550 

COUNTRY SCHOOLS. 

^Ct SHNET : 

Acushnet avenue. 

^arlotte C. Carr, principal, 50 Spring street, 700 

^lleB. Wheeler, assistant, 2 Mt. Vernon street, 550 

-Jiroline O. Pierce, " 1 Spruce street, 550 

^'-AKKs Point: 

^ulia A. Fay, principal, 085 South Water street, 525 

XORTH : 

^*7 1. Ashley, principal, Cliffonl, 000 

•^gneg E. Braley, special assistant, Cliftbrd, 320 

13 



98 superintendent's report. 

Plainvillk: 

Mary E. Ilaney, principal. Fairhaveu, $ ■ 

Rockdale; 

Amelia F. Keon, principal, 67 Parker street, 

MILL SCHOOLS. 

NOKTH : 

In Merrimac Street school buildinji:. 

Emma R. Wentworth, principal, 117 Uillman street, $15.50 per we- 
Kate Sweet, assistant, 121 Kempton street, 11.25 *• 

South : 

In Thompson Street school building. 

Lucy .L Keminjcton, principal, 493 County street, $15.50 per wc5 
Ruby M. Tripp, assistant, 407 Cedar street, 10.00 " 

SPECIAL TEACHERS, 
Drawing : 
Mary W. Gilbert, 20 Seventh street, $1. 

Singing : 

F. H. Butterfleld, 40 Chestnut street, 1, 

Sewing : 

Carrie H. Richmond, 43 Fifth street, i 

Eliza A. Smalley, 71 South Sixth street, : 

Gertrude II. Leonard, 62 Fifth street, •? 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

George H. Nye, $9.00 per we* 

George A. Stetson, 7.00 *' 

Katharine M. Crabtr«'e. 6.00 

EVENING ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Fifth Street: 

Oliver W. Cobb, $9.00 per we 

Mrs. C. T. Johnson, 4.12 ** 

Grace H. Potter, 4.12 '' 

Nancy H. Brooks. 4.12 



superintendent's report. 



Aui.ieF. Smith. 
Ali«f. A. Taylor. 
Kat«» Moore, 
^'elliell. Cciok. 
torn. G. Bliiglev. 
Bi^lle Alray, 
Sui-ali E. Stoddmii, 
Lizzie M. Briggs. 
Julia C. Gilford. 
Grace W. Kussell, 
Anuic L. Burbaiik. 

Mkrkiiiac Stkeet: 
Mary A. Kane, 
AHc«A. Bichardson, 
l*lanche W. SheldoD, 
Harriet L. Cornell, 
Mahel I.. Hathaway, 
An»a 1. Hathaway, 
Sarali E. Kirwhi, 
Ploreuce A, Poole, 
^af.v.r. Eldridge, 

'*arkeb Street: 
*^eorge H.Tripp, 
*^'"ace C. Bates, 
Leona M. Boswonh, 
** A.iimTal>er, 
^i-i- F Wilde. 
-^-Qtii,. Murphy 
"^gliia M. Paul, 
*'»illa W. Coriah, 

^•>AK Ghove Street: 
^'len F. Wood, 
*«Oa8SI. Brigga, 
*ttQieG.Brawley, 
^»nnle P. Slocum, 
^^. .1. E. Edwards, 
^ary W. Uymunlon, 
^ary R. HiDckley. 

Abbie R. Johnson, 

^'ora F,. Estes. 

'ftabelle S. Horr, 



fl.OO per week. 



4.12 

4.12 



lOO 



superintendent's report. 



Thompson Street: 



Joseph P. Kennedy, 
Mrs. S. C. Wheldeii, 
Janet Uiinter, 
Emma Gartland, 
Annie M. King, 
Caroline E. Bonney, 
Lena B. Hamblin, 



(M^.OO per week. 
4.12 
4.12 
4.12 
4.12 
4.12 
4.12 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THF. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OK THK 



City of New Bedford. 



'Io(;ktiikk with i in 



Superintendent's Annual Report 



FOR THE YEAR 1893. 



Report of the Secretary. 



Hv direction of the School Coimnittee, I submit to our 
feHow-<!itizpnrt tlu* folh)win^ Ri^port for the year 1S93. 

STATISTICS. 

I. POPILATION AM) VALl'ATION. 

The populutioii of the citv (census of 1880) was 2(),875 

The population of the city (census of 1890) was 40,705 

Entiniated population of the city (Dec. HI, 1898,) is 50,(KK) 

Valuation of taxahle property (1898) is 41,771,200 

II. SCHOOL CENSIS. 

School census, Mav, 1892 (children hetween five and fifteen 
years of age), 8,(»0.5 

School census, May, 1898 (children hetween five and fifteen 
years of age), 9,4(M) 



SCHOOL (.'KNSrs HY WARDS. 



Ward One, 
Ward Two, 
Ward Three, 
Ward Four, 
Ward Five, 
Ward Six, 



Inci-ease during the year (children between five and fifteen 
years of age), 8(»1 



1892. 


1898. 


(inin. 


2,882 


8,280 


898 


727 


784 


57 


(i98 


741 


4;^ 


489 


499 


10 


71K) 


827 


87 


8,019 


8,88o 


81(i 



8,005 9,4(;0 801 



In S(?hool Committek, 

Jan. 2, 1894-- 

Foff.tl, That tlui Se<»retarv prepare the Annual Itc^port ^'^ 

the Seliool Board for tlie year 1893, and that l.oOO copie!=* ^** 
the same lie printed. 



Report of the Secretary. 



Bv direct ion of the School Coininittee, I sulmiit to our 
fVillowMTitizoiKS tlie following R(»port for the year 1893. 

STATISTICS. 

I. POPl LATION AND VALIATION. 

The population of the city (census of 1880) was 2(),875 

1"he population of the city (census of 181K)) was 4(),705 

Kstimated population of the city (Dec. H\, 1893,) is 50,()(K) 

X'ahiation of taxable property (1893) is 41,771,2<K) 

II. SCHOOL CKNSIS. 

^>chooi census, May, 1892 (children between five and fifteen 

years of age), 8,(*»05 

^>ohool census, May, 1898 (children between five and fifteen 

years of age), UMU'y 



SCIKJOL CEN'SL'S BY WARDS. 



^Vard One, 
^Vard Two, 
^^'ard Three, 
^'ard Four, 
^^'ard Five, 
^^'ard Six, 



I ncrease during the year (children bet\\een five and fifteen 

years of age), 8(»1 



1892. 


1893. 


(rain. 


2,882 


3,280 


398 


727 


784 


57 


<J98 


741 


43 


489 


499 


10 


I'M) 


827 


37 


3,019 


3,335 


310 



8,005 9,40(> SOI 



4 SCHOOL REPORT. 

LOCATION OF CHILDRKN BETWEEN FIVE AND FIFTEEN YEARS OF A(iK. 

AS REPORTED BY THE CENSUS OFFICERS. 





Attending' 


Attendiiiff Private and 


Attending 




Public Schools. 


Parochial Schools. 


no School. 


Ward One, 


\Am 


1,525 


589 


Ward Two, 


475 


170 


i;^.» 


Ward Three, 


GU 


49 


78 


Ward Four, 


38(; 


47 


(h; 


Ward Five, 


56;^ 


IfM 


100 


Ward Six, 


1,988 


7-23 


«i4 



5,192 2,678 1,596 

The scliool census returns give a fair idea of the growth of 
tlie city. The reports sliow that there was an increase of 80 1 
children in tlie city from June 1, 1892, to June 1, 1893, he- 
tween the ages of five and fiilteen years. This was 147 mon? 
than the gain of the preceding year, and indicates a gain of 
population in the city of 5000 persons during 1898. 

Th(j reports rev(?al the fact also that tliere were 454 more 
pupils not attending school between the ages of five and fifteen 
years than in the years 1891-92. Of these the greater uuni- 
her were children who had either completed their .school time 
and wer(» at work, or who w(»n» under compulsory school age. 
Of the 1.590 reported as not attending school 1,214 were in 
Wards One and Six. 

The census ref)orts indi<*ate also that the private and paro- 
chiiil schools made ihc larg<*st percent^ige of gJiin hi enrollment, 
whihi the rc|)orts to mc from tlu; t<*achers of those schools show 
a large; dtMTcase. I cannot undertake to explain this dis- 
crc]>ancy. Houhtlcss many |)u|»ils are re|)orted from both the 
]ni))Iic and pairu'hial schools. A number of private and paro- 
chial scho(»ls are carried on in the citv which have never been 
approved l>y the School Committee. Some of them ai*e known 
to fall far short of State recpiirements, and the large number 
of pu|>ils in them makes the question of their efficiency a very 
im)M)rtant one. 

Witliout jpiestion there are but few children in the city 1h?- 
twccn the au'es of eijrlit and fourteen vears who do not attend 



SCHOOL REPORT. 5 

.school ; Imt surely it is very unfortunate that so many children 
lH*tween the a^es of five and eight are not in school. By 
•ibsence from school at this period of their lives they lose valu- 
u.ble time and opportunity whieli can never be recovered. 

III. SCHOOL organization: 

Hijrh, 1 

'F raining school for teachers. 1 

Orammar, 5 

Primary, 12 

CJountrv, 5 
Mill. 



o 



26 

IV. SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

Occupied bv the .schools, 22 

R<M)MS rSEI) FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES (DAY SCHOOLS^, INCLUDING HALLS 

AND RECITATION ROOMS. 

High, 17 

Training, 9 

Orammar, 40 

Primarv, 72 

Min, " 4 

Country, 9 

Manual Training, 1 

Rooms unoccupied. 8 



ToUl, 160 

Rooms used for both dav and evening schools, 25 

Rooms used for Evening Drawing school, 3 



Scuts Unoccupied. 

12 
310 
301 

38 

20 

66 



Total 5,854 747 





V. SEATS 




Scats Occupied. 


Hi?h school, 


395 


(irammar ^(chools, 


l,5a3 


Primary schools, 


3,184 


Training schools, 


347 


Mill schools. 


116 


Country iMrhools, 


229 



I 



b SCHOOL REPORT. 

VI. TEACHERS. 

Whole number in service, Dec. 22, 1893 : 

High school, i:{ 

Training school, 11 

Grammar schools, 40 

Primary schools, 74 

Country schools, 7 

Mill schools, 4 

Special teachers, fi 

Temporary assistants. 2 

Evening schools, .59 

Total, 2U; 

VH. PUPILS. 

DAY SCHOOLS, 1893. 

Whole number of pupils enrolled of all ages, (>,884 

Average number pupils belonging. .5,.'>43 

Average daily attendance, 4,985 

Per cent, of attendance, 89.9 

Number of half-days' absence. 207,257 

Number cases tardiness, 15,429 

Number cases dismissal, 26,545 

Number cases truancy reported by teacher^, 218 

Number cases corporal punishment, 986 

Number cases of suspension, 11 

Ilalf-days' absence of teachers, 1,322 

Number cases tardiness bv teachers. 134 

Number visits made the schools by the Superintendent, 451 

Number visits made the schools bv the School Committee, 481 

Number visits made the schools by parents and others, 2,004 

EVKNING SCHOOLS, 1893. 

Whole number pupils enrolled, 2,632 

Average number belonging. 1,198.8 

Average nightly attendance, 943.3 

Per cent, of attendance, 70.3 

Total nights' absence, 12,456 

Number of cases tardiness, 881 

Number visits by Superintendent. 16 

Number visits bv School Committee, . 118 



8CH00L REPORT. 7 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL, 1893. 

Whole number pupils enrolled^ 135 

^-Xverage number belonging, 59*^ 

^•Vverage nightly attendance, 46.2 
i^er cent, of attendance, 77 

>»' umber visits made by the Superintendent, 3 

N'uniber visits made bv School Committee, 6 

COST OF INSTRUCTION PER SCHOLAR BY SCHOOLS. 

Ill this connection the cost of instruction ])er scholar is 
based upon the average number belonging to each school dur- 
ing the year^ and the amount expended for hire of teachers, 
fuel, care of school houses, books and supjilies (except those 
furnished from the income of the Salvia Ann Howland fund), 
the term "caro of school houses ' inchiding only the salaries of 
janitors. 

Elsewhere in the Report is given the cost, by departments, 
of each pupil, based on the average number belonging and the 
total amount expended for the maintenance of each department 
during the year. This last computation furnishes basis upon 
which tuition of non-residents will be collected. 

Table 1. This table is computed, as in former Reports, on 
the items classified above. 

The cost of maintenance of each pupil in the Migh school for 

the year has been, $47.07 

Grammar department : 

Kifth Street, $27.06 

Middle Street, . 26.39 

Parker Street, 23.43 

Thompson Street, 22.18 

Cedar Grove Street, 15.71 

Harrington Training, 29.79 

Primary department : 

Harrington Training, $23.02 

Acushnet Avenue, 14.50 

I. W. Benjamin, 17.97 



8 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Cedar Street, $19.28 

Cedar Grove Street, 19.32 

Cannonville, 19.36 

Dartmouth Street, 17.43 

Fourth Street, 17.52 

S. A. Howland, 19.11 

Linden Street, 17.21 

Merrimac Street, 24.41 

Maxfield Street, 19.8t) 

Thompson Street, 17.42 

Country schools : 

Acushnet, $29.80 

Clark's Point, 26.80 

North, , 34.89 

Plain vilie, 31.07 

Rockdale, 28.19 

Mill schools : 

North Mill, $35.88 

South Mill, 27.:« 

Evening schools : 

Cedar Grove Street, $5.51 

Fifth Street, 4.27 

Merrimac Street, 5.73 

Parker Street, 8.61 

Thompson Street, 4.46 

Evening Drawing, 12.29 

The average cost of a 

Grammar school pupil was $24.69 

Primary school pupil was 18.57 

Country school pupil was 31.06 

Mill school pupil was 31.07 

Evening Elementary school pupil was 5.77 

Evening Drawing school pupil was 12.29 

The average cost of a day school pupil was $23.04 

Table 2. The averaj^e cost per pupil, by (lepailmenU, 
leased on the avcMa<i:(' mimber belonginji; and total expenditures 
for eaclj depart iiiont, was as follows : 

High school, $50 61 

Grammar schools, 25.97 

Primarv schools, 20.17 



SCHOOL REPORT. 9 

<^*ountrj schooU, $3^.88 

>fill schooU, :i5.*i8 

Kvenin^ Elementary KchooU, • 5.77 

JbC\ ening Drawing school, 12.21) 

•Xverajje cost of a day school pupil, $24.78 
^\\erage cost of an Evening school pupil, including Drawing 

school, 5.50 

• 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITIRES FOR \H\)H. 

RKCEIPTS. 

(ieneral and special appropriations as follows : 

Kor teachers salaries, $iW,(KK).()0 
Incidentals (including salaries of officers and janitors, 

books, supplies, fuel, etc.), 28,H5().(M) 
Repairs of buildings and furniture, 8,0(M).flO 
Special appropriations : 
Kitting and furnishing rooms at Dartmouth St.. I. W. Benja- 
min, and S. A. I lowland schools, 3.025.(M) 
C(K*king school, 600.0() 
-Nianual Training school, 1,000.00 



$i:^7,275.(K) 



EXPKXDCTl'RKS. 



For teachers' salaries : 
l^^ay schools, $94,051.57 

H^ vening schools, 4,739.48 



$9S.791.00 



For incidentals : 

^*»alarie« of officers, including truant officers and messenger, $5,549.99 

^S^larie> of janitors, day and evening schools, 1 1 ,452.1 1 

V'uel for schools, 7.042.80 

Kooks and supplies, 4,027.59 

1 leating apparatus, 1 .847.53 
MiKcellaneous (including rent of School Committee rooms and 
other rooms used for school purposes, lighting evening 

KchoolK, janitors* supplies, school furniture, etc.), 5.98H.12 

^'or repairs of buildings and furniture. (>. 210.44 
^or fitting and furnishing new rooms at Dartmouth St., 1. W. 

Benjamin, and S. A. Ilowland schools, 2,8.*{9.28 

^orCooking school, 501.10 

^or Manual Training, 1 1 .57 



2 



$l44,2t)9.53 



10 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Summary : 
Receipts, $137,275.00 

Transferred from unappropriated fundh, 5,9H7.20 

I'nappropriated balance for manual trainintf and 

cooking carried forward to 18J)4, 1,027.:^3 $144,><«>.o:< 

DOG VVSD. 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1893, $3,195.(U 

Received, Feb., 1893, l,i<H».40 $4,401.44 

Expenditures for 1898, l.cm.in 



Balance, $:<,»W.2S 

Received from non-resident pupils, which has 
been paid to City Treasurer and placed to 
account of unappropriated funds, $992.22 

Received from sale of books and supplies, IfS.O:^ $1.008.2.") 

SYLVIA ANN IIOWLANI) KDICATIONAL FINO. 

Balance of income on hand, Jan. 1, 1893, $.311.98 

Interest for the vear, 3,000.01) 



$3,31L98 
Kxpenditurcs for the year, 3,l(M.73 



Balance, Jan. 1 ,• 181M, $207.25 

Cost of books and supplies during 1893, $3,104.73 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1893, 189.23 



$;^,293.97 



Cost of books and supplies charged to schools, 1893, $2,953.55 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1894, 3Ii6.72 

Cash receipth from hale of supplies. 3. 69 



$:L-2t»3.1HI 

J)isl)iirs(MiH'nts to tlio s«'v<'ij»l .schools, and otliorwiso, arc ys 
follows : 

High school. !H^).m; 

Fifth Street (irannnar school, 198.06 

Middle Street (i ram mar school, 111.72 

Parker Street (Grammar school, 186.75 

Thompson Street Grammar school. 168.26 



SCHOOL REPORT. 11 

Linden Street Primary school, $52.58 

Merrimac Street Primarv school, 57..34 

Maxfield Street Primary school, 38.72 

Cedar Street Primary school, 73.02 

Acu-shnet Avenue Primarv school, 73.23 

S. A. I lowland Primarv school, 27. 4i) 

Fourth Street Primary school, 41 .H7 

Dartmouth Street Primarv school, 107.16 

Cedar Grove Street Primary school, 281.38 

Harrington Training school, 1)2.70 

Acu>hnet school, 42.25 

Cannonville Primary school, 13.11 

Clark's Point school, 19.93 

North school, 108.98 

PlainviUe school, 17.3H 

Rockdale school, 87.79 

North Mill school, 2.72 

South Mill school, 2.31 

I. \V. Benjamin Primary school, 97.41 

Drawing teacher, .75 

Care of musical instruments, 329.00 

Express and freight, 76.00 

Pedagogical library, 9.91 

Covering and binding hooks, 90.69 

Miscellaneous supplies, 55.95 

Cash sales, 12.69 

Stock on hand, Jan. 1, 1894, 336.72 



$3,25)3.96 



DETAILED STATEMENT. 

Outlav l)v the School Coinmittc^e iVoin the income of tlic 
Sylvia Ann Howland fund, fi'oni »Jan. 1, 1893, to .Jan 1, 1894: 

BOOKS AND PKRIODK ALS. 

•Vmercan Book Co.. $H4.71 

Boston School Supply Co., 57.21 

Century Publishing Co., 7.50 

Kducational Publishing Co., 31.70 

Kducator, The 13.(MI 

(iinn & Co., 201.86 

Ooldthwaite, William M. 8.65 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 127.84 

Heath, D. C. & Co., 28.73 



12 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., $148.3« 

Harper & Bros., 3.68 

Knowlton, McLearv & Co., 3.00 

Lee & Shepard, 97.m» 

Leach, Shewell & Sanborn, 44.70 

Lothrop, 1>. & Co., .80 

Miller, Samuel K. 4.(K> 
Ma8tiachusettK Society for Prevention of Crueltv to 

Animals, L(M) 

N. E. Publishinjj Co., 17.50 

Putnams, G. P. & Sons, 32.00 

Russell Publishing? Co., 2.00 

Silver, Burdett & Co.. 48.34 

Sheldon & Co., 12.50 

Schoenhof & Co., S.«0 

Taber, R. W. 121.7« 

I'niversitv Publish ini; Co., 3L47 

Youths' Companion. 8L3U $L220.2S» 

PKI).\U(KiKAL LIBRARY. 

Hutchinson, II. S. ^: Co., $8.20 

Silver, Burdett & Co., .lU 

Taber, R. W. .80 tl.JM 

MISK DKI'ARTMENT. 

Oitson. Oliver A: Co., $4.50 

(iinn & Co., 354.H4 

Heath, I). C & Co.. 15.00 

Peirce, (ieorj^^e 321).00 

Silver. Burdett .S: Co.. 77.81 

White, Smith iV Co., 13.fiO 7W.55 

HIM)IN(i \\l) l<)VKRI\(i HOOKS. 

(iannnons, Charlotte M. $4. (JO 

(Jibbs. Kli/abeth 1.15 

llolden Patent Book CoNcrCo.. 24S>.57 

Kane. I). J. (Mi. 14 

Merrick. Kinnia J. 4.00 

lVrr\. (ieo. S. .V Co.. 31.(M) 

Potter, llattie 4.«0 

Potter. Franci^i 4.H0 

Watrous, Joseph 32.88 

Win J,', Charles K. LOO 44MI.14 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



Anrhonv, E. & S<iiik, 
llammMl.J. L. 
I'errv. <ieo. S. i Co.. 



Heath. D. C. & Co. 




J^nninK-, W. A. 




>iilvcr. Burden & C. 




Hl..-.-.->.n, ,\. C. 




DeWolf & ViriL-enl, 




Einier & .\n>ei>d. 




Fniiiklin tducalioni 


il Co.. 


Kail, Thomas & So: 




Hawkins, Chns. N. 




Hawkins, Herbert 11 


. K. 


N. B.<ias& Edison 


Light Co., 


Purrington, Brown 


and Rii-liHrd> 


StninKe, K, W. 




Sunlev. \. .\. 





Bo>ton SihooJ Siijiplv Co., 
Bliss & Nve, 
HIakF. James E. 
Caproni, P. P. & Hro.. 
Educational Publinhing Co., 
Franklin Educational Co., 
Kraier. (ieo. B. 
(iinn & Companv, 
Haves. N. P. 
lla-nmeti. I. L. 
Hillman & Washburn. 
Heath, 1). C. & Co., 
Lumbard. .\. M. 
^c.Mli-icr T. U. 
■Mercuri PuWii'hinjj Co., 
Penv, iieorge S. & Co.. 
Richter. (ieortJcH.&Co., 
Tiber, R. W. 



14 SCHOOL REPORT. 

The income of this fund has been expended, as in preceding 
years, in accordance with the terms of the bequest as in- 
terpreted by the Committee. This income is a relief in that 
amount to the sum required to carry on the schools : for the 
articles purchased for our schools from this fund, although not 
required by the Stsite laws, are now considered necessities in well 
equipped schools and are furnished in the progressive cities 
from the general fund. If the income from this fund was re- 
duced, either the schools would sutfer, or it would be a simple 
shifting of the city's liabilities. 

TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

STATEMENT. 

Cost of books and 8upplie^ purchased during 1898. $4.0*i7..'>J> 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1898. 1. 618.14 



$5,(>40.7:i 



Cost of books and supplies charged to schools in 1898, $4,828.52 

Cost of books and supplies in stock, Jan. 1, 1894, 1,290. IS 

Cash receipts from sale of books and supplies, 16. (W 



$o,W0.78 

Tlie cost ill detail of books and supplies furnished the 
several schools for the vear 1893 is as follows: 





Supplies. 


Books. 


Totiil. 


High school, 


$509.77 


$487.47 


$997.24 


Fifth Street Grammar 


>chool, 274.1.5 


271.12 


545.27 


Middle Street '• 


210.90 


227.15 


444.05 


Parker Street 


256.61 


266.98 


5-23.54 


Thompson St. '• 


181.99 


64.82 


246.81 


Harrington Training: 


88.80 


55.0;^ 


143.;« 


Acushnet Avenue Prin 


larv school, 78.85 


56.81 


180.16 


I. W. Benjamin ' 


92.27 


50.98 


14;<.-25 


Cedar Street 


47.02 


20.50 


67.52 


Cedar (jrove Street 


91.65 


101.18 


192.78 


Cannonville 


21.18 


11.11 


32.24 


Dartmouth Street 


62.65 


76.02 


138.67 


Fourth Street 


45.69 


26.11 


71.80 


Linden Street 


28.09 


28.56 


.51.(tt 


Merrimac Street 


88.22 


•26.53 


59.75 



SCHOOL REPORT. 15 



Maxfield Street Primary school, 


$30.11 


$19.01 


$49.12 


S. A. Howland 






21.85 


17.08 


38.93 


North Mill 






12.20 


4.68 


16.88 


South Mill 






um 


18.90 


30.93 


Acushnet 






:i3.54 


71.98 


105.52 


Clark's Point 






19.24 


6.95 


26.19 


North 






23.59 


•29.27 


54.86 


Plainville 






13.94 


2.0;^ 


16.97 


Rockdale 






29.41 


29.06 


58.47 


Cedar Grove Street E^ 


I'ening 




15.31 


29.71 


45.02 


Parker Street 


it 




5.18 


9.48 


•' 14.66 


Fifth Street 


(( 




7.94 




7.94 


Merrimac Street 


i( 




5.94 


12.76 


18.70 


Thompson Sti-eet 


• t 




10.29 


24.58 


34.87 


Evening Drawing 




4 « 


22.90 . 




22.90 



$2,288.76 $2.0;^9.76 $4,328.52 

The jivera»^t' (lost por pupil in the (liff(»reiit departineiits of the 
ijehools, for books and supplies, has been as follows : 

High school, $2.58 

Grammar schools, 1.14 

Primary schools, .34 

Country schools, 1.28 

Mill schools, .45 

Average for day schools, .75 

" evening schools, .12 

Drawing school, .38 






SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

In most rapidly growing cities it is a difficult matter for the 
School Department to secure accommodations for the pupils as 
^oon as needed. If the School Department acts promptly there 
is usually delay on the part of the City Government in making 
ti»e appropriations for the required buildings and contracting 
for the same. 

New Bedford is no exception to this rule. Six rooms of 
the Acushnet Avenue school have been closed, and will remain 
jjo for some months, the pupils being without a school habita- 
tiou fur that time, owing to the delay in beginning the alter- 



16 SCHOOL REPORT. 

ations in that building. Had the work been begun at the 
coinmencemont of the sumuuM* vacation the present unfortunate 
situation miglit have been avoided to a great extent. When 
the addition is completed we shall have a ten-room buihliuir 
available, where formerly tluMe was a six-room buihling. 

The Fourth Street building, an old wooden structure* of six 
rooms, is being replaced by a fine eight-room brick Ituilding. 
While this building is being enacted the primary pupils of thi^ 
district arc* accommodated in the P^ifth Street Grammar build- 
ing — the hall being utilized to provide for them — and in the 
abandoned William Street Prinuirv school house. 

The changes in the Acushnet Avenue sc^hool house, and the 
n^building of the Fourtli Street school house, an* in line f>f the 
recommendations made* in last year's report. It is unfortunate, 
however, that so ex])ensive a building Jis the new one of th(? 
Fourth Street school shouM be built upon a lot so small that 
every foot of ground space is occupied by the building, having 
no play-ground whatsoever. It is also so near the surrounding 
buildings that the free admission of light is interfered with, as 
well as a good circulation of air about the building. 

In the south part of the city the facilities have been in- 
creased during the year by the addition of a room in the third 
story of th(i Thompson Street school house. The pupils of two 
rooms from the Acushnet Avenue school are now housed in the 
attic of tin' Thompson Street s<*hool house, necessitating the use 
of the front tmtrv-wav for one of the Mill schools. Practical Iv, 
therefore, but one extra room, and that in the attic, will b(» at the 
disposal of the S<'hool Department in the south part of the city, 
with which to UM'et the natural increase the coming year. It 
is none too rarly to secure a suitable lot in that s(»ction upon 
which to erect a school liouse in the near future. Unless the 
city ceases to grow in that dinM*tion, a building will lx» needed 
there befr)n; it is built, and children will Ih) clamoring for 
admission who cannot be accommodated. 



SCHOOL RfiPORT. 17 

In the north-west part of the city there is already an over- 
flow, in the Linden Street building, and for more than a year a 
section of this school has l>een housed in a church on Weld 
street. The Linden Street school house is one of the few 
remaining in the city of the old type. It lias low ceilings, one 
narrow hall, and no methods of ventilation, except by windows. 
While not seriously uncomfortable, it is old, inadecjuate in size, 
and not of such construction as to admit of enlargement. 

In closing, I wish to emphasize the point that the School 
Committee does not recommend the construction of costly 
school houses. It considers the Thompson Street school house 
a good type. It is sufficiently ornate, is well lighted, has wide 
corridors, and the rooms are all attractive and comfortable. 
This building, with eight rooms and a roomy third story, 
wherein two rooms have since l)eeii fitte<l, cost h^ss than 
$30,000. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HATCH, 

Secretiirv. 



3 



18 SCHOOL REPORT. 



In School Committee, 

December 2fl, ISiW. 



On motion of Mr. Godfrev : 



Resolved, That the Board expresfies its thanks to the Superintenden '^ 
and Secretary for the faithful discharge of his duties and his uniforn-"* 
courtesy to the Committee. 

On motion of Mrs. Borden : 

T^esolved, That the thanks of the Board are extended to Mayor Brock, 
for the ability and impartiality with which he has presided at the meetingt^ 
of the year, and for his unvarying courtesy to the members. 

On motion of Dr. Pothier: 

T{esolved,, That this Board thanks its Vice-Chairman for the dignity 
and urbanity with which he has performed the duties of his office duringj' 
the past year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 19 

NEW BEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATING 

EXERCISES JUNE 30, 1893. 

PRAYER. 

1. DAMASCUS TRIUMPHAL MARCH, From ^'Naaman.** (Cosia.) 

2. SALUTATORY ADDRESS, Maud Almy. 

3. ORATION, "The Rise of the Laboring Man," Clarence P. Emerv. 

MUSIC. 

4. CHORUS, "Abide with Me." (Bennefi,) 

5. ESSAY, "The Utility of Fiction," Mabel P. Nichols. 

MUSIC. 

6. CHORUS, "Song of the Vikings." (Faning.) 

7. BOURNE PRIZE ESSAY, "The Annexation of Hawaii," 

Carrie X. Ellis. 
MUSIC. 

8. PART SONG, "The Image of the Rose." (Reichardl.) 

i). PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS, His Honor, Mayor Brock. 

Ill ovoT-TVTr- e/^w/' • Words bv Grace L. Bennett. 

l'». rARlINO SONG. ^. m • * ju /^ c j /m i i 

t Music arranged b\ C. Fred, Clarke, Jr. 

We are gathered here, dear classmates, 

On our Graduation Dav; 
We now pass the bounds of school- life, 

With its clouds and sunshine gay. 

'Though our fondest ties we sever, 
As we breast life's troubled sea. 

We must part — perhaps forever. 
Farewell, Class of Ninety-Three. 

What shall coming years accord us? 

Duties earnest, joy or care? 
Loving friendships, or sad burdens. 

Seeming oft too great to bear? 

Ah I Life's sands are ever shifting ; 

Mists will fall 'twixt heart and heart, 
As we watch our classmates drifting 

Slowly, surely, far apart. 

But faith sees a grand reunion 

When we stand 'neath Heaven's dome, 

When, our tasks and toils well ended, 
The Great Teacher calls us home. 



20 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



11. VALEDICTORY,* 



Carrie N. Ellis. 



♦Charles N. Haskins, who, if present, would he the Valedictorian, is to^ay 
taking examinations at the Mass. Institute of Technolog^y. 

GRADUATES. 



•'Be selfreliant." 



Clavton Albiston. 
Joseph Henrv Allen, 
Herbert Tompkins Hlake, 
Thomas Jefferson Bradv, 
Charles Frederick Clarke, Jr., 
Allen Swift Crocker, 
Clarence Percv Emerv, 
Joseph Anthonv Frasier, 
William Gordon, 
Charles Nelson Haskins, 
George Coggeshall Hatch, Jr., 
Charles Augustine Irving, 
Harrie Bradford Jennings, 
John McCullough Kelleher, 
Holder Crary Kirby, 
Edward Norris Milliken. 
Charles Alexander Morrison, 
Frank Winfred Morse, 
Frank Bridghani Perry. 
Frederic Russell Smith, 
William Boulay Smith, Jr., 
(Jeorge Thomas Sperry, 
Rodolphus Ashley Swan, 
Everett Clifton Tripp, 
Frank Bertram Wade, 
Winfred Reuel Washburn, 
William Joshua Weeks. 

Maud Almy, 
Ruth Potter Almy. 
Emma Ashley, 
Julia Bancroft, 
(jrace Loring Bennett, 
Annie Deborah Borden, 
Kstelia May Carter, 
Maria Almv Chad wick, 



Mabel Kempton Crapo, 
Susan Allen Croacher, 
Sadie Howard Dexter, 
I sa belle Eva Duddy, 
Carrie Naomi Ellis, 
Laura Ward Estes, 
Martha Ellen Evans, 
Amy Maria Fanning, 
Sarah Eliza Faunce, 
Ada Louise Field, 
Mary Eleanor Gibbs, 
Ida Augusta Gifford, 
Sarah Anthony Gifford, 
Helen Gertrude Harwood, 
Emma Louise Hatha wav, 
Adaline Elzadah Hawes, 
Elizabeth Clarke Holmes, 
Grace Evelyn Johnson, 
Estella Elizabeth King, 
Laura Clarke McCabe, 
Mabel Parker Nichols, 
Esther Warren Paul, 
Annie Ellen Payne, 
Sadie Peck ham, 
Mabel Maxfield Post, 
Anna Congdon Potter, 
Marv Church Potter, 
Mary Leonore Rogers, 
Addie Matthews Smalley, 
Mabel Florence Springer, 
Daisv Anita Sweet, 
Hattie Augusta Taylor, 
Grace Cushing Terry, 
Luella Richmond Tripp, 
Ruth Almvra Wilde. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 21 

RECIPIENTS OF CERTIFICATES. 

Chapman Allen, Helen Louise Reynolds, 

Uvin Cutler, Annette Bird Russell, 

Jartlett Lewis, Marv Anna Taber. 



m 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



NEW BEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

RATES OK TUITION FOR \ON-RESIUENT PIPILS. 18M. 





First 


Second 


Third 


?^or th« 




lerm. 


Term. 


Term. 


Year. 


High school, 


$15.18 


$15.18 


$20.25 


$50.61 


Grammar schools, 


7.80 


7.79 


10.38 


25.96 


Primary schools, 


6.03 


6.06 


8.07 


20.17 


Ungraded schools. 


10.14 


10.14 


13.55 


33.83 


Evening Drawing school, 


1 


1 




1 12.2J» 



SCHOOL RBPOBT. 23 

RULES GOVERNING TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

Maximum. Minimum. 

Principal of High school, $2,750 

Sub-master of '* 1,600 

Teacher of science of '* 1,600 

I^dv assistants of " 900 $660 

Teacher of drawing and assistant in English at 

Hi^h school, 700 

Military instructor of High school, 300 

Principals of grammar schools, 1,900 

Assistants of grammar schools, 600 425 

Principals of primary schools, 600 to SOO 

Assistants of primary schools, 560 375 

I^rincipal of Training school, 1,600 

Assi.Htant principal of Training school, 1,000 

^Senio^s in Training school, 4 per week. 

Juniors in Training school, 3 ** 

C'ngraded schools, 525 to 700 

F*nncipals of evening schools, 3 per night. 

-Assistants of evening schools, 1.60 ♦* 
^uper\'isor of drawing in grammar and primary 

schools, 1,200 

^Supervisor of music, 1,700 

Teacher of sewing* 600 

^'Xssistants at the ra-te of 525 

^Tooking teacher, 600 

The salary of a primary school principal of a four-room 
I MiiUiiug is $600 per year, which is incrojised at the rate of $25 
t^yr each additional room. 

The salaries of assistant teachers in the High school are in- 
^•^reased at the rate of $50 per year until the maximum is 
i^eached. 

The minimum yearly salary of a grammar school assistant is 
tixed at $425, and the yearly advance is $25 per year until 
a- yearly salary of $500 is reached ; the annual increase is then 
♦oO per annum until the maximum ($600) is reached. 

The minimum yearly salary of a })riniary school a^ssistant is 
fixed at $375, and the yearly advance is $25 })er year until a 
yearly salary of $450 is reached ; the annual increase is then 
$50 per annum until the maximum ($550j is reached. 



24 



SCHOOL RBPORT. 



DKrARTMKNT OF PrHLir SrHOOLS. 

bri?:f descrifiion of the school hoises, with 
their accommodations and coxdittons. 



Schools. 



C! 

u 



1 AcuKhnet Avenue, 

2 Acushnet, 

3 1. W. Benjamin, 

4 Cedar Street, 

5 Cedar Grove Street. 
6Cannonville, 
7,Clark'fi Point, 

8i Dartmouth Street, 

9 Fifth Street, 
lO.Fourth Street, 
llHigh, 

12,Harrinorton 'I'rainini^, 
ItSSvlvia Ann liowland, 
14 Linden Street, 
15jMerrimac Street, 

16 Middle Street, 

17 Maxfield Street, 
18* North, 

19 Parker Street, 

20 Plainville, 

21 Rockdale, 

22 Thompson Street, 
2:f William Street, 



o c ^ 



« o 2 6 
'u o - 



I u 



i> ^ 



brick, 
wood, 
brick, 
wood, 
brick, 
wood , 
wood, 
wood, 
brick, 

brick, 
brick, 
brick, 
wood, 
brick, 
brick, 
brick, 
wood, 
brick, 
wood, 
wood, 
brick, 
wood. 



3; 9! ^ 

3 8 

3, G{ 

2 4 
2| 6 

3 9 
2| 4 
V 2 
3 12 

li 1 

1 2 
3,11 

2 4 



X 

M 



Condition, 



X 75 K < , X 

'^ M-i '^ '*i "^ 

' o o P o o 

7, A 7 7 y. 



2 9 


428 


2 3, 


114 


3 12' 


589; 


2 6 


287' 


315 


692; 


2 2 


87' 


1 ^i 


35, 


2. 8' 


392 


310 


1 490 



I 407 

I 385 

196 

'234 

270 

1 413 

203 

88, 

1 537 

28 

50 

4*24 

I 273 



Good. Is being enlarged. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Fair. 

Fair. 

Good. 

Good, [room br'k bids. 

Is being replaced bv an §- 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Fair. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Good. 

Fair. 

Good. 

Good. 

Old and poor. 






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SCHOOL REPORT. 27 

CALENDAR, 1894. 

Winter terra begins Jan. 8, 1894; onds March 30, 1894. 
Summer term begins April 9, 1894; ends June 29, 1894. 
Fall term begins Sept. 4, 1894; ends Dec. 21, 1894. 

VACATIONS. 

March 31, 1894, to April 8, 1894. 
June 30, 1894, to Sept. 4, 1894. 
Dec. 22, 1894, to Jan. 7, 1895. 

HOLIDAYS. 

Every Saturday ; Washington's Birthday ; Fast Day ; Memo- 
rial Day; from Wednesday noon before Thanksgiving the 
T*emainder of the week. 

SCHOOL SESSIONS. 

From March 1 to November 1, 9 a. m. to 11.45 a. m., and 
2 p. M. to 4.15 p. M., in the grammar schools; 9 a. m. to 12 M., 
5ind 2 P. M. to 4 P. M., in the primary schools. 

From November 1 to March 1, the afternoon sessions an* 
from 1.30 o'clock to 3.45 o'clock in the grammar and 1.30 to 
*S.3() in the primary schools. 

High school, 8.30 a. m. to 1.30 p. m., during the whole year. 

The signal 22 (that is, two strokes, an interval, and the two 
strokes repeated) sounded on the fin* alarm at 8.15 a. m. will 
indicate no school in the primary and grammar grades and in 
the Acushnet school in the foi'cnoon. 1'ho same signal sounded 
at 12.45 P. M. will indicate no school in the primary and gram- 
mar grades and in the Acushnet school in the afternoon. If 
the signal is sounded at 8.15 a. m. and not repeated at 12.45 
I'. M., there will be a school session in the afternoon. This 
rejrulation does not apply to the High school or to the country 
5»<*hools except the Acushnet school. 



28 school' report. 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IX THE HIGH S('H<>OI.. 

Appleton's ^'oung Chemi'»t. 

RemsenV Chemistrv, 

DaltonV Ph\>iolojifv and Hv^ienc. 

Dana'?* Geological Storv Briefly Told. 

Gillet & Rolfe's Astronomy. 

Packard's Zooloj^y. 

Ayery's Natural Philo<oph\ . 

^'ollmanV Botanv, 

Apgar's Plant Anal\sis. 

Guyot's Physical Geography. 

Rohinson'f* .\rithnietic, I'art II. 

WcntNyorth's Elementary Algehra. 

Wentworlh's School Algebra. 

WentNyorth's Ncnv Plane GeometrN. 

\Vent%yorth*> Plane and Solid (ieometry. 

WentNvorth's Plane Trigonometry. 

Me.serye\*s Bookkeepinij. 

.Meservey'** Bookkeeping Blanks. 

D. J. Hill's Rhetoric and Composition. 

Lock\yood's English. 

Hutchison's l^hysioloij^v and Hyi'iene. 

Inderwood's American Author>. 

rnderNvocKl's f?ritish Authors. 

Brook's English Literature. 

Douden's Shake-peare. 

Monroe's Sixth Reader. 

Barnes' Historx of Ancient Peoples. 

Swinton's Outlines W'orld'^ Historv. 

Martin's Ciyil (ioNernment. 

Collar \' Danieil'-* BcLiinners' Lalifi Book. 

|ones* Fir>»t Lessons in Latin. 

Ilarknc"*^' Latin (iraniinar. 

Allen M (ireeMou'^h's C:isar. 

CJrecnough's \'irL;il. 

I larkness' Cicero. 

loiies* Latin Prose Coinj>()siti()n. 

White's First Le^^-on-^ in (ireek. 

(Ioo(l\N ill's (ireek Grammar. 

lone^" (ireek Prose Comj^osition. 

Goodwin's Zeno|)hon and Herodotu*-. 

Boise's I lomei's Iliad. 

•Xutenrieth's llonjeric Lexicon. 

Crosby's Greek Lexicon. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 29 



\an Daell*s F'rench Grammar. 
Keetel's P'rench Reader. 
Roulier's First Book French Compo^ition. 
Hennequin*s Idiomatic French. 
Spier^i & Surenne's French Dictionary. 
Sauveur's Causeries avec me» El^ves. 
>Venckebach*8 Deutsche Grammatik. 
Heness* Der Xeue Leitfaden. 
Grimm's Haus Marchen. 
Ooethe*s Hermann and Dorothea. 
Ahn Henn's German Rudiments. 
Otto's German Grammar. 



TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE GRAMMAR SCHOOIi?. 

FVanklin New Third Reader. 

Kranklin New P'ourth Reader. 

FrankHn New Fifth Reader. 

Franklin Sixth Reader. 

Kradburv * Katon's Elementary .Vrithmetic. 

Biadbury's Eaton's Practical Arithmetic. 

^>eaver and Walton's Mental Arithmetic. 

M'arren'.s Common School Geography. 

Harper's Introductory Geography. 

Worcester's School Dictionary. 

Barnes* History U. S. 

Hyde's Language Lessons, Part I. 

Hyde'b Language Lessons, Part II. 

Hvde's Language Lessons, Advanced. 

Harrington's Speller, Parts I and II. 

Child's Health Primer. 

Prang's Drawing Books. 

Harper's Writing Books. 



TEXT-BOOKS USED [X THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

franklin New First Reader. 
franklin New Second Reader. 
Kranklin New Third Reader. 
Harrinjjton's Speller, Part I. 
Prang'K Drawing Books. 
Harper's Writing Books. 



30 SCHOOL REPOBT. 

SUPPLEMENTARY BOOKS FOR READING AND STUDY 
USED IN THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Eggle8ton*8 First Book in American History. 

Higginson's History of the United States. 

Goodrich's Child's History of the United State«. 

Dickens* Child's History of England. 

Andersen's Historical Reader. 

Collier's British History. 

McKenzie's America. 

Ballou's Footprints of Travel. 

Sea Side and Way Side, Part 2. 

Sea Side and Way Side, Part 3. 

Child's Book of Nature, Parts 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Choice Readings in Nature's Book. 

Johonnot's Geographical Reader. 

Scribner's Geographical Reader. 

Our World, Part 1. 

Our World, Part 2. 

Fables and Folk Stories. 

Kingsley's Water Babies. 

Longfellow Leaflets. 

Tanglewood Tales. 

Grandfather's Chair. 

True Stories. 

Robinson Crusoe. 

Golden Book of Choice Readings. 

American Authors. 

Swinton's Book of Tales. 

Swinton's Supplementary Reader. 

Swinton's American Classics. 

Swinton's English Classics. 

Swiss F^amily Robinson. 

McGuffev's Fourth Reader. 

McGuffey's Fifth Reader. 

McGuffev's Sixth Reader. 

Harvey's Fourth Reader. 

Sheldon's Fourth Reader. 

Sheldon's Fifth Reader. 

Royal Fourth Reader. 

Washington Irving's Sketch Book. 

Lincoln's Gettysburg. 

Arabian Nights. 

Vicar of Wakefield. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 31 

King of the Golden River. 

Church's Old World Stories. 

Hans Brinker. 

Black Beauty. 

Little Men. 

Little Flower People. 

Little Lord Fauntleroy. 

Heroic Ballads. 

At the Back of the North Wind. 

Stories of Industry. 

Bluejackets of 1776. 

Blue Jackets of 181*2. 

Blue Jackets of 1861. 

"World at Home, Europe. 

>Vorld at Home, The World. 

Peasant and Prince. 

I'rince and Pauper. 

SUI'PLKMEXTARY READING BOOKS USED IN THE 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

^Ionroe*s Primer. 
Monroe's First Reader. 
Monroe's Second Reader. 
Monroe's Third Reader. 
Parker & Marvel's First Book. 
Parker & Marvel's Second Book. 
Sheldon's Second Reader. 
Sheldon's Third Reader. 
Appleton's First Reader. 
Appleton's Second Reader. 
Appleton's Third Reader. 
Swinton's Second Reader. 
Swinton's Third Reader. 
Willson's First Reader. 
^ViUson•s Second Reader. 
Willson's Third Reader. 
Butler's First Reader. 
Butler's Second Reader. 
Stickney's First Reader. 
Sticknev's Second Reader. 
Holmes' First Reader. 
Holmes' Second Reader. 
Harper's First Reader. 



32 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Harper's Second Reader. 
Normal Primer. 
Normal First Reader. 
Barnes's First Reader. 
Barnes's Second Reader. 
Barnes's Third Reader. 
Modern Second Reader. 
First Term's Work in Readinij. 
Kasv Steps for Little Feet. 
Seven Little Sisters. 
Each and All. 
Andersen's Fairy Tales. 
Robinson Crusoe (in one syllable). 
King's Picturesque Geography. 
Sea Side and Way Side, Part L 
Baker's Young Folks' Geography. 

SUIM'LKMEXTARY HOOKS USKD IX THK HH'H 

« 

SC^HOOL. 

Wells' I'niversity Algebra. 
Chauvenet's Geometry. 
Walpole'n Vergil, Book 1. 

Spraguc's Masterpieces in Knglish Literature. 
Scott's Poems. 
Rolfe's Lady of the Lake. 
Sprague's Parndise Lost, Books 1 and 2. 
Hudson's Shakespeare, Vols. 1 and 2. 
Rolfe's Midsummer Night's Dream. 
Rolfe's Childe Harold. 
Collier's History of Ensjlish Literature. 
Lay of the Last Minstrel. 
\'icar of Wakefield. 
The Merchant of Venice. 
Shakespeare, by R. CJrant White. 
Martin's Knglish Language. 
Strang's Exercises in English. 
Modern Classics : 

Goldsmith, Cowper and Ileman's. 

Fouque and St. Pierre. 

Byron and Hood. 

'IVnnyson. 

Burns and Scott. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 33 

Kieldh and Hawthorne. 

Holmes and Brown. 

Ilowells. 

Campbell and Roger>j. 

Carl vie, Lamb and Southev. 

Wordsworth and Coleridge. 

Dickens and Fields. 

Longfellow. 

Whittier. 

Lowell. 

Hawthorne and Carlvle. 

jickerav's Kssavs on Swift, Congreve, and Steele. 
caula\ 's Life and Writings of Addison, 
e Four CJeorges, Thackeray. 

ackera\'s Kssays on Prior, Gay, Pope, Hogarth, Smollette, Fielding, 
iterne and Goldsmith. 
Iton and Byron, Macaulav. 
Roger de Co/erl\ , from Spectator, 
can lay's Kssay on Johnson, 
caulav's Essays on Goldsmith, Bunvan and Madame l)*.\rhlav. 

* • • • 

IdsmithV Plays. 
Idsmiih's Poems, 
ath's German Dictionary. 
iven*s German Prose. 

nebach's Anschauung's I'nterricht. 

s dem Legen eines Taugenichts. Eichendorff. 

nson*< Schiller's Ballads, 
iver's Contes Merveilleux. 

Roi des Montagnes, About. 

Litt^rature Fran^^iiise Contemporaine, by Pylodet. 

Litterature F^ran^jaise Classique, Mennechet. 
lerson's Kssavs. 
inton's Word Analysis, 
inton's School Composition. 
ingV Sketch Book, 
inklin's .\utobiography. 
lerican Poems, 
out Old Storv Tellers. 
derson*s Historical Readers. 

Tour de la France. 
*rv"s Bible Manual. 
ivcr and Walton's Metric System. 
^'veT*s Metric System. 
Kiel Etymology, Webb. 
iin'8 German Exercises. 

5 



» 



34: SCHOOL REPORT. 

Kellogg*s Rhetoric. 

Smith's Principia Latina. 

Craik*s Knglish of Shakespeare, Julius Citsar. 

Jack8on*8 Mathematical Geography. 

Super's ?"rench Reader. 

Merimee's Columba. 

Von Riehl's Der Fluch der Schonheit. 

Shaler's First Book in Geology. 

Collar's Practical Latin Composition. 

Grev's Lessons in Botanv. 

Woodruff's Exercises in Greek Prose Composition. 

Sir Roger de Coverly Papers. 

Earl of Chatham, Macaulay. 

Courtship of Miles Standish. 

Emerson's American Scholar. 

Comus. 

Lodge's Mechanics. 

Allen's Laboratory Manual. 

Hall and Bergen's Physics. 

The House of the Seyen Gables. 

Fisk's Ciyil Government. 

Luquien's French Prose. 

Hermann and Dorothea. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 35 

SCHOOL BOARD, 1893. 

JETHRO C. BROCK, Major, Chairman, ex-oficio. 



WILLIAM H. PITMAN, Vice-Chaimian. 



WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 



SAMl'EL C. HART, President of Common Council, ex-officio. 



^yarti I — Anna R. Borden, John H. Lowe, Lewis E. Bentley. 
ff^nrd J — Edward T. Tucker, Isaac B. Tompkins, Jr., Frank A. Milliken. 
^''ard s — Stephen H. Shepherd, William R. Channing, William II. Pitman. 
H^ard 4 — George H. Dunbar, William E. Brownell, Seth W. Godfrey. 
H^ard J — Robert W. Taber, Jonathan Howland, Jr., William L. Saver. 
y^ard 6 — ^^joseph C. Pothier, Betsey B. Winslow, Francis M. Kennedy. 



STANDING COMMrriEES. 
William K, Hatch, Secretary. 

The Hrst nnmcd on each standing committee is Chairman of the same. 

On High School — Pitman, Dunbar, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Tomp- 
kins, Shepherd, Saver, Howland. 

On Grammar Schools — ^Tompkins, Pitman, Holland, Dunbar, Mrs. 
^orden, Lowe, Saver, Milliken, Channing. 

On Primary Schools — Shepherd, Pitman, Tompkins, Miss Winslow, 
Kennedy, Godfrey, Channing, Mrs. Borden, Tucker. 

On Country Schools — Lowe, Brownell, Taber, Bentley, Pothier, Tucker. 

On Training School — Pitman, Kennedy, Milliken, Saver, Channing, 
*^rownell. Miss Winslow. 

On Truants — Godfrey, Channing, Milliken, Pothier, Bentlev. 

Oh Mill Schools — Mrs. Borden, Howland, Lowe, Godfrey, Brownell, 
^«ntley. 

On Evening Schools — Kennedy, Lowe, Godfrey, Milliken, Channing, 
■'^Ucker, Bentlev. 

On Music — Milliken, Godfrey, Shepherd, Brownell, Taber, Pothier. 

On Manual Training — Saver, Miss Winslow, Dunbar, Godfrey, Ken- 
"^edv, Mrs. Borden, Tucker, Pothier. 

On Examination of Teachers — Dunbar. Kennedy, Miss Winslow. Mrs. 
"orden. Pitman, Tucker, Brownell. 

On Text-Books — Pitman, Kennedy, Milliken, Sayer, Brownell, Taber. 

On Expenditures — Howland, Tompkins, Pitman, Lowe, Shepherd, 
Kennedy, Milliken, Taber, Hart. 

On Howland Fund — Howland, Tompkins, Pitman, Dunbar, Kennedy, 
Shepherd, Taber, Hart. 

On Rules — Pitman, Dunbar, Howland, Tompkins. 
On Pay-Rolls — Tompkins, Howland, Taber. 



36 SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL BOARD, 1894. 

STEPHEN A. BROWNELL, Mayor, Chairman, ex-oficio. 



ROBERT W. TABER, Vice-Chairman. 



WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 

Office, i;« William Street. 
Office Hours, HM to » a. m., 12hH0 to 1 p. M. Saturdays, U to «;{« a - >* * 



JOHN H. BARROWS, President of the Common Council, ex-officM'tf- 
Kejj:uh«r meeting^s of the Board, first Monday of each mouth at 7..'tt) P. M. 

\V\R1) <)\K. 

Name. Phice of Business. Residence. 

Louis Z. Normandin, 5S4 Purchase street, 5S() Purchase street. 

Anna R. Borden, Ashland and Austin ^^ t =^ * 

John H. LoNvc, I»2.") .\cushnct aNenue, 1>.'M Acushnet avenue. 

WARD TWO. 

Frank A. Milliken. \\\ William street, 2*.K) Pleasant street. 

Edward 'I'. Tucker, 2H5 Pleasant street, 2S5 Pleasant street. 

Lsaac B. Tompkins, Jr., 78 I'nion street, <»9l County street. 

WAKI) TirREK. 

William II. Pitman, Five Cents Savinjjs Bank, (50 Chestnut street. 

Stephen H. Shepherd, Standard Office, 82 Maxfield street. 

William R. Channinir. 11>2 Inion ^treet, 1>1 Mill street. 

WARD F(H R. 

Seth W. (jodtrcy, 42t) I'nion street, 

(ieorge H. Batchelor, 187 Cottage street. 

William F. Browiicll. 271 Inion street. 271 I'nion street. 

WARD I IVK. 

William L. Sayci, Mercury Othce, 70 South Sixth street. 

Robert \\ . Tahcr, Purchase and Hii^h sts., 48 Fifth street. 

Jonathan Ilosvland. Jr., 54 Russell street. 

WARD SIX. 

Franci^i M. Kenncdv, Ftldv Huildini(, i>H W'ashinj^ton >trcet. 

Jo^cpii C. Poihicr, 24() Fourth >treet, 24(» Fourth street. 

IJct^ev W. Winslow, 315Countv street. 



EMMA .M. ALMV, Superintendent's Clerk. 



IIFNRV SMITH, Truant Othcer, 872 Cottage street. 
Oflue Hours, 1J..{0 to 1 r. m.; Saturdays. !♦ to 9.31) A. M. 



(;K0R(,F K. 1).\MM0N. Messeni^ar and Truant Officer, 187 Smith 



SCHOOL REPORT. 37 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

William E. Hatcii, Secretary. 

The first named on each standing committee is Chairman of the same. 

0« High School — Pitman, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Tompkins, 
Shepherd, Saver, Howland. 

Oh Grammar Schools — Tompkins, Pitman, Howland, Lowe, Mrs. 
*^orden. Saver, Milliken, Channing. 

Oh Primary Schools — Shepherd, Tompkins, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Bor- 
<^<?n, Kennedy, Godfrey, Channing, Tucker, Taber. 

€J>M Ungraded Schools — Lowe, Mrs. Borden, Howland, Brownell, 
^"al>er, Pothier, (iodfrey, Tucker, Nortnandin. 

CI}h Training School — Milliken, Kennedy, Pitman, Saver, Channing, 
J^i"owneIl, Miss Winslow, Pothier. 

CJh Truants — (lodfrey, Channing, Tucker, Pothier, Normandin. 
CJn Evening Schools — Kennedy, Lowe, Godfrey, Channing, Tucker, 
I*c>thier, Normandin. 

C^H Afusic — Mrs. Borden, Goilfrey, Shepherd, Brownell, Taber, Pothier, 
^^oi-iiiandin. 

tDn Manual Training — Saver, Miss Winslow, Godfrey, Mrs. Borden, 
T'licrker, Normandin, Kennedy. 

<Dm Examination of Teachers — Miss Winslow. Mrs. Borden, Tucker, 
I^rownell, Milliken. 

<Dh Text-Boohs — Pitman, Kennedy, Milliken, Lowe, Saver, Brownell, 
Frothier, Tucker. 

Oh Expenditures — Howland, Tompkins, Pitman, Lowe, Shepherd, 
Islennedy, Milliken, Taber, Barrows. 

On Howland Fund — Tompkins, Pitman, Shepherd, Kennedy, Taber, 
I lo^%-land, Barrows, Milliken. 
On /?«/«— Taber, Milliken. 
On Pay- Rolls — Tompkins, Howland, Taber. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, 



FOR THE YEAR 1893. 



Report of the Superintendent. 



Co the Srkool C^mimitfee : 

Ladiks and (tENTLEMEX, — I here))v submit to voii my sixth 
niiual Report. It is the thirty-third of the series of Annual 
l^^ports of the Superintendent of Schools of the city. By a 
oto of your Board, this Rv])ort, tojrether with that of the 
HMTetary, is to constitute the Annual Report of the School 
?onnnittee. 

A retrosj>ect of the work of the schools for the yc^ar just 
lo?«ed is in the main satisfactory; certain matters, however, 
oiniected with their administration, es])ecially durinjr the first 
>art of the year, marred somewhat th(^ harmony of affairs. 
5nt I am earnest in the belief that tlie atmosphere has been 
:l(»ared and the schools ])laced on a healthier phme than they 
lavc V>een for some years. Some weakn(»ss(»s have been 
vniodied, and lines of work ])rojected for several years past 
lave l»een put into operation, which will increase the working 
: lower of the schools. 

The principals are exercisinjz; a more efticicMit supervision 
than formerly, tliereby insuring a nearer appioach to unity in 
the work not only of their own schools, but of th(» whole sys- 
tem; and the teachers are striving more than ever to inculcate 

in their pupils the feeling that earnestness of purpose guidecl 
G 



42 superintendent's report. 

by right motives is the cardinal principle of success, whether in 
the limited sphere of the school world or the gveaUn- world 
without. 

Unfortunately the progn^ss of the pupils in two schools lias 
been seriously interfered with by the delay in furnishing the 
school department ade(|uate accommodations; for this, how- 
ever, the school authorities are in no wise responsible. It is 
to be hoped that such a condition of affairs will not occur 
again, and certainly it can be avoided by prompter action in tlie 
future on the part of the city government. 

It is my intention in this Repoii; to set forth more fully the 
lim^s of work followed out in the schools than I have done in 
preceding Reports, and I most respectfully invite your earnest 
attention and that of all our fellow citizens to the same. 

ENROLLMENT AND ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS. 

The gain in enrollment for the year just closed was large as 
shown below ; but it was only two-thirds as much as that of the 
prcH'eding year, which was somewhat abnormal. 

Below is given a comparative statement of the enrollment 
and atteiidaiH^e of pu{)ils in all the schools of the city, the data 
of tlie private and parochial schools being courteously furnished 
l^y the principals and teachers of those sc^hools. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



KnroUnicnt, 

A\cni£je number helon^^^iriij, 
Averui^e dailv attendance. 
Per cent, of attendance. 



Knrollment, 

Avi'rai^e nmnher belf»nLjini^, 
Averai'e daih attendance, 
Per cent, of dailv attendance. 



1893. 


1892. 


Gain. 


n,8S4 


6,713 


171 


h,h4H 


5,379 


164 


4,980 


4,822 


ir4 


90 


89.9 


.1 


AROCIIIAL 


SCHOOLS. 




1898. 


1892. 


I^RS. 


2,922 


3,248 


326 


2,r)91 


2,821 


127 


2,281 


2,430 


149 


85 


80 


.1 



superintexdext's report. 43 

public, private and parochial schools. 

1893. 1892. 

Enrollment, 0,806 9,961 Loss 155 

Average number belonging, 8,237 8,200 Gain 37 

Average daily attendance, 7,267 7,252 Gain 15 

Per cent, of daily attendance, 88 88 

III my report last year I stated that I felt sure a 
mistake was made in the reports of some of the parochial 
schools \n their enrollment. Th(» reports this year confirm 
that opinion, as a disproportionate loss is shown in th(^ enroll- 
ment as conipannl with thci items of ** average number belong- 
ing " and ** average daily attendance." I have no way of test- 
ing the accuracy of the j'eports given me by the privat(» and 
parocliial schools, and estimate* some of th(»in as approximate 
only, but possessing value as sliowing the tn^nd toward that 
form of education. Neitlier do I intend to intimate tlmt 
liny of these returns are given inaccuratcdy for the pur- 
pose of making a good sliowing, for I am sure that sucli is not 
the case. I account for the apparent discr(*imncies in this way : 
that the system (»f keeping the records in some of these schools 
is not worked out so carefully as in the public schools ; in the 
latter great care is exercised in revision of the reports to pre- 
vent errors, and yet they occur. All r(q)orts the past yeaj-, 
however, show that the panxthial schools have lost in numbers, 
while the public schools have gained appreciably. 

While it is to be greatly regn»tted that so many of our fellow 
citizens see fit to withdraw their cliildren from t\w public 
schools for the purposes of education, it is a still greater 
source of regret that many of these schools are far below the 
public schools in their standards of education. Souie of them 
do not answer the conditions of the State laws, even so far as 
their essential organization and instruction are concerned. 
I have directed the attention of vour Committee to this condi- 
tion of affairs before, and I feel that I sliould fail in mv dutv if 
I should let it go unnoticed in this Report. 



44 supbrintendent's report. 

TRUANCY. 

The teachers report 218 cases of truancy for the year, as 
iigainst 197 for the previous one. These figures do not show 
the actual uuiuber of different pupils who have been truants, a^j 
several cases may be chargeable to one individual. On the 
other hand, there are cases uncpiestionably that esca]>e the 
knowledge of th(» teachers, careful as they are. With the 
increased size of tlie city and tlie establishment of parochial 
scliools, the task of ferreting out truants is much greater than 
when the city was smaller and nearly all the pupils were 
enrolled in the publiti schools. The truant officers, however, 
are faithful and vigilant, and few guilty ones escape their atten- 
tion. 

Five conunitmciits wen* made to th<f County Truant school 
at Wal])ole during the year, and there are at j>re8ent nine tru- 
ants in that school from New Bedford. I have not traced the 
career of the pupils who have been sent to the truant school 
after their release, but individual cases have come to mv knowl- 
edge which show the good effect of the school. From personal 
observation I know the school to be well conducted, and a year 
or two spent there by the truants saves many of them from a 
career of criminalitv. 



^1^ 



I'he reports of the truant officers are subjoined. 

REPORT OF HENRY SMITH, TRUANT OFFICER. 

SchooU \ isited, l,4o9 

Absences reported bv teacbers, 763 

Absences witbout permission ot parents, 117 

Second oftences. / 24 

Tliird oftences. U 

Parents notified. 819 

Taken to scbool from street, 20 

Arrests, 

Prosecutions, 8 

On probation, 1 



superintendent's report. 45 

Sentenced to Truant school, 5 

Visits to mills, 47 

Violations of labor law, 4 

REPORT OF GEORGE K. DAMMON, TRUANT OFFICER. 

Families visited, 18 

Cases of absences investigated from evening schools, 717 

Visits to mills and mercantile establishments in relation to labor law, 148 

Violations of labor law, 24 

The work of the tiiiaut oflScers is divided as follows : Mr. 
Smith gives his attention mainly to investigating cases of 
absence from the public day schools and the prosecution of 
truants. He also attends to cases of truancy that occur in the 
parochial schools when requested to do so. He occasionally 
\-isits the mills and mercantile establishments. Mr. Dammon 
gives but part of his time to the duties of tiuant oflScer. lie 
investigates all cases of absence in tlie evening scliools which 
call for investigation. He visits the mills and mercantile 
establishments frequently on matters relating to labor laws; 
the remainder of his time is given to the duties of messenger 
and janitor of the School Committee rooms, the duties of which 
in these days of free text-books and sup})lies are not light. 

EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES. 

In my Report last year I directed the attention of the 
>cliool Board to the fact that there were a number of schools 
in the city that had not been approved by the Board, and that 
pupils from those schools applying for ceilificates to work were 
not entitled to them under the statutes of the State. Although 
a special committee was appointed by tlie Board to consider 
the matter no definite action has b(?en taken, and your Superin- 
tendent IS still embaiTassed by existing conditions in issuing 
t'ertificates. I hope this vexing ({uestion will receive the early 
attention of the Boai-d. 



46 superintendent's report. 

The following statistics will give some idea of the demands 
made upon the Superintendent's ofiSce during tlie year iu 
this one matter alone. But they fail to give a complete knowl- 
edge. Many certificates are refused, and the time rccjuired in 
examining the applications and explaining the reasons for rcfiisal 
is not of slight moment. 



Number of certificates issued, 








(m 


For the first time, 








627 




Duplicate certificates, 
Birthplace of those to h 


'hom certificates were issued : 


17 


(U4 


United States, 








221 




Canada, 








194 




England, 
Western Islands, 








103 
70 




Germany, 








14 




Ireland, 








8 




Scotland, 








4 




Russia, 








3 




Austria, 








3 




Sweden, 








2 




Prince Edward's Island, 








1 




France, 








1 




Wales, 








1 




Italy, 
Portugal, 








1 
1 


627 


244 parents could not 


sign 


their 


names. 







THE COST OF SCHOOLS. 

In speaking of the education of the people Daniel Webster 
said : "We regard it as a wise and liberal system of police, by 
whicli property, and life, and the peace of society are secured.*' 
Anotlier lias said: "It is not so much to the wisdom of Legis- 
lature's, or an enlightened social organization, as to skill in pro 
ductivc arts, tbat States iu future must look for their supremacy. 
Education is the great instrument which determines this excel- 
lence." 

In accordance with these ideas the public scliools of this 
coimtry have been developed, and within the last thirty years 



superintendent's report. 47 

• 

the sum i-aised for their maintenance has increased several hun- 
dred fold. The questions that are now being frequently raised 
by tax-payers, namely : why the great proportional increase in 
the cost of maintaining the schools over that of thirty, or even 
twenty years ago ? and the other, is not the support of the 
scliools becoming a burden, which the results do not justify ? 
iire both answered in a large measure by the words of those 
whom 1 have quoted. 

To answer more explicitly, however, the first of these ques- 
tions, I would say that the increase in cost is caused by 
the changed condition of life, which throws greater responsi- 
l)ilities upon the schools. Whether the support of the schools 
is becorainjr a burden grievous to bear and unjustifiable is a 
^nore ^ieriou.s question, and one which is mucli more diflS- 
^•ult to answer. I do not think so, but 1 am not supposed to 
^)e an unbiased judge. Neither do I think that any candid and 
'thoughtful person will upon reflection come to an adverse con- 
<:hision, certainly not if he accepts the statement which would 
Ije hard to refute, that the supremacy of States in the future 
irill depend upon the skill of the citizens in tlie productive arts, 
5iud tliat education gives this skill. Indeed, it is a well 
iwcepted principle of political economy that intelligent labor 
h tlie great wealth producing force of a country. The 
schools are engaged in the production of such labor, and 
surely the source of wealth should reap the benefits of the 
wealth it produces. Massachusetts, the most liberal of states 
in her school expenditures, is one of the wealthiest in spite of 
lier natural disadvantages, avowedly due to the intelligence of 
her citizens. 

If it is granted, however, that large exjienditures are justified 
for the schools, it is none the less true that there may be 
'^aste in administering the fund appropriated for their support 
*^v tlie division of too much of it into the least important 
^ihannels. Those who furnish the money through taxation are 
justified in scrutinizing most carefully tlie expenditures of tho.se 



48 supkbintendbnt's report. 

taxes, and have a right to demand that the money expended 
shall be used in a manner that will give the best results. Too 
often there aie extravagant exjienditures for the material side 
of tiie schools, which result in the dwarfing of the educative, tht* 
important side. Ex|>ensive school houses are erected when le5> 
costly buildings would provide as well for the health and com- 
fort of the pupils and at the same time not offend good taste. 
In this way a debt is created which is liable to react to the 
injury of the schools. It is far l3ctter, provided a city can 
make lavish exp<»nditures, to surround the school houses of less 
expensive kind, with extensive play-grounds and play-sheds for 
th(j pupils in inclement weather, than to erect costly buildings on 
unsuitable and small lots, which in their structure gratify the 
[>ride of the architect, rather than subserve the best interests 
of the schools. Imposing and ornate school houses, costly 
furniture and fixtures are all well enough if a city can affoni 
them, but few cities can. 

Tlie highest inttn-ests of the schools are sub8er\*ed when 
school houses are ]>rovided wliich are located in pleasant and 
healtliful localities, surrounded hy sufficient grounds to admit 
of an abundance of sunlight and air; school houses that are 
well heated and ventilated, and furnished ])rimarily for the 
physical well-being of the pupils and teachers; where there is 
such su]>ervision as will ensure well planned courses of study 
and wise methods in applying them ; but more important than 
all, wlicn they arc equi])ped with good teachers, educated and 
trained to do that highest and noblest work, the unfolding and 
(lrv(»loping the minds and characters of the young. 

Uiifortmiatc^lv for the schools when retrenchment is neces- 
sary, the first tiling that is usually thought of is the reduction of 
the tcaclHn-s' salaries. Instead of being the first, it Bhonid be 
the last means of reduction. Low salaries can now command 
only iuetficient te.acluM's and teaching ; of what use, may I ask, 
arc all the ex]>ensivc school houses and appliances if tlie teach- 
ing is to be of inferior (juality ? It would be well if the science 



superintendent's report. 49 

of schiHtl econ^ymy was better understood, not only by the jiublic 
at lai-ge, but by those who are called upon to administer schools. 

To narrow the subject to our o\^Tfi system of schools, and to 
in(|uire whether the schools of New Bedford are costing? more 
than they should — as some of our citizens appear to believe — 
I invite attention first to a few facts and figures taken from the 
Report of the State Board of Education for 1891-2, (at the 
time of writing this the Report for 1892-3 was not published) 
regarding ( 1 ) the amount appropriated by the different cities 
and towns for school purposes for each child between the ages 
of five and fifteen years residing within their limits; and 
(2) the percentage of taxable property appropriated for sc^hool 
purposes in the difiFerent cities and towns of the State. 

In the first list New Bedford ranks 161, of the 351 cities 
and towns in tlie State. The year befon* lier rank was 98, 
having fallen 63 in the list in one year. As compared with 
the cities of the State the following cities appropriate more : 
Newton, Medford, Waltham, Somerville, Springfield, Cambridge, 
Boston, Maiden, Lynn, Taunton, Worcester, Gloucester, Salem, 
Chelsea, Lowell, Brockton, Northampton, Haverhill, Marl- 
borough, Quincy, Everett, Fitchburg, 22, and but seven cities 
less. 

In the second list, as to the percentiigc* of taxable property 

appropriated to the support of the schools, New Bedford ranks 

285 of the 351 cities and towns in the State*. The v(»ar before 

her rank was 284, having fallen oiki! in the list in one year. 

Expressed in mills and hundredths of mills her appropriation 

was 2.70 mills on her valuation. Thi* following cities a])pro- 

priated more: Marlborough, Gloucester, Woburn, Pittstield, 

Taunton, Quincy, Medford, Brockton, Northampton, ilalden, 

^H^merville, Waltham, Chelsea, Fitchburg, Holyoke, Everett, 

Haverhill, Salem, Cambridge, Worcester. Newton, Lowell, 

Fall River, Lynn, Chicopee, Lawrence, SpringHeld. 27, and 

but two cities less. 

i 



50 superintendent's report. 

Altliough it is not to be inferred from the above that New 
Bedford is parsimonious in her appropriations for schools, it 
must be sufficient evidence to any fair minded pei'son, that as 
compared with her sister cities in this fair Commonwealth, she 
is furnishing a far smaller proportional part of the money 
raised by taxation than the great majority for the education of 
her youth. In addition it may he said that she is expending 
less per pupil on those who attend the schools than a number 
of cities of proportionate wealth in the State. In the light of 
what has been shown the financial stringency in city affairs can 
scarcely be attributed to the expenditures for schools. 

This city cannot afford to reduce her appropriations for the 
schools. The salaries now pai<l are but the average paid in 
cities where the expense of living is the same ; as many pupils 
arc now apportioned to a teacher as is conducive to the health 
and advancement of the pupils ; no more books, supplies, and 
apparatus are now furnished the schools, even with the aid of 
tlie Sylvia Ann Ilowland fund, than the schools require for 
good work ; only such additions to tlie school buildings, and 
r(»pairs upon the same are made as are required to accommodate 
tlie increased number of pupils and keep the buildings in proper 
order. If these stiitoments are true, and I believe thev will 
b(Mir the closest investigation, liow can the exjienditures for 
schools be reduced without striking at their very life ? New 
Bedford can no more afford to belittle her public school system 
tliaii slie can afford to dec^y her great and growing industries, 
both of which contrilnite their due measure to her fair name 
and ])rosperity. Any appreciable reduction in the school 
ap]»rnjniation will result in a loss of many of our best 
toavh(»rs. for the demand ff)r trained and experienced teachers 
is far greater than the sup])ly ; a large reduction will result 
not only in retarding tlie progress of the schools, but in a dis- 
organization of the system which has been so carefully built 
ui> bv nnieh thonirht and lai»or. 

1 •■ ■' 



supebintendent's report. 51 

It remains only to be said that the cost per pupil iu our 
schools for the year 1893 was substantially less than for 1892, 
brought about by a careful adjustment of pupils to each 
teacher. This result was secured, too, in face of the fact that 
a cooking school was added and in operation the last sixteen 
weeks of the year, and several salaries were increased in order 
to retain several teachers, whose services are valuable to the 
city, and who were persistently sought for by a neighboring 
city. 

TEACHERS. 

Good teachers make good schools ; nothing else can. And 
it means much to be a good teacher. A teacher may be a 
failure though he posess a broad education ; lie may be a failure 
with professional training added to his knowledge. The 
power to control and the ability to stimulate and draw forth 
the best that is in others are important requisites for the 
teacher. To crown all these he must have a genuine interest 
in his work and in those whom he is to instruct, if his influence 
is to be strong and lasting. 

One of the most weakening and positively harmful elements 
in any system of schools is the presence in it of teachers wlio 
are not thoroughly in earnest. It is not necessary that one wlio 
enters the teaching profession should have done so from choice 
to bring to it the right spirit. But it is necessary that he should 
possess a character of such mould that he will strive to do his 
duty at all times and find a pleasure in so doing, not a time- 
server who is satisfied with anv kind of work that he thinks will 
l)e accepted. Teaching is not an easy task in these days, noi- 
ls it a very remunerative one; but it is an honorable and most 
resjmnsible one. It certainly is not the sphere for those whose 
iuterest in their work does not extend bevond the school room 
door, or for those who consider their dntv done when tliev f'ol- 
low in a routine method the daily progrannne. Teaeheis wlio 
are to be successful in the best meaning of the term nuist iiave 



52 superintendent's report. 

noble ideals; tliey deal with souls as well as intellects and 
their own standards are reflected in their pupils. 

It gives me i)lcasure to testify to the high intelligence of the 
corps of tea(;hers in the city as a body, and the earnest purj)ose 
that actuates most of them. There are a few, however, who 
have not laid a good foundation for their calling, and I fear do 
not give the time to study and j)reparation necessary to keep 
in touch with modern thought, or to make their teacliing at all 
broad. There are a few also who feel that their lot is a hard 
one ; who are inclined to pronmlgate the idea that their lives 
arc made a burden by their occupation. 

I am free to admit that their calling has its peculiiu* trials : 
and for those who dislike work, or who cannot control them- 
selves or others, it is jiroductive of unrest and worry, and is 
exhausting. Notwithstanding the wear and tear of the life, 
however, statistics show that teachers are as long lived jui? those 
of any profession. Those who are fitted by nature and 
preparation for the profession have but little cause for com- 
phiint. Those who are constantly complaining are usually in- 
efficient, and should seek some more congenial occupation. 
Thev have no rijrht to inflict themselves and their inefficienev 
on the suffering (*hildren. Some teachers appear to forget that 
more time is given for rest and recreation in their business 
than in almost any other. With 200 school days as the maxi- 
mum for work there remains 1G9 for recreation and recupera- 
tion. There; are few other countries which rank high in educa- 
tional matters, where less preparation is required of teachers 
for their profession, or whose school hours are not longer. 

Several important changes have occurred in the corj)s during 
the |)ast yeai*. Mr. Ray Greene Haling, the successful princi- 
pal of the Hiii^h sc^hool for some years, resigned to accept the 
|»rinei|)alshi|) of the Englisli Higli scliool, Cambridge, Ma.*<s. 
Mr. i\ K. K. Mosher, for manv vears at the head of the Parker 
Street (Jrannnar school, in which position he achieved success, 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



53 



rew to engage in private sdiool work. Mr. Huling was 
»ded by Mr. Charles Sturtevant Moore, a graduate of Har- 
3ollege, and Mr. Mosher by Mr. Frank J. Heavens, a grad- 
)f Amherst. Both gentlemen came to us with the prestige 
:.tering success, and have entered upon their duties in a 
?r that is full of promise for the best results. 

the appointments, resignations, and transfers for the year 
)ted below: 

APPOINTMENTS. 



s Sturtevant Moore, 

s J. Heavens, 

McCov, 

a F. Winslow, 

M. Briggs, 

E. Footman, 
L. Hunt, 

L. Gartland, 
tie E. Bonnev, 
V. Richardson, 
i. McAuliffe, 

T. Thomas, 
/. Corish, 
ce A. Poole, 
Greenwood, 
[oore, 
SV. Russell, 



Principal, High school. 

Principal, Parker Street Grammar school. 

Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 

Parker Street Grammar school. 

I. W. Benjamin Primary school. 

Principal, S. A. Howland Primary school. 

I. VV. Benjamin Primary school. 

I. W. Benjamin Primary school. 

Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 

Cedar Grove Street Grammar school. 

Clark's Point school. 

Rockdale school. 

Training school. 

Training school. 

Cooking teacher. 

Training school. 

Training school. 



RESIGNATIONS. 



reene Huling, 
I. Hincklev, 
s E. E. Mosher, 
V. Levmunion, 
r Commerford, 
W. Lucas, 
L. Den ham, 
E. Bralev, 
I F. ICeene, 



Principal, High school. 
Middle Street Grammar school. 
Principal, Parker Street Gnininiar school. 
Cedar Grove Street Grammar school. 
Principal, William Street Primary school. 
Acushnet Avenue Priniarv school. 
I. W. Benjamin school. 
North school. 
Rockdale school. 



54 



superintexdent's report. 



Agnes J. Dunlap, 
Nancy H. Brooks, 
May L. Pettey, 
Sara M. Hatch, 



Helen Ring. 
Mary W. Leymunion, 
Lizzie E. Omev, 
Elizabeth Bennett, 
Charlotte M. Allen, 
Lizzie M. Briggs, 
Annie L. Brownell, 
Helen J. Kirk, 
Sarah E. Kirx^in, 
Annie M. King, 
Marv C. Barstow, 
Kate Sweet, 
Emma L. Gartland, 
Dora A. DeWolf, 
Ruth E. Pease, 



ABSENT ON LEAVE. 

Middle Street Grammar school. 
Fifth Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 

TRANSFERS. 

from Parker Street to Middle Street, 
from Parker Street to Cedar Grove Street 
from Parker Street to Cedar Grove Street, 
from Thompson Street to Acushnet Ave. 
from Thompson Street to \. W. Benjamin, 
from I. W. Benjamin to Thompson Street- 
from L W. Benjamin to Thompson Street, 
from I. W. Benjamin to William Street, 
from Acushnet Avenue to L VV. Benjamin, 
from Harrington to Acushnet Avenue, 
from I. W. Benjamin to Dartmouth Street, 
from North Mill to Cedar Grove Street, 
from Clark's Point to \. W. Benjamin, 
from Harrington to I. W. Benjamin, 
from Harrington to Cedar Grove Street. 



Agnes E. Braley, 
Alice P. Terrv, 



TEMPORARY ASSISTANTS. 

North school. 
Rockdale school. 



THE HARRINGTON TRAINING SCHOOL FOR 

TEACHERS. 

This school was organized and went into opemtion in Se])- 
teniher, 1889. Since that time 50 teachers have graduated 
from the school, and liave been a})pointed to the regular teach- 
in<j^ corps of tlio city. Forty-three of them are now in service. 
None of those wlio liavc i*esigned after appointment to the 
icguhir corps liave Ikjcii retpiested to do so for inefficiency. 
This rccoid is surely an excellent one. Although not all 
of the ♦graduates arc achieving the highest success, the miyority 
of them arc (juiti^ efficient, and the value of the training 
obtained in tin; school is apparent in every case. Had this 
school not l)ecn founded it would have been necessarv to fill 



superintendent's report. 55 

the majority of positions held by them with non-resident 
teacliers, or to appoint to those places persons without any 
tniiiiing whatsoever for teaching. The latter course would 
have been fatal to the progress of the schools. 

During the year both the principal and vice-princii)al were 
ofiered lui*ger salaries to take charge of a similar school 
organized in a neighboring city. In order to retain their ser- 
vices the School Board raised their salaries. This action in 
the interest of good schools should meet with the commenda- 
tion of our citizens. 

There remains but little to be added to what has been stated 

in previous Reports. The work of tlie school continues very 

satisfactory, ))oth in its Normal Department and its n^gular 

.s<*ho<)l work. If those who enter the school as pupil-teachers 

^rought with them more of the sj)irit that should actuate those 

who choose teaching for their profession, the influence of the 

.sc1h>o1 would be broadened, and its work made still more 

oftectivc. There exists at times just cause for criticism in the 

nientul attitude assumed toward the work by some of those 

who (»nter the school. 

COl-RSE OF STUDY, HARRINGTON TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Tcxt-Book Used. 

White's Elements of 
Pedaj^oj^v. 

Com pa V re. 





Sl'B 


-JirXIOR CLASS. 


Nome of Study. 




Time Given, 


pRvchologv, ) 

Pedagogy, ) 

History of Pedagogy. 

School Laws of Massachusetts. 


30 hours. 

30 hours. 
10 hours. 


School Management, 
Arithmetic, 




10 hours. 
00 hours. 


(ieography, 
Reading, 
Unguage, 
Writing, 
Nature Study, 




V)0 hours. 
48 hours. 
53 hours. 
15 hours. 
15 hours. 


Phvulologv, 
Music. 




5 liours. 
20 hours. 


l^rawin^. 




20 hours. 



56 



superintendent's report. 



During the Junior and Senior terms the pupil-teachei-s recite 
four hours a week, if these classes are full enough to allow the 
withdrawal of the teachers from the rooms during the recita- 
tion period. 

In these recitations the pupil-teachers give teaching exer- 
cises, usually to classes of children, who are dismissed at th<» 
close of the exercise. Then follow criticisms, discussion, anc\ 
suggestions concerning the teacher's methods of teaching and 
controlling the class. Often teachers bring up for discussion 
or counsel points that have troubled them in the cla^ss room. 



STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 189.3. 

Number of pupil-teachers enrolled during the year, 

Number of pupil-teachers graduated in February, 

Number ot pupil-teachers graduated in June, 

Number of pupil-teachers admitted in February, 

Number of pupil-teachers admitted in September, 

Number of pupil-teachers resigned, 

Average number of pupil-teachers belonging. 

Number of assistant teachers, 

Number of days substituting by pupil-teachers. 

Number of days other absence of pupil-teachers. 



2 
S 
1 

10 
4 

13 
5 
2151 
122 > 



Emma I^ouise Gartland. 



GRADUATES. 

FEBRIARY, 1893. 



Caroline Elizabeth Bonnev 



Julia Winifred Corish. 
Julia Arnold Hunt. 
Kate Moore. 
Florence Ashlev Poole 



JINK, 1893. 



Alice Anne Richardson. 
(9 race Worthing Russell. 
Lillian Turner Thomas. 
Ruth May Tripp. 



(iENERAL STATISTICS. 

W]u)le number of pupil-teachers enrolled since the establishment of 

the Training school. 
Number of pupil-teachers in the school, January, 1894, 
Number of pupil-teachers graduated from the school, 



7V 
11 



RITPERINTEN dent's REPORT. 57 

Number of pupil-teacherR who have rcRigned on account of unMitis- 

factory work, H 

Number of pupil-teachers who have resigned for other cauKes. 6 

Number of graduates now teaching in New Bedford, 43 

Number of graduates who have married, 4 

Number resigned to study for special higher work, 2 

THE CURRICULUM. 

That public opinion is unilerji;oing a chanji^e in regard to the 

eour.sc of instruction that sliould be given to j)upils of the 

t*leinentarv schools is noticeable to even the most casual ob- 

server. The three R's while still holding sway to a greater 

or l<*s?* degree, have long since been supj>leinented in school 

<'ourses by grammar, geograj)liy, history, nnisic, and drawing. 

Aloro recently, other branches have found recognition in many 

>ii'ln><>Ls — as natural history, physiology, elementary jihysics, 

ami the manual arts in the form of sewing, cooking, and wood 

uiid metal working. While in the past, language tea(;hing in 

the.se schools has been confined to the viMinuMilar, and th(^ 

Hiatheniatical instruction to that furnished l)y arithmetic, it is 

How urged strongly by many of the most prominent educators 

that Latin and one modern language at l(»ast should be made 

c'lective in the last years of the grammar course ; also that 

inventional geometry and algebra should supplement the work 

in arithmetic at least during the last year of th(» grannnar 

sehools. Others desire the introduction of such brandies as 

will meet their own peculiar ideas; thos(j enumerated are, 

however, the principal ones that hav(^ so far hreu accepted, or 

are deemed most worthv of consideration by school authoii- 

ties. 

It is unquestionably true that some of tlie so-called essiMi- 

tials, as arithmetic, grammar, and geography have been given 

undue prominence in the j)ast in the educational seiieme, and 

liave been overrated as to their educative and disciplinary 

value. When we consider the l)arrenness of the residts that 
8 



58 superintendent's report. 

have been produced by years of instruction in these branches 
in the schools, it is difficult to argue against their abridgment 
for the purpose of introducing other branches that will serve 
better for purposes of mental training, and a knowledge of 
wliich will also be of greater practical value. 

But this broadening of the curriculum means more than 
simply placing other branches in th(j course. It means a com- 
plete revolution in the organization and administration of the 
school system. Departmental and special instruction must 
hereafter supersede to a large extent the custom that has hith- 
erto prevailed of one teacher conducting all the various 
branches with a class. With the three R's as the extent of 
the teaching, the old method was feasible. When a few other 
branches were added, the teaching became less sound ; when 
music and drawing were added, specialization in instruction 
became a necessity; with the introduction of sewing, cook- 
ing, wood and metal working, and physical training, special 
toacluirs for each were added. The departmental system is 
fairly under way, and if it is not to become too expensiv'e and 
burdensome, tlic regular corps of teachers must be broken up 
into def)artmental groups also, that efficiency of teaching at the 
least cost may be secured. 

Tlie departmental metliod of teadiing has already been ad- 
vocatcMl for thi^ grammar schools of Boston by the Board of 
Supervisors, and will in all prol)ability be tried there. This 
system will have its disadvantages, but the system is a nei*es- 
sitv witli the diversitv of studies that are even now engrafted 
upon the course of study in those schools that are considered 
the best. The teachers of tlie present are certainly not pre- 
pared to teach witli any hope of leasonalile success the multi- 
plicity of branches which no\v form a part of a modern cur- 
riculum. Nor is it reasonable to expect that any Imdy of 
teacheis can be e(hicate(l and trained to teach them all well. 
In the in(hi.>trial arts, in tlie libeial jirofessions, and in the 



superintendent's report. 59 

eacbing force of the secondary sciiools and colleges, special- 
zation of work has become an accei)ted fact ; it will soon per- 
vade the elementary schools j)er force. 

While the School Department of New Bedford has not been 
cxtrenudy rdxlical in adopting innovations in the school cur- 
ricnlnni, neither has it been so conservative that it has remained 
indifferent to the changes that modern thought has wrought in 
the teaching in the schools. Music and drawing have been a j)art 
of the school course here for many years ; sewing long since 
k»canic a part of the curriculum ; nature study and cooking 
have recently bec^ome a j)art of the regular instruction, while 
the manual tniining school but awaits an instructor to be 
:>laccd in operation. My worthy predecessor was a pioneer 
n eliminating mudi of the extraneous matter from the instruc- 
ion in arithmetic, geograj)hy, and English grammar. Obser- 
ational geometry and some inventional have long formed a 
mrt of the regular instruction in the primary and grannnar 
rrudes. While nothing as yet has been attempted in the ele- 
nentary schools in demonstrative geometry or algebra, and no 
itteinpt lH»en made to incorporate the teaching of Latin or a 
iioileni language uj)on the grammar course, those places are 
lacing watched with interest in which this has been done with 
the intention of profiting by their experience if the movement 
is successful. 

I shall attempt to outline somewhat briefly the line of in- 
struction which is now being followed, especially in our (ele- 
mentary schools, that it may be better understood by those who 
are interested, and that itmav invoke; such frien<llv criticism as 
will tend to remedy its weaknesses. 

LAN(iUA(iE. 

Under the head of language is included composition, gram- 
mar, reading, and s))elling, altln)ugh nuich of the direct lan- 
guage instruction is given in connection with the nature study, 
geography, and history. 



60 superintendent's report. 

Composition and Grammar — The aim from the l^eginning i? 
to create ideas in tlie pupils' minds, and to guide them in ex- 
pressing these ideas in proper form. At first, objects and pic- 
tures are placed before the pupils. They are led to obsene 
these objects and to give to the teachers the results of their 
observations. By skillful (juestioning on the part of the teach- 
ers, and suggestions, they are aided in their observations and 
led to proper forms of expression. Oral expression is fol- 
lowed by the written forms as soon as the pupils are able io 
write. When their ages permit, their observations of things 
outside the school room and the life that surrounds them are 
made the basis of nmch of the work. Stories are told by the 
teachers and reproduced orally and in written form by the pu- 
pils. Reproductions are also made by the pupils of their read- 
ing lessons, and lessons in natural history, geography, q\c. 
They are introduced to tlie mechanical forms of expression, 
such as the marks of punctuation and ca]>italization, as well a*? 
to the arbitrary forms of grammatical expression: (1) by 
copying correct forms }>laced on the blackboards or slips of 
j)aper; (2) as they advance in grade, by the study of correct 
forms in language books. The study of technical grammar 
begins with the seventh year of school. The work of this year 
in grammar is confined to distinguishing the forms of the parts 
of speech, a I'ecognition of sentences in their four fonns, the 
lelation of subject and predicate in the sentence, and the in- 
sjieetion of the two principal fonns of modifiers — adjective 
and adverbial. During the next two years sentences distin- 
guished as simple, eoniplex, and compound are considered, the 
properties of the parts of speech are studied, also the rela- 
tions of the vaiions parts of speech in the sentence. The 
analysis of sentences in their simple forms receive some atten- 
tion, and the application of the ordinary principles and rules 
of syntax ai"e taught. Throughout all grades, composition 
work in vajied roiins, giaded to the capacity of tlie pupils, is 



superintendent's report. 61 

systematically carried on, and the memorizing of clioice selec- 
tions of prose and poetry. I^etter writing and conventional 
forms of written intercourse receive their proper share of at- 
tention. In brief, the teachers strive throughout the course in 
the elementary schools, ( 1 ) to teach ^he pupils to observe for 
themselves and to give expression to their observations ; (2) 
to exercise their imaginative powers; (3) to strengthen their 
memory and to train their reason and judgment. This work 
in language and gi-ammar in the lower schools is supplemented 
l>y a four years coui-se in English in the High school, required 
of every pupil, while the courses in the classics and modern 
lan^u^es there broaden still further the language study of the 
schools. 

Reading — This, one of the three R's, is as important a 
hi-anch of study today as in the days of our forefathers, and 
must remain so until the end. But modern ideas as to the 
methods of teaching it have changed greatly. The wonder is 
that the old ideas should have prevailed so loni?, and the fact 
that they did remain unchanged so long is a sad conmientary 
on the teaching of the past. At first objects with which 
young children are more or less familiar are brou^rht to their 
attention, and the teacher calls to her aid toys and pictures. 
The teacher presents the objects to the pupils ; tlie name is 
iriven by some pupil, or by the teacher, if no one in the class 
can do so, and the word is written upon the board. The pu- 
pils are taught that this written symbol represents the object. 
They are questioned, it may be, upon tlie color of the object 
pres^ented, or its form, or what it can do, or what can be done 
with it, and their answers are written upon the l^oard ; for tlie 
l>uj)iis are introduced at once to tlie sentence, tlie unit of 
thought. In a short while they acquire quite an extended vo- 
^•aljulary which they read at sight, varying from 150 to 300 
words in the first five months, according to tlu? skill of tlie 
teacher and amount of time given daily. Both the script and 
printed forms are used upon the board by the teachers, usually 



62 superintendent's report. 

the script form as admitting of more rapid work. The transi- 
tion to the printed forms is made by the aid of ehaits at tlit* 
end of the first four montlis. Reading books are soon placcnl 
in the liands of the pupils and the easier pieces of sevenvl finst 
readers are read by them at the close of the first year at 
scliool. At the end of the third year at school, the pupils aiv 
able to read understandingly and with a fair degree of v\- 
l)ression composition embracing (juite a wide range of ordinary 
words. While the importance of good oi*al rendering is recojr- 
nized, it is constantly emphasized that the chief aim of the 
teachers should be to have the pupils comprehend the subject 
matter read. Silent reading is done by the jmpils as well as 
reading aloud, and tests of progress are made hy requirinir 
them frequently to i(»nder at sight something which they have 
not read before. 

But the cliange in the methods of teaching reading is no 
greater tluin the change in the kind of reading matter that is 
used. The regular reading books, so called, have been super- 
seded to a great extent by a line of books which answer more 
fully the ])urposes of tlie instruction in this branch. The read- 
ing books of tlie old type have been supplanted to a large ex- 
tent by more suitable ones. Recognizing that the pupils should 
read such matter as will giv^e them useful information, or will 
create in tliem a good literary taste, books are l)eing gi-adualK 
selected and j)laced in the grammar and primary grades for 
these purposes. Tlie selcjction of books is made in rehition to 
four general lines : (1) those relating to natural history: (2) 
those relating to geography; (3) those relating to United 
States history; (4) those of literary merit. In the primary 
grades, in addition to a variety of regular readers, are placed 
these books : Wood s Natural History Readers, Geography for 
Young Folks, Robinson (^rusoe in One Syllabic, Seven Little 
Sistrrs, Kach and All, King's Picturesque Geograpliy, Hans 
Audeiscn's Fairy Tales adapted to Third Reader gi*ade, Sea- 
side and Waysidt' No. 1. 



superintendent's report. 63 

In the grammar grades, in addition to the regular readers, 
aro the following : In the lowest grade, fifth year — The Health 
Primer, Our World No. 1, Seaside and Wayside No. 2, Child's 
Book of Nature. In the sixth year — Scribner's Geographical 
R<»ador, Eggleston's Smaller U. S. History, Seaside and Way- 
side No. 3. In the seventh year — Higginson's U. S. History, 
Hawthorne's Grandfather's Chair, Kingsley's Water Babies. 
In the eighth year — Ballou's Footprints of Travel, Hawthorne's 
Tanglewood Tales, Whittier's Snow Bound. In the ninth 
year — Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare, Longfellow Leaflets, 
Quentin Durward, McKenzie's America, Seven British Classics. 
To broaden still further the list, books in sets of tlnee have 
beiMi provided for sight reading, as follows : Washington Li- 
ving's Sketch Book, Lincoln's Gettysburg, Hans Brinkcr, Black 
Beauty, Little Men, Blue Jackets of 1776, Blue Jackets of 
1812, Blue Jackets of 1861, King of tlie Golden River, 
Church's Old World Stories, Little Flower People, Little Lord 
Fauntleroy, Heroic Ballads, At the Back of the North AVind, 
Stories of Industry, World at Home — Europe, World at Home; — 
The World, Peasant and Prince, Prince and Pauper, Aral)ian 
Nights, Vicar of Wakefield. 

By furnishing l)ooks in sets of three, one for the teacher, one 
tor the pupil reading, and the other for the pupil next in turn, 
}i great variety of good reading matter is secured at a mini- 
mum cost. While the list of Heading books is not the best 
perhaps that could now be selected, it has grown through the 
years, and is in the main good. It cei-tainly is accom])lishing 
that which was not possible with the old line of readers. 

Spelling — Spelling is taught chiefly by requiring words to 
l)e written from dictation. The association of the correct 
pronunciation of each word with its written form is taught of 
course. But as the use of words in aftc^i- life, so far as it re- 
lates to their spelling is mainly in their written form, children 
should become so familiar with writing the ordinary vocabulary 
of life that they will write -it corrertly without icfh^ction. 



64 superintendent's report. 

While ispelling books are in use in the schools, s|)eirnig i^ 
taught to a large extent through the written language work 
done in eonneetion with all the branches, it being niH'essary for 
the pujnls to possess a vocabulary of considerable range to 
express themselves intelligil»ly on the many subjects now 
taught. 

MATHEMATICS. 




Arithmetic is the main source of mathematical studv l)elo 
the High school. It is true that something is done with geoiv^- 
etry in connection witli form study and drawing and with tl ■»-^' 
treatment of mensuration in arithmetic, but the work in th 
subject is incidental and not sufficiently definite. Algebra ht 
not yet found lodgment in the course. A development of tl: 
work along the hues of com^rctc geometry and elementary a 
gebra, with still greater restrictions phiced on the amount r 
arithmetic, would strengthen the course both for pupils wh 
complete thcnr education in the grammar schools and thos 
who coiitinui* their studies in the High school. 

Arithiu(»tic — Some years ago, much of the subject matte -^^*^ 
embraced in the ordinary grammar school arithmetic was elini^- *" 
inatcd from the work of the elementary schools and relegatec:^:^^ 
to the Higli school. Tliere this subject is taught one period c^^ 
week foi- tlic four years. The results that accrue from X\\C^^^ 
study of this subject, pursued as it is for a number of yearj 
by nearly all ])upils in the schools throughout the country, have 
becMi so unsatisfactorv that serious reflection has been cast iit 
these later days upon the estimation hitherto placed upon it as=- 
a useful and discii)liiuiry study. That it will occupy a posi- 
tion of nmcli less imjiortance in school courses than it has in 
the past is unquestionably true. 

The course in the schools is substantially as follows : In 
the first four years numbers ai-e develo|>ed from 1 to 144 by the 
foui-process method and obje(*tively. Perception of the sim- 
ple fractional forms is taught from the beginning with their 



superintendeiit's report. 65 

usi; a8 tlie work j)rogre88e8. Units of United States money, 
of liquid niea.siire, dry measure, avoirdupois weight, and time 
measure^ with their relations, are presenteil. In applied nuni- 
!>or, actual measures are used when possible. Numbers con- 
taining integers of two |)eriods and decimals of three orders 
an* written and read. In the work in multiplication and di- 
vision th(? nudtiples or divisors are integers of either one or 
two figures, not 'larger. Roman numerals from 1 to 200 are 
taught, also the symbols for 500 and 1000. No text-books are 
placcMl in the hands of the pupils until the fifth year, or lowest 
jrramniar grade. I feeb however, that the pupils (*ould use a 
text-book to advantage during the fourth y(»ar, j)erhaj)s during 
tin' third vear, and much valuable time which is now consumed 
in the pre[>aration of class work, gaine<l for other pin-jioscs. 

In the grammar grades an elennmtary arithmeti<r is used the 
first two years, followed by a more advanccnl one in the suc- 
tMHMling three. In the granunar course the lin<\s of work i)c- 
«run in primary grades iivo (*ontinued, with new subjects added 
i'aoh vear. Short dailv oral drills witl» small nuTnb<»rs are 
i-ontinued throughout the course. All work is mad(» as objec- 
tive as possible. The following sulijects given in most of the 
•Lrninunar school arithmetics have been eliminated from the 
<"ourse, and tak(*n. if tsiken at all in th(» s(!hools, in the High 
school by those who continue tlnnr course tluM-c : The nnMuor- 
izing of rules and abstract j)rincipl(»s as given in text-ljooks; 
nearly all that is contained under tin* heading, *' Properties of 
Numl>ers''; the more difficult ])rol)lenis in coninion fractions; 
4'irculating decimals; the Metric system; addition, subtraction, 
iiui]ti|dication, and division of conijjound numbers; Metric 
i'<|uivalents ; exact interest and probl(»rns in interest, so-called: 
partial payments; comj)ound interest; (Mpiation of payments: 
compound proportion; cube root. exc(»pt by inspe<*tic)n ; all un- 
♦lerthe head of mensuration except as applicMJ to tlu' nieasnre- 
iwont of surfaces, as land, lum])er, flooring, and plastering, and 

9 



66 superintendent's report. 

finding tlie area of quadrilaterals, triangles, and circles ; pro- 
gression; alligation. 

While much has been eliminated as shown, I have no doubt 
but the course could be cut down still more, and the time of 
the j)upils who are to leave school at the end of the grammar 
school course be more profitably given to other studies. 

In the High school this subject, as sUited before, is taken 
once a week by the pupils for the four years. Judging from 
the results obtained from its study there, I am inclined to be- 
lieve that this continuous course is not beneficial. The pupils 
tire of the study. If it were dropped from the course for the 
first two y(»ars and taken up again in the third year afresh, 
after the pupils had taken algel)ra and demonstrative geom- 
etry, they would undertake its study with a new i-elish and a 
fuller com{)rehension. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

The instruction in geogi*a])hy may be made broad and 
exceedingly inter(^sting to pupils : Imt too frequently it degener- 
ate's into a memorizing of facts, many of which are unimport- 
ant, and wliich fade from the minds of the learners without 
adding anytliing to their mental strength or giving them any 
idea of the true scope and usefulness of the study. It is too 
apt to become a study of words and sentenccis rather than a 
stmiy of nature and a logical dcMluc.tion of cause and eflFect. 

A few years ago th(» study of the subject in our schools 
iM'tran in the fiftli year with the reading of an elementary text- 
book. If anything was attempted in the primary grades by 
anv of tlie teafh<M's in this work, the methods used were as 
often as apt to b(; l)a<l as good, and no well-ordered plan of 
tcacliini!- it pervadiMl the difVei-ent grades. This has all been 
(•hanged, and, wliiU' it is doubtless true tliat room for improve- 
ment still exists, tlnTe is now a detined plan of work in the 
stndy extendintr IVoni the lowest pi-iniary grade through the 
Lrranunar scIkjoIs. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 67 

The experience of the l>e8t teachers has demonstrated that 
e teaching of this subject in the primary grades is best done 
ith oral lessons. The teachers should call to their aid 
Ltural forms and the moulding board, and th(» children learn 
regard the study of geography as a concrete branch of 
lowledge, and not an abstract one. 

The present course has been arranged with the above ideas 

vi(;w, and the text-book study is preceded by a series of well- 
»tined oral lessons. 

Throughout the course, both in tlie study of the subject that 
•ecedes the use of the text-book, and that which follows after 
le text-books are in tlu^ pupils' hands, the work is made as 
>ncr(?te as possible by moulding boards, globes, maps, 
>th with flat and raised surfaces, solar cameras, and the pres- 
ice in the school room of the actual products of tlie various 
)untries; geograplucal readers an<l books of travel are read 
I connection, and refenMice books of various kinds are at tlu^ 
»rvice of tlie jmpils. 

OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY— PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Natural objects : their form, color, nuiterial, use, etc. ; their 
:»lations of place, direction and distance ; tlie use of words to 
idicate place, and those that are uscmI in (h'scription. Coii- 
ersation lessons on topics like the following: (a) Day, 
ight, heat, cold, winds, clouds, rain, snow, etc. ; (b) on ani- 
lals and plants that have their home (1) on land, (2) in the 
rater; plans of the scho(»l room, school grouinis, and outline 
lap of New Bedford drawn by the pupils, studied in relation 
form and special features; simple mrasurements : the 
joints of the compass, also the names of the seasons, with the 
nonths comprised in them, and eeitain natural phenomena 
ncident to each season; observations on the weather, and 
recording the same: evaporation and eondensaticni shown by 
exiKTiment, and application of the same to the* formation of 



68 superintendent's report. 

clouds, rain and snow ; the forms of land and water taujirlit 
from the real earth itself when possible, otherwise from repn- 
sentations by jiictures and moulding board ; the eailh 
studied as a great ball moving in space, lighted by the sun uiul 
surrounded by air, having daily and yearly motions, each of 
which produces its special effect; also its surface as divided into 
zones or belts. Special study is made of local geogi-aphy ; the 
typical forms of land and water; chai'actiiri sties of surfact', 
drainage, soil, and mineral ))roducts ; something of local his- 
tory and the occupations of the people. Both geographical 
and science readers are read in connection to help fix the con- 
ceptions gained by tlie pupils in their oral lessons and to 
develoj) new trains of thought concerning the subjects* taught^ 

THE GRAMMAR COURSE. 

This course V»egins with the fifth year of school life and a 
text-book used. The same un<lerlying principles of instructioi 
aie foUowed, liowever, as in tlie primary grades, and is a con 
tinuation of that course in a bioader form. The following i? 
the course as laid down : 

OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY— GRAMMAR GRADES. 

Fijlh Year. 

1. (a) Review briefly the work of preceding yeai"s. (b) 
Coiitiiicnt of North America. Plan for studv of a continent: 

1. Position. 

2. Shape. 
.*{. Si/0. 

4. Boundaries. 

5. Outline : Seas, i^^ulfs, bavs, etc. ; capes, islands. 

<). Surface : Mountains, valleys, plains, plateaus, deserts, slopes. 

7. Rivers : Source, direction, mouth, uses, for what noted. 

S. Lakes: Fresh or salt, outlet, facts of special interest. 

I). Climate : Zones, len<(th of dav, elevation, slope, winds, currents. 



r ' — 



superintendent's report. 09 

10. Productions: Animals and plants peculiar to continent; animal, 
plant, and mineral productions and exports. 

11. Countries: Capitals, a few leading cities, for what noted, people, 
character, language, religion, history. 

12. Railroads, steamship lines. 

2. Study with reference to position, lioundaries, relief, 
drainage, climate, animal, vegetable and mineral productions, 
the following countries : The Unit<3d States, British America, 
Mexico, Central America, West Indies, South America, (com- 
pare South America with North America). 

3. A few important cities of em^h of these countries 
studied and compared. 

4. Mathematical geograpliy as in the fourth year. 
Iiuiiginary jounieys taken to sucli points as are of special 
interest. Principal water or milroad routes to be followed. 
Sketch maps. Write about subjects and places studied. 
Illustrate with pictures, relief maps, etc. Rtmd geograpliical 
i-eaders and other pertinent books. Text-book for reference 
u.nd reading. 

Sijrth Year, 

1. Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the important Con- 

t inental islands. Study briefly each grand division as a wliole, 

in reference to position, reliefs, drainage, vegetahle, mineral 

a.nd animal productions. A few important countries of each 

^raud division noted, with well-known cities, (if possessing 

any), and such comparisons made with other countries or 

cities as the teacher may find liclpful. (See j)lan for study of 

continent). Imaginary journeys. (See fifth year). 

2. Sketch maps. Write upon sulyects and ])laces studied. 
Ki'ud from suitable books. 

3. Mathematical geogra[»]iy begun. Text-book for refer- 
cucc and study of topics as assigned. 



70 superintendent's report. 

Seventh Year. 

1. The United States as a whole in brief review. It? 
position ; boundaries ; characteristics ; physical features ; con- 
tiguous ocean currents ; the States and Territories coniposiuir 
it, with number of each and names ; tlie cities and other j>latM ^ 
of greatest importance, commercially, historically, et<.'. ; general 
form of government and chief ])ursuits of the people. 

2. Study the States by groups. New England States, wit^^ 
critical study of Massachusetts. Middle Atlantic SUites. T k \^' 
Southern States. The East Central States. The West Cc- \^ 
tral States. The Pacific States and Territories. 

Plan for study of a group : 

(a) The names of States forming group. 

(b) Its general and relative position. 

(c) Its marked physical features. 

(d) Its climate. 

(e) Principal productions and occupations of people; show cause a^^ 
relation. 

(f) A few of its most important cities. The line in which they a^^ 
important and the causes that have contributed to make them important——^ 

(g) Important historical associations, if any. 

3. If time* j)ermit, brief review by topics of Hriti.— — 
America, Mexico, West Indies, and South America. 

4. Matliematical geograpliy continued as reviews. 

5. Sketch maps, and write throughout year upon subject-^ 
studied. Read pertinent reading matter. 

6. Text-book for reference and study. 

Eighth Year, 

1. Europe: Studied as a wliole and by representative sec- 
tions. Topical study us indicated in previous years. 

Europe^ stands in the closest reLation to our own country in. 
many ways, and tlierefore should be studied more closelv than 



superintendent's report. 71 

any other foreign division. Owing to its great importance, 
an<l its historical associations, its arts and its literature, the 
reading in connection with the study of this grand division 
should Im3 broad, and the written work of the pupils in con- 
iioetion with the study should be extensive. 

2. Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Continental islands 
stinli(»cl as broadly as time pennits. 

:^. Mathematical geography continued as reviews. 

4. Sketch maps, read, write. 

'). Text-book for reference and study. 

Ni/fth Year. 
1. Topical reviews once a week on the following subjects: 

1. Mathematical geography. 

2. Physical geography of the earth as a whole and hy continents; 
<^liaracteristic features; incidental features; products as related to physical 
regions ; ocean currents, their uses, etc. 

3. Political and social geography. Great nations of the world, princi- 
pal tomis of government; great industries and their relation to natural 
and other conditions; lines of travel and commerce; the influence of 
nations and their social and religious conditions. 

4. Read and w^rite. 

HISTORY. 

Tlie most eminent teachers of liistory arc agreed as to the 

methods to be pursued in proparinj^ cliildnni for the formal study 

of the subject. The first thing neodt'ul is to quicken tlieir 

imairinations and to store their meniories witli incidents and 

•a.>*sociations. In speaking of the order of lessons Dr. 

iHMstcrweg says : " The first step would ofter tales and legends ; 

^Jk'u tales of adventure, which is the first inti-oduction into 

l»i'a(!tical life and a help in comprehending the most elementary 

civilization, which is not yet included in the rceonls of history, 

^"'1 is nevertheless demanded for tln^ (M)mpr(»hr!ision of his- 



72 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

torical work. The first step is concluded by biographies — 
which pretend t() l)e only biographies — with a certain jioetical 
coloring. They find their elementary limitations and import- 
ance in that they, aside from single features, clearly and 
minutely depict the summit of ideal activity, thereby early 
making the pupil familiar with ancient as well as modern 
heroes, and, at the same time, affording a cursory view into the 
centres of the manifold labor of civilization, public as well as 
private." It does not seem necessary that there should be 
a definite plan or order in the acquisition of these stories, 
great names, and important events, but that the children should 
at an eaily age become accjuainted witli them. 

It is also agreed by these eminent authorities that children 
should )>egin tlie formal study of the siil)ject with the history of 
their own countrv. What the order should be after that is not 
so well agreed upon by them. One prominent professor of 
history in this country says : " When we pass to the next 
stage, and ask what branch of liistory should follow (in 
American schools) tlnit of the United States, the answers 
would be various. Th(^ usual practice is to take up (Tcneral 
liistory at tliis point ; l)ut I think the practice is not a wise 
one." And he goes on to give very cogent reasons to show 
why tlie order is not a good one. 1 am inclined to agree with 
him in this opinion, and as General History follows in the 
High school the study of United States History in the gram- 
mar schools, I biing forward tliis subject for future consideni- 
tion. 

Th<' general plan laid down by Dr. Deisterweg for the study 
of liistorv is I'ol lowed in our elenientarv schools. Much more 
might, and should 1m» dono in the primary and lowest grammar 
^ladcs in tlu' inattei* of story-tolling, legends, tales of adven- 
ture, etc. \^v. i)(Mst(M"W(»g assumes that the formal study 
of history is taken up at the aire of 10 vears, but with us and 
in most American schools this is not done until several vears 
later. 



superintendent's report. 73 

With lis, the first formal recognition of history as a branch 
of study begins in the sixth year of school by reading Edward 
Eggleston's small history of the United States. The work that 
year cun scarcely be considered a formal study of the subject. 
The book is biographical in its composition, and illustrates the 
second stage of historical study. The following, or seventh year, 
Higginson's school history is read. During the next two years 
the study is pursued with a conventional text-book, supple- 
mented by various other histories and books of reference. 
More or less of civics is taught in connection. 

The special method of instruction used in the higher grades 
is that which is known as the topical method. Beginning with 
the early collonization of the country, the whole period of its 
growth to the present time is traced out. Only those dates which 
mark great events are required ; the study of the less important 
occurrences are considered in relation to the greater. The 
pupils are encouraged to seek the causes of events and their 
eflfects, and to clothe their thoughts in their own words ratlier 
than to attempt to memorize the words of tlio author. While 
the words of the book may be the best, and the value of com- 
mitting to memory is not to l)e ignored, the pupil's compre- 
hension of the subject is best revealed when lie recites in his 
own language. That the results obtained in tlie study of his- 
tory are not satisfactory, is generally admitted. What the 
reasons are for this are accounted for in different ways by 
diflFerent authorities. Dr. G. Stanley Ilall, in writing upon the 
subject says, "The high educational value of history is too 
great to be left to teachers who merely hear n^citations, keep- 
ing the finger on the place in the text-book, and only asking 
the questions conveniently printed for them in the margin or 
back of the book, — teachers, too, who know that their present 
method is a good illustration of how history ought not to ])e 
taught, and who would do better if opportunity wn-e offered 
thorn." He recommends special toacheris for largci* towns, 

10 



74 superintendent's report. 

who should go fi'om room to room, or from one school house 
to another, and give instruction in history alone. This is a 
contention for dej)artmental instruction, which I have stated 
before seems to be a point in educational evolution, to which 
we are tending. Anotlier writer, Thos. Wentworth Higginson, 
says, **In truth, the whole situation, in respect to history, is 
described in that well-known conversation between the English 
clergyman and the play-actor. ^Why is it,' asked the clergy- 
man, <that you, who represent what everybody knows to be 
false, obtain more attention than we who deal in the most 
momentous realities !' ^It is,' said the actor, ^because you 
r(»present the trutli so that it seems like fiction, while we depit 
fiction in sucli a manner that it has the effect of truth.' Tli 
moral of it all is, that the fault is not in the chihl, but in u 
who write the books and teach the lessons. If the subjcc 
loses all its charms by our handling, the fault is ours, and m 
sliould not blame the child." 



PENMANSHIP. 

It is a useful accomplislnnent to be a good penman. Wit 
good teaching and persistent rflori on the part of the learner — 
almost any one can become a good penman. The scliools5=' 
should be able at h^ast to make fair penmen of the pupils who^ 
go through its grammar schools. Their handwriting should 
be not only easily legibh*, ])ut it should be neat and have some 
character. Thev should l>e able to write with ease and with 
some rapidity. 

I rcgi'ct that I must acknowledge that this is not accom- 
plished ill our scliools. The teachers labor hard apparently to 
seciiie tlie (lesii"ed results. Ihii too nmch of the penmanship 
is cianiped, irreirnlai', and labored. The best results are 
()l>taine(l in tlie lower primary grades. After that the progress 
is not so good. Those pupils who continue their course 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 75 

through the High school are frequently miserable penmen wlieii 
they graduate. This is not only true of our own schools, but 
of the great majority. Many places employ a special teacher of 
this subject, and better results are thereby obtiiinod. Teachers 
generally attribute the poor results to lack of time and the great 
amount of written work that is now demanded. They claim 
that the minds of the pupils are intent on the subject matter to 
be written, and they therefore grow careless in their penman- 
ship; that the small amount of special instruction that they are 
able to give in penmanship alone does not overcome this. 
There is some justice in these claims, but they are not a sufficient 
excuse. Poor teaching of the subject, the lack of high enough 
ideals, and failure to persistently exact the best work from 
every pupil in every gmde are largely responsil>le for the poor 
results. 

The course: In addition to copying words the pui)ils begin 
in the lowest gi-ade to form the small letters, beginniug with i, u, m, 
and during the first two years they l(?arn to make all the small 
letters and capitals. A tracing book is taken in the third year, 
and writing books are used throughout the remaining primary 
and througli the grammar grades. The writing lessons are 
alternated with the drawing lessons. These are usually 
preceded by movement exercises for the purpose of securing 
freedom of movement. 

Of course the special wTiting lessons rojjresent a very small 
part of the writing done by the pupils. They are constantly 
vrriting, and their penmanship in tiieir written w^ork seldom 
compares favorably with that doiu' in their writing books. 
This should not be so, if the pupils are to acijiiire a good, per- 
manent style. It would be better if writing Ixjoks were 
abolished from the two highest grammar grades, and the time 
now used in writing in them devoted to writing letters, i)nsi- 
nes8 forms, etc., with special reference to j)en!nanshi|). 



76 superintendent's report. 

DRAWING. 

The work in drawing is progressing well. The supervisor, 
with the cordial co-operation of the teachers, is securing good 
results. The report and outline of course of studj which are 
herewith submitted give fully the aim and scope of the work. 



Mr. William E. Hatch, Superintendent of Schooi^: 

Dear Sir, — After a year and a half of service as super- 
visor of form study and drawing, I herewith submit to you ray 
first report. 

To secure a broad and well-balanced training in art educa- 
tion, instruction is given in the three branches into which this 
subject is properly divided : Construction, to gain a knowledge 
of the facts of form ; representation, to acquire the power to see 
and to express the a])pearance of forms as wholes under various 
conditions ; and decoration, which deals with the beauty of 
form and its relation to decorative art. 

In the work of the two lowest grades, the aim is to give the 
child clear and correct ideas of form, as a basis for thought de- 
velopment. His knowledge of the type forms enables him to 
classify common objects around him, and awakens his interest in 
them. His means of expressing ideas of form are language? 
modeling, making. pa|)er folding and cutting, and free-hand 
drawing. In this work we aim not so much at accuracy of 
result, as that it l)e the expression of tlie child's own ideas 
gained l)y his observation. 

In tills first work, it seems more reasonable that picture 
drawing ((hawing the a|)j)earance of the whole form) should 
precede tin' drawing of views, than that views should be taught 
first, thus following in the drawing the same order observed iii 
the study : first, the whole object, then its analysis into parts. 



I 



superintendent's report. 77 

A change to this effect has been made this year, with good 
results. 

Our text-book, " The Use of Models," has been very much 
improved in two new primary manuals, which treat of picture 
drawing and clay modeling in a much more satisfactory 
way, and give interesting and definite help as suggestions in 
nature study. These manuals would greatly assist the primary 
teachers in interpreting the true spirit of form study and its 
relation to other subjects. 

From the third year up to the High school the work is 
carried on by the use of drawing books, with the accompany- 
ing manuals as aids to the teachers. 

I feel very gi-ateful to the Superintendent and Drawing Com- 
mittee for being allowed to introduce these books. The 
results obtained through their use are surely much better edu- 
cationally than could be gained in the public schools by draw- 
ing on paper. The child has a more definite idea of tlie three 
divisions of drawing, and can note his progress, page by page, 
better than he could on loose papers, taken away after each 
lesson. The books also furnisli correct illustrations and good 
examples of historic ornament, suitably arranged for growth in 
the appreciation of beauty. 

To cultivate an appreciation of wliat is good in art, the child 
should have placed before him, to study and to copy, forms 
t)eautiful in outline and proportion, just as one should read 
choice literature and hear good music to increase tlieir taste for 
it, and to gain a higher standard of excellence. 

In the work of the drawing books a decided advance has 
been made this year, as both teachers and j)upils l)etter under- 
stand their use. What is desired is not {)ages finished with 
great accuracy, because of much measuring and testing; but 
the child should be allowed to exercise his judgment as to the 
placing, size and proportion of the drawin*^. In free-hand 
work drawing is not of nmch value which does not train the 
mind, the eye, and the hand at the same time, and teach the 



78 superintendent's report. 

children to draw, independent of mechanical helps. The 
results may be discouraging at first, but better seeing will make 
better drawing. 

Considering the broad scope of this work, the time devoted 
to it, one hour a week, is quite inadequate to gain as satisfac- 
tory results as could be desired. One more half hour s|)ent in 
pencil practice and rapid sketching would eflfect great improve- 
ment. 

For public school work the rule and compass are oP value 
only in the higher grammar grades, where the instrumental 
drawing of views and patterns, or the working of geometric 
problems are required. In all work in construction more time 
is needed for practice in free-hand drawing than for mechanical 
work, to enable the draughtsman to draw quickly and intelli- 
gently the idea in mind before working it out with instrumeuts. 

Pictorial ai't is of special value in education at tlie present 
time, as a means of expressing what the child sees, thinks, and 
learns in every subject, and leads him to closer observation, 
and hence a better understanding of his subject. His work in 
illustration should be in close touch with the regular drawing 
lesson, and should show the result of his training. 

Too much stress cannot be laid upon the aesthetic side of art 
education, which is also a very practical side. If we can lead 
the child to love the beautiful in form and in nature around 
him, we are developing his finer sensibilities and are ennobling 
his whole life. Color is an important factor in aesthetic 
culture, and we could profitably use a supply of materials 
to train this color sense. 

In lookinir over tlu' work throughout the city, I can report 
improvement and |)ro«rress in every school, and I feel that each 
year will find the class entering the High school better 
grounded in this subject. 

In the Iliirh school work, the aim is to build on the founda- 
tion laid in the irraniniar schools, and to carrv the work as far 
as is |)ractical or possible in a very limited time. Here the 



superintendent's report. 79 

true relation of drawing to other subjects should be considered, 
and its value as a quick and accurate means of expression 
recognized. The free-hand sketches of the past year show 
that the pupils have received good and much needed in- 
struction. This will bear fruit not only in drawing as 
Si separate study, but will supplement the work in history, 
science, and language. 

The drawing in the High school has not yet reached its best 
cJevelopment, but every effoii; is being made to bring the work 
into line with the best educational thought on the subject. 

Through this report I wish to express my thanks to the 
t eachers for their hearty co-operation with all my plans, and 
-the earnest spirit in which they have labored to make this study 
t. ell for good in the child's education. 

To the Superintendent and Board of Education I express 
my gratitude for their kindly support, and for the promptness 
and generosity with which they have met every request for 
supplies necessary to carry on this work successfully. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARY W. GILBERT, 

Supervisor of Dravhtg, 



80 



superintendent's report. 



*ld 



COURSE OF STUDY IN DRAWING. 

Form and Drawing. Time, one liour per week. 

FIRST AND SECOND YEARS. 

Teachers* help: "The Use of Models." 

Materials: Tvpe forms and objects based on them; clav; table 
sticks; paper for folding, cutting and pasting; scissors. 

Modes of expression: Language; modeling; folding; cutting »- 
pasting; stick and tablet laying; drawing. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Solids for first half of year: Sphere, cube, and cylinder. 

Solids compared by touch and sight. 

Common objects like them mentioned, and a collection of them maci^ " 

Actions and name of type form in question. 

Modeling of type forms and objects based on them. 

f PI e (Curved. 

Surface: \ i^^^ ' a \ Round. 
1 Curved. 1 „ j- 
'^ ( Roundmg. 

Lessons in location and direction. 

Lessons in building type forms, (work for the imagination.) 

Lessons in seeing type forms and common objects in different positi^^ 

Number. ^^ , 

i oi I Curved. 

,. . . s Plane. ^ , 
Kmd, \ f-^ J, < Round. 

I Curved. J r> j- 

I Rounding ^.j^,^ 

Faces: - Shape -j Square. 

Vertical. ( Oblong. 

Horizontal. 

Opposite. 

Parallel. 

Tablet laving of squares, circles, and oblongs for pleasing arrangcmf 

in a row, round a centre. 

Clay modeling for faces. 

Lessons in location and building of tablets. 

Folding and cutting of squares and oblongs; cutting of circles. 

Number. 



Position, 



Edges 



Kind, 



Po>ition 



( Straight. 
( Curved. 



Vertical. 
Horizontal. 
Opposite. 
I'arallel. 



Stick laying for edges. 

Pencil holiling, and drawing of squares and circles for edges. 

Modeling for edges, either type forms or common objects. 

Outside. ) M-. -r I 'c 

,, ? 1 • J 1 nface or bifacc. 

C orners : \ Inside. j 

Face. 



superintendent's report. 81 

r folding for corners. 

laving and drawing of corners. 

)ns in seeing objects in different pof^itions. 

re drawings^-drawingthe appearance of spherical, cubical, or cvlin- 

ects as wholes in various positions. 

solids for second half of vear: Hemisphere; square prism ; right 

triangular prisms. 

5 compared bv touch and sight. 

ns and name given. 

ction of common objects based on tvpes. 

ling of type forms and objects based on them. 

ce as to kinds. 

re drawing of type forms and objects based on them. 

i studied as to number, kind, shape-, and position ; new shapes, 

•cle and triangle; new position, oblique. 

;t laying for pleasing arrangements; border; rosette. 

s as to number, kind, position; new position, oblique. 

- folding and cutting for faces and edges. 

laying and drawing for faces and edges. 

J } Sharp, 
ers compared : \ ^ * 

' (.Square. 

)ns in location and building of solids. 

C Acute, sharp corner. 
es : -j Right, square corner. 
( Obtuse, blunt corner. 

ing of various shapes for angles. 

r folding for angles. 

modeling of various shapes built up on tablet, for study in shape, 

mgles, etc. 

»ix solids in review, recognizing them first by touch, then by touch 

ht. 

'ling the six type forms and objects based on them. 

;w of faces bv free-hand cuttinj; and bv drauini'. 

s reviewed bv stick laving and cutting. 

re drawing from objects. 

ire drawing from memorx . 

s from memory. 

rrangement of tablets from memory. 

SECOND VEAR. 

solids for first half of year: Eliipsoiii, ovoid, and equilateral tri- 
r prism. 

i*i compared with first six type torni.s and studied accoriliiig to out- 
r previous grade as to surface, faces, edj^es, ami corners. 

♦'hapes : Ellipse, oval, and ecjuilateral triangle. 
*?t la\ing for arrangement of borders and losettes. 
11 



S2 superintendent's report. 

Modeling of type forms and of common objects based on them. 

Paper foldinij of circle, square, and oblong, to teach diameter a**^ 
diagonal. 

Practice in drawing new shapes, and in correct holding and position ^^ 
the pencil. 

Study of leaves based on the ellipse and on the oval. 

Drawing of leaves. 

Drawing and modeling of leaf in relief on clay tablet. 

Triangles compared and cut free-hand. 

Modeling raised squares, circles, triangles, etc., on clay tablets. 

Picture drawing of single solids and of groups, as sphere on cube. "^^ '^'^' 
angular prism on square prism, etc. 

Picture drawing of common objects based on types. 

Bisection, trisection^ and quadrisection taught. 

Paper folding and cutting, to illustrate these principles. 

Pleasing figures dictated in drawing to apply the same principles. 

Proportion 1 to 2, 2 to 3, and 3 to 4 taught. 

Paper folding and cutting for proportion. 

Pleasing figures dictated in drawing for proportion. 

Symmetry of figures studied and ** axis of symmetry" taught by fci:^ * ^' 
ing, cutting, and drawing. 

The nine solids reviewed by sight, by free-hand cutting of faces, and • 

modeling;. 

Seeing lessons and picture drawings of common objects based on tj^' *' 
forms, singly and in groups. 

A mental image of the nine solids described, and stories told of cornn'^ ^^^ 
objects based on them. 

Picture drawings from memory. 

New solids for second half of the year: Cone, pyramid, and vase for""^^ 

New tablet, isosceles triangle. 

Solids compared and studied in tlie usual way. 

Modeling and picture drawinijs of these solids. 

Faces cut fi-ee-hand. 

Free-hand cutting and drawing of vase shape for reversed cur\e. 

Building new solids for work in imagination and language. 

'I'ablet laying for arrangement. 

Modeling and drawing of common objects based on type forms. 

Drawini^, cutting, and pasting of pleasing figures, such as cross, sta'^* 
tiuatrefoil, and rosette, on background ot colored paper. 

Borders cut and pasted ot pleasing units. 

Modification of simple units by drawing. 

ModelinLT the same in raised fiijure on dav tablet. 

Study ot leaves, and modeling in relief. 

Flowers drawn and applied to borders and rosettes. 

.\ gei\erai review ot the two years' work. 



superintendbnt's report. 83 

Beginning with the third year, and extending through the 
ainth year, the course of study is "Prang's Complete Course 
n Form Study and Drawing," and is found in the drawing 
^ooks, accompanied by manuals for the teacliers' use. 

The work is given under three heads : Construction, Reprc- 
^t^iitation, Decoration. The drawing books used are as 
ollows: 

Third Year — Drawing books 1 and 2. 
Fourth Year — Drawing books 2 and 3. 
Fifth Year — Drawing books 3 and 4. 
Sixth Year — Drawing books 4 and 5. 
Seventh Year — Drawing books 5 and 6. 
Eighth Year — Drawing book 7. 
Ninth Year — Drawing book 8. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Time, three-quarters of an hour per week. Course, expeii- 

First Yeftr, 

^lodel drawing: singly and in groups, in planes of light and shade. 

Simple still life groups in planes of light and shade. 

Construction : working drawings. 

Cj>eometric probieras. 

I^Iistoric ornament. 

F*erspective problems, (free-hand.) 

^^ketching of natural forms and conventionalization for design. 

Sketches once in two weeks. 

Scroti fl Ir///\ 

CTontinuation of design from natural forms. 

Cast drawing in outline and in planes of light and shade. (Mediums, 
^oft black and sepia pencils.) 
Talks on historic ornament. 

Hrawings of historic ornament. (Sepia and black pencils.) 
Review of the leading features of first vear's work. 
Sketches once in two weeks. 



84 superintendent's report. 

Thirtl Year, ( OptimaL) 

Free-hand perspective problems. 

Cast drawing in planes of light and shade, and in values. (Charcoal.) 

Lectures and notes on historic ornament. 

Historic ornament from cast. 

Construction. 

Design from historic ornament and from nature. 

Sketches once in two weeks. 

Fourth Yatr. ( OptiniiaL) 

ClajJS to be divided as to whether they wish frce-harnl or 
luechauical drawiii*r. 

Work in still life in charcoal. 

Work from casts in charcoal. 

Design — Design for wall papers, ceilings, hook covers and useful 
objects in pencil and color. 

Historic ornament. 

Lectures on historic slvles, their time and origin. Draw ing from cast> 
for styles of ornament. 

MANUAL TRAINING. 

I tdassify under tliis heading the stowing, cooking and wood- 
working. I have given so much space in jirevious reports to 
urging the extension of this line of work in our schools^ and to 
showing its educational value, that little need be said here 
in regard fo it. I am glad to be able to report that my views 
have met with the indorsemcMit of the Board; that to the sew- 
ing, which has been in the schools for years, has been added a 
cooking school; also that a wood-working school, or manual 
training school proper, has been equipped, and. when the City 
Council gives the necessary money to employ a compctcmt 
iiistnictoi*. will l)e put into operation. I will treat of the work 
of each of these dcjKutments scjuirately and briefly. 

SEWING. 

This branch of manual training has been a part of the 
scliool cinricnhnn (or vears. The girls onlv take it. The 
coiirsr was lornicrly continuous' lor si.v years, beginning with 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 85 

the third year of school life. With the opening of the cooking 
school the course in sewing was shortened one year. It now 
ends with the seventh year of school. 

Course : 

Third and Fourth Grades — Folding papers in different width hems; 
?^ainples on canvas with worsteds of all the stitches; squares of cloth with 
the different stitches in colored thread ; making sewing aprons and small 
V)ags for holding sewing materials. 

Fifth and Sixth Grades — Different stitches in sewing and hasting, except 
tjutton-holes ; darning and glove mending. 

Seventh Grade — Garments of all kinds; darning hutton-holes; glove 
"lending; feather stitching and hemstitching. 

THE COOKING SCHOOL. 

This school went into operation in October, 1893. The de- 
'ay in completing the building prevented the opening of the 
scliDol in September as was intended. Tlie teacher is a 
J?i"uiluate of the Boston Normal Cooking school. 

The attendance is compulsory upon the girls of the eighth 

aucl ninth grades granmiar and those of the mill schools, and 

optional to those of the High school. The girls of the higher 

jrra.des in the country schools are permitted to attend also, if 

tliey desire. There are twenty classes ; a half day once in two 

^'eeks being given to each class. On the day that a class is to 

take it^ cooking lesson it reports din^ctly to the teacher of the 

cooking school. 

The school has been popular from the start. All those in 
the High school who desired to attend the school could not be 
iu^eoraraodated. Each two weeks about 350 girls receive 
a lesson in cooking. I consider the opening of this school 
iiii event of mark in the historv of our schools. The i^ood 
effect of the teaching given there will be felt in many homes, 
and its beneficial influence will be wide-spread. The pupils who 
have the advantages of its instruction will know better how tn 
iidininister a home. It will be a promoter of health. ha|)piness, 
and good morals. 



86 superintendent's report. 

Some idea of the work done there may be obtained from ll»c 
following brief outline of its course of instruction : 

Course of Stl'dy in the New Bedporu Cookixc; Scho*^^- 

1893 AND 1894. 

FIRST LESSON. 

Preliminaries: Hours, plan of work, work of houNckeepers, unifo«"^^* 
etc. 

Fii'e building : Principles of combustion, laws of heat, etc. 
System of measurements. 

SECOND. 

STARCH AND WATER. 

Water: Temperature of boiling and simmering, effects produced, c*-' 
Starch : Cellular structure of plants ; dietetic value of vegetables ; e 
of heat and moisture on starchy food ; cooking temperature, etc. 

Dishes to illustrate : Potatoes, plain, mashed, riced and lyonnaised « 

THIRD. 

STARCH. 

Starch as a grain and as a powder. 

Dishes to illustrate : Rice, cornstarch, mould and white sauce. 

FOURTH. 

ALBUMINOUS FOODS EGGS. 

Albumen : Properties of, cooking temperature, occurrence, etc. 
Dishes to illustrate : Soft and hard cooked eggs, dropped eggs, and 
vermicelli. 

FIFTH. 

ALBUMINOUS FOODS — MILK AND EGGS. 

Milk : Composition, dietetic value, care of, etc. 

Use of food principles in the body. 

Dishes : Rennet custard, soft custard, and omelette. 

SIXTH. 

ALBUMINOUS FOODS — MEAT. 

Meat: Clas^ification, structure, etc., with lesson on marketing. 
Dishes to illustrate: IJroiled steak and tomato soup, with crisped 
crackers. 



SUPfiRINTEanNBNT'S REPORT. 87 

SEVENTH. 

ALBUMIKOUS FOODS — MEAT. 

I^oafiting and left-overs. 

Oiithes to illustrate: Roaftt beef and cottage pie, with cranberry sauce. 

EIGHTH. 

ALBUMINOUS FOODS — FISH. 

Kish : Structure, care of, use, etc. 

l>ishes to illustrate: Baked fish and fish chowder. 

NINTH. 

ALBUMINOUS FOODS — ALBUMENOIDS AND GELATINOIDS. 

Cielatine : Source, properties, etc. 

l>i.shes to illustrate: Soup stock, with croutons; also drippings. 

TENTH. 

CEREALS AND FLOUR. 

Studv of cereals. 
^:>ludv of wheat. 
I^" »4e of baking powder. 

I>is»hes to illustrate: California breakfast food, with baked apples and 
lit ing powder biscuits. 

ELEVENTH. 

FERMENTATION AND BREAD MAKING. 

iStudv of fermentation. 

Irishes to illustrate: Bread and rolls. 

TWELFTH. 

CAKE MAKING. 

Kinds, uses, objective point in cooking, manipulations, etc. 
l>ishes -. Plain cake and water sponge cake. 

THIRTEENTH. 

PASTRY. 

Materials, utensils, manipulations, baking, etc. 
l)'«hes : Squash and apple pie. 

FOURTEENTH. 

INVALID COOKERY. 

'^J"'>ce8R of digestion and care of the sick, 
'^'les: Beverages and ovester stew. 



88 superintendent's report. 

fifteenth. 

INVALID COOKERY. 

Dishes: Oatmeal gruel, beef tea, Irish itiokk, blanch mange and oranges 
for an invalid. 

SIXTEENTH. 

FROZEN DISHES AND SALADS. 

Principles of latent heat considered. 
Dishes : Sherbet and lobster salad. 

THE MANUAL TRAINIXG SCHOOL. 

The benches and tools have been purcliased for this school, 
which will be located in the Sylvia Ann Howland school 
house in a room built specially for this purpose. The boys 
probably will attend from the higher grammar grades and the 
lower class in the High school. The plan is to have each pupil 
who attends give half a day once in two weeks to this work, 
as the girls do in the cooking school. 

[ ex})ect this school to be as popular with the boys Jis the 
(booking school is witii th(i girls. I have no doubt that m;^ny 
boys who appear dull and take but slight interest in their regidair 
work, will tak(5 this with an interest that will uplift, them in 
everv wav. Nor do I have anv doubt, but the time ffiven bv 
the boys in this school, instead of retarding their advancement 
in their other studies, will prove a positive help in tliat dirci^- 
tion. Tin*, work at first will be confnied to Sloyd ; some wood 
carving and turning may b(» done. But from these I expein to 
see di'veloped a much broaden* scheme of work. I certainly 
hope that the City (iovernment will soon grant the necessary 
aj)propriatioii to put this school into op<n'ation. 

Musir. 

Tln'ir has b(MMi cxoellciit progress during the year. The 
supervisor is thoroiiirldy (•(|ui|)ped for iiis profession, and works 
(liliii'ciitly and with definite plan. At his ui'gent request tiie 
IJojird substituted (hiring the yeai* the Mason system of diarts 



superintendent's report. 89 

and books for the Normal svstem. I think this will aid to 
jrreater eflfoctivoness, if for no other reason, that the supervisor 
is thoroujxhly in sympathy with tlie Mason i»hin. 

The course^ given in the schools has been funiishe<l me by 
the supervisor, and is submitted: 

MUSIC COURSK. 

FIRST (iRADE. 

The pupils of this grade are taught by rote all the songs on the first 17 
pages of the Xcw First Music Reader. Thev are also to be taught bv note 
all the sonijs and exercises on the first 17 charts of the New First Series. 

Other songs and exercises that the Supervisor ot Music mav direct. 

SECOM) (;kai>e. 

Pupils are taught hv rote all the songs from pages li) to 40 inclusive in 
the New First Music Reader. 

Review charts 13, 14, l(i and 17. 

Pupils are taught to sing bv note all the songs and exercises on charts 
18 to 40, inclusive, of the New First Series. 

Other songs and exercises ilxat the Supervisor of Music may direct. 

THIRD (JKADK. 

Pupils are taught to sing hv note through the first 17 charts of the New 
Second Series; also through the first 25 pages of the New Second Music 
Reader. 

Pupils of this grade to learn the places of the letters on the stalf from 
small g to two-lined g. 

Other songs and exercises that the Supervisor of Music may direct. 

FOFHTH GHADK. 

Pupils of this grade finish the New Second Series of Charts: also learn 
the songs and exercises on pages 25 to Hi^, inclusive, of the New Second 
Reader. 

The pupils of this grade are taught to sing by pitch names the following 
scales: C, (i, I), A. F, F, Bb, Kb, and Ab. 

Other songs and exercises that the Supervisor of Music mav direct. 

12 



( ( 



( ( 



ii 



90 superintendent's report. 

fifth grade. 

Pupils sing from the New Second Music Reader. 
Review pages 38 to 47, and learn page 54. 
" '• 58 and 59, and learn page 63. 

(>4and66, " " " 66. 

70 and 71, " '* " 74. 

76 and 77, •• ♦= •' 80. 

82 and 83, - '♦ " 85. 

88 and 89, •' ** " 91. 

94 and 95, - " '« 96. 
Other songs and exercises that the Supervisor of Music may direct. 

SIXTH (JRADE. 

The New Third Music Reader, pages 1 to 34, receive careful st«-*^^' 
Beginning with page 35, the harmonies and one song in each of the nrB-^^--^ 
and minor keys to be studied. Following this any of the songs on the ^^ 
130 pages of the book. 

Other songs and exercises that the Supervisor of Music may direct. 

SEVENTH (;ilADE. 

The New 'J'hird Music Reader. Review to bottom of 17th page. ^'^'^^ 
11. Three part singing, pages 9 to <>3, inclusive. 
Other songs and exercises that the Supervisor of Music may direct. 

EKJHTIi (JHADE. 

The New Fourth Music Reader. All the songs and exercises of the t^ ^^ 
98 pages. 

Other songs and exercises that the Supervisor of Music may direct. 

NINTH <;UAI)K. 

Review the "Harmonies" of the major and minor keys, and sing f^' 
>()ltci;gios and songs from 99th page on through the book. 

()tinM- songs and exercises tliat the Supervisor of Music may direct. 

ill(;il SCHOOL. 
Part s()n<4s ai\(l (•lu)ruses suitable for lliijh schools. 

KLKMKXTARY SCIKNCE. 

ruder this heading: mny he elass(?d the work ilone in 
physiohnry and li\Lri<'ne — studies i'e(iuire<l hy statute to 1m^ 
tauLilit in the sch<M)l.s — an<l •' Xatiin^ Work," .so called, h(»in'' 



superintendent's report. 91 

work in uatural history, physics, and chemistry. The method 
of teaching these subjects is tlie laboratory method. By 
nieans of the objects themselves and by simple illustrative 
experiments in their presence the pupils are h»d to observe, and 
investigate for themselves, and to record the results of their 
observations by drawings and in writing. In this way not 
only their thinking powers are stinmlated and trained, and 
their reasoning faculties developed, but the. teaching in these 
i*tudies is made to supplement and strengthen that in other 
branches. Thus the correllation of these studies is eftected : 
this is of great importance in these days of sliortened school 
hours and multiplicity of subjects. 

I regard the introduction of this line of work into our 

i^cliools one of the most import^mt movements toward progress 

that has been made for yeai\s. It is lefreshing to enter 

'^ j^ehool room and find the pupils with flowers or minerals 

^^ their hands which they have gathered out of school ; to wit- 

^^ss the experiments illustrating the workings of nature's laws ; 

^o see the interest of tlie children in the work as contrasted 

^'ith the apathy too often manifested by them in othei- studies. 

The tesichers generally endorse the movement most heartily. 

They of course feel their limitations in presenting these sub- 

J^ets, much more probably than in other studies, because few 

nave had special training for the woik. They are, howevei*, 

doing all in their power to get an intelligent conception of the 

^hject of the work, and to ac(|uirc the l)est 'methods of 

presenting it. It is better that a beginning ])e made if the re- 

8ult8 at first are far from satisfactory ; for experience will soon 

^^velop confidence and bettei- methods of picscntation ; with 

"^^i^e m\l come success. 

That the teachers may be guided and assisted in this woik. 
tlie Services of Mr. A. C. Bov(K;n, professcn* of natural historv 
^^ the Bridgewater Nonnal school, have l)ecn secured to 
instruct them. He meets them the last Saturdav forenoon of 
each month, outlines the work and suggests methods. His 



02 superlvtexdent's repout. 

lessons have been most successful, and it would be of grc^it 
advantajre to the schools if lie could be secured to do more in 
this wav. It has occurred to me that an assistant mijrlit l>c 
provided for the teacher of science in the Hijrh school, who 
fouhl also assist in other lines of work there, and part of Mr. 
Allen's time devoted to directing this work in the lower 
schools. 

The Course of Sliiihj for VJcmcnIanj Schools llaommeiuhd ''S 
the (^Niferf'/Kc ^lj)jtoi fifed by the '* Ctfinmltfee of Ten,' 

The National Educational Association, at its meeting ^^ 
IH92, appoint(*d a committee of ten persons, with Presifl*^*^ 
Eliot as rhaiiinan. who should select members of confereii^*^' 
to be or<ranize«l to considei* pro*rrammes of secondary sch<->*^' 
in the United States and the requirements for admisr^*^^ 
to college, each conference to consider the proper limits of ^ 
sul)j<'ct, the b(jst methods of instruction, the most desira-^^ 
allotment of time for the subji^ct, and the best meth*^* 
of testin^r the pupils' attainments therein. 

Ten conferences were ap|)ointed of leading school if** 
throughout the country on the leading subjects taught in '^ ^ 
schools. In addition to their leconnnendations for seconds* 
schools, they reconnn(?nd a course of study for primary m^ ^ 
yfrannnar schools, which 1 give l)elow, in contrast to the cou:^ ^ 
pursued in our schools. Of the J)() members of the conference 
47 were in the service of colleges or universities, 42 in t^ * 
seivice of schools — chiefly academies and high Schools — ii'^ 
owv. was a government ollicial. In presenting the course t ^ 
coniniittee say that it does not yield without moditieati^ 
a practical programme, but furnishes the nmterials from wlii ^ 
serviceable progranunes may be made. 



SUPERINTESDEXT 8 REPORT. 



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94 superintendent's report. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

It is not iinrcasoiial)lo to exyioct to find in the High schoC 
of a city teachin<r superior to that of any other of its schools 
The hi<]:hest sahiries paid anv of the teachers in the citv ar* 
paid therC; and shouhl command teachers possessing not onh 
breadth of education, but skill in the art of teaching itself 
None should be considered elligiblc for appointment to teacl 
in it wIhV do not possess a colIeg(* education or its equivalent; 
and cities like ours that pay fail* salaries, at least, can command 
in addition successful experience. It is not true, however, thai 
the best (juality of teaching is always found in High schools 
Nor has there been a sufficiently high standard maintained h 
many places in tlu^ selection of t<*achers for the positions. 

Wiiile I do not wish to cast any reflection upon tht» teaching 
corps of our High school, it is a fact that not a lady teacher ii 
it is a college graduate. The assignment of studies, an< 
there foi'e the working of the school, has been aflected by thi 
condition. It gives me pleasure to be able to state that thi 
]^)ard has n^cently adopted a regulation by which hercafte 
applicants for positions in the High school must be colleg* 
graduat(»s or shall have had an equivalent preparation. 

Some of the teaching in the school is too exacting aiw 
beyond the capabilities of the average pupils in the elas;j 
Such teaching obscures rather than enlightens the subject 
treated, and is very discouraging to the learners. Thee 
again, the lec^ture method of teaching is indulged in to adegre« 
that cannot lie approved. I have called attention to tlii 
before. The children an^ told so much that the facts o 
knowledge even ]>cc(uue confused in their minds. This inetho* 
of t(?aching should only be used as an occasional form, not a 
a regular one, Avith pupils of the schools. It is adapter 
to universitv instruction, and has its limitations even there. A 
opposed to these forms of teaching, which are apt to be peitulia 
to those teachers who are thoroughly versed in their subject 



superintendent's report. 95 

'^re tlios^e tljat fail from laxity in preparation, or in conducting 
^ht- recitations. But the school shouhl not ho (»riticised as a 
^'holft because these faults exist in individual t(»aching. All 
'^^■hools have their weak sj^ots, and to these should tlic remedies 
^^ applied when they are known. 

There is a criticism made frequehtly against teachei-s, from 

^'uch some in this school are not exempt, that they use the 

^^*apou of saivasm upon the pupils eitlier as a punisiunent for 

JnLslxjhavior or for failure in lessons. No teacher can indulge 

in isarcasm and not lose the res[>ect and good-will of those at 

least a<rainst whom it is employed, and it stirs the wrong 

c^iotions hi all hearers. I doiiht the usefulness of anv teaelun' 

^^ho jjs prone to saix*asm, what(»ver his or her other good ([uali- 

^'**f^ ; no irood comes from its use, and it is productive jdways 

<>^ evil. 

I agi-ee with the principal, whose report follows, that the 
eflR-oieucy of the school would he increased by some moditica- 
^•^>ii of the course of study; the course in English n^'ods 
paring; the college course shouhl ))e readjusted; the nn'litary 
^^partment should be established on aditterent ))asis, and other 
inirior changes should be made. 1 agree most heartily with 
whut he has to say in regard to the attendance, lir might 
h«xvc gone further and spoken of other harmful infhu'nces. 
There is always a small contingent of |)upils in every Uiirh 
i^chool who are very derelict in their duty. 

At present in the school there ai-(i c<^rtain pupils, chiefly boys, 

who are getting but little out of the scliool, and ar(^ a positive 

mjurj to its best interests. Parents must not e\|M»et the 

school to do the best by their children unless they themselves 

i*^ their duty also; the school has all it can do in its own 

l<^ixitimate sphere, and cannot be exp(M*te(l to assmne all the 

»*^'*ponsibilities of the home in addition to its own. 

Mr. Ray Greene Huling, who had serviid as j)rineipal of tiiii 
•'^'liool for seven years, accepted a call to ('aniiM'idL^<' in June to 
^^ charge of its English IJigh school. L'ndei- Mi*. lluliiiL^ 



06 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

the school had increased in numl)ers, and during his ser\'ice 
several improveinonts in the course of study and in the gcnoral 
work of the school were made. 

The new principal, Mr. Charhjs Sturtevant ilooro. took 
cliarge of tlie school at the beginning of the fall term. He 
has labored assiduously since that time to inform himself of the 
condition of the school and its needs. He brings to the posi- 
tion the ripe experience of 20 years of service in both public 
and private schools, and being a stranger to both the school 
and teachers, has no cause for ]>rcjudice in respect to any one 
or the previous administration of the school. I have, for these 
reasons, asked him to embody his views on the school in a n*- 
port. He lias done so, and it is herewith submitted. 

While refraining from any atttMupt to tu'count for the wcalv- 
n esses which he points out, he proceeds to show that thoy 
exist, and suggests some remedies. I can endorse his recoiB- 
mendations in general, for they are in line with my ovm views 
and previous suggestions, and 1 hope they will receive the early 
attention of the School Hoard. 



The Hkjh j^ciiool. New Bedford, Mass. 

Mr, WdUam K. Hafch. Siipvr'ivteyidciit of Schools: 

Dear Sir, — In iu*cordance with your recjuest, I respectf^* 
submit the following Report on the High school. 

Tli<3 registration from September 5, 1893, to January 
l^<94, has been as follows: Boys, 175; girls, 232; XjO^^ 
407; the average number belonging, 395 ; the average \\i^^ 
attendance. 374. 

Th(» following statisti(*s may also be of interest and val** 
The onterinjir class numbered 139, of whom 56 took IauX^ 
The wlioh* nnmljcr of pupils taking Latin is 108 — boys ^ 
girls 72; the whole numl)er of pupils taking (ireck is IS 
boys (>. girls 10; the Avhole number of pupils preparing 



m 

superintendent's report. 97 

lege or scientific school is C^i} — boys 46, girls 20; post- 
duates, boys 2, girls 0. 

••^ollowing the wishes of the High Si!hool Committee, I have 
en but half of my time to instruction, reserving half for 
ervision of the work done in the various rooms. It was mv 
h to take the largest section of the entciring class, that 
ji|j^ht, at the beginning of their course, set for them the 
[idard which they were to maintain throughout the four 
.rs, and also that I might become acquainted with the outfit 
I mental condition of those whom the High school under- 
es to train. In this wav I could estimat(* more accuratelv 
possibilities of the school so far as the material with 
ich it has to do is concerned. I was unable to do this, 

there was no teacher, outside of the teachers of special 
3artnients, qualified to make the nec^essary int(»rchange of 
rk. 

The half of my time set aside for su[)ervision has been 
luced to about one-third by necessary attention to routine 
,tters, to discipline, (general and individual,) and to calls 
►ni parents. It has not been (»asy, therefore, to acciuaint myself 
iniately with the work of all the classes, of which there have 
en about two hundred and fifty per week, while I have had 
t fifteen periods per week free for such work. 
I have succeeded, however, in getting a fair comi)rehension 

the spirit and methods of each teacher, of the ciuality of the 
>rk of the pupils as a whole, and also in many individual 

During the second half year the necessity of taking an 
Iditional class will further reduce the time available for super- 
sion, much to my regret. 

About one-tenth of my free time has been ^iven to individual 
iipils who seemed to need advice, encourairement, or stimulus 
> aid them in critical ]>eriods of their school life. The 
i^ponsibility placed upon the ]>rincipal, of knowintr what is 
eing done throughout the school and of <letermining from 
13 



98 superintendext's report. 

personal knowletlgc, largely, fitness for promotion, carries with 
it the necessity of having ample opportunity for personal 
ficquaintance with the work of all the classes. The j)lan is an 
excellent one, and cannot fail to be jjroductive of good for both 
teachers and faipils. 

Some defect^s in the* course of study are noticeable, and 
I have, conscMpiently, asketl the Committee to consider the 
advisability of revising it. 1 will mention here one or two of 
these defects. 

There are two classes for beginners in Latin, one in the 
fourth class and one in the third class. This makes necessarv 
two grades of Latin work throughout the course, and is neither 
useful nor o(!onomical. To quote from an important educa- 
tional report recently pul>lished, "Every subject which is taught 
at all should be taught in the same way and to the same extent 
to (nery pupil as long as he pursues it, no matter what the 
probable destination of the ])U])il may be or at what point his 
education is to c(^ase." 

Four veins are ample, with the average jmpil, for a thorough 
prej>aration for (*olleg<\, prodded the studies are arranged trith n 
nmstnnt rcirard to thr. end in rietr. A numl>er of the pupils 
now in th(» High s<;ho<)l will be coinpelletl to take five years, 
und some six y(»nrs, to pn^pare for college. While in a few 
cases this is due to a late decision in favor of college prepara- 
tion, in the others it is the result of a faulty arrangement of 
the coMi'se of study. Whatev(T the cause, the rejuitation of 
the scliool Slitters, as the impression will be given that pupils 
caiiiiot tit lor (oneire in four y(»ars at the High school. 

S(nn(? steps have ah'cady been taken to relieve individual 
eases, but for ])erinaiieiit iM^lief a '^college prei)aratory course" 
should l)e earefullv anaiijred and efficientlv maintained. I 
will not now eiilai*ge upon other defects, tinisting that the 
whole subject will \h\ acted iij)on by the Committee. 

A til in believer in the value, physically, mentally and morally, 
of niilitaiy drill properly conducted, I trust that the Committee 



^.T 



superintendent's report. 99 

\%'ill soon re-establish it with more in the way of equipment and 
variety of work than before, to stimulate ambition, pride and 
interest, that there may be a strong and wholesome es2)rit du 

The relations of the High School Corps of Cadets to the 
school authorities need to be set forth clearly, and then strictly 
maintained. 

A well considered course of [)hysical exercises under a 
competent instructor should, in my judgment, be provided for 
the girls, as is done in many of the Ijcst schools elsewhere. 

A strikingly large number of tardinesses, absences antl dis- 
missals before the close of the session, far in excess of what 
?^eenis necessary, and yet receiving tlu* parents' sanction, 
^Appears to [)oint to a failure on the parents' j>art to realize the 
iictual loss and injury accruing to tlu* children from such 
i ri-egularity. Parents cannot rightly expect the best results 
for their child from the school life and influence wlicn they 
IVequently abridge the school hours, and thus practically teacli 
the child that the time spent in school is of comparatively 
little value. Furthermore, irregularity on the })art of some 
tends to produce irregularity on the part of others, and there 
eertainly rests upon each parent tlie oldigation to co-operate 
vith the Committee (who have arranged the hours in the best 
interests of all concerned) in making the school as efficient as 
possible, not only in the line of instruction, but also in its 
efforts (in accordance with the ^^tatutes) to develop nioial 
< qualities, such as punctuality and fidelity to duty. 

Before closing 1 would say that the sfurit of the ])upils as a 
whole is good. There is no lack of natui-al ability or ol' 
willingness to undeilake assigned work. Tht' ]Kif)ils' sclf- 
leiianee, however, needs to be cultivated. Thev nnist Ix' 
fi'uined to have their knowledge more available and consciously 
^0 connect it more practically with life and its demands. 
Respectfully yours, 

CHARLES STURTKVAX'r MOOKK. 

I^rnuqnil. 



»_Vb. 


ToUl. 


3 


3 


2 


2 




7 


4 


4 


5 


9 



KM) superintendent's rei*okt. 

STATISTICS OF INTEREST. 

Graduates of 18U3 pursuing advanced courses : 

GirU. 
College, 
Medical, 
Swain school, 

Harrington Training school, 7 

Institute of Technology, 
Post-graduate in High school, 4 

11 14 25 

Post-graduates in the High school during 185)3, now pursuing advanced 
courses : 

Girls. Boys. Total. 

College, 
Medical school, 

Harrington school, 4 4 

Technology, 1 1 

4 1 5 

ENTERING PUPILS. 

Pupils entering High >chool, SeptemlKfr, 1893: 

From New Bedford puhlic schools, 
From other schools, 

72 67 13t» 

Post-graduates in the High school, \H\)2: 

Girls. 

January to June, 7 

September to December, 7 

14 8 22 

INIKNIHiNS «.(»MKKMN«f \I)VANCED COlRSES. 

Cla>>i».al toursc (to enter college with Cireek) : 

Girls. Boys. Total. 

Senior cla», 13 4 

Sub-senior cla>s, 2 3 5 

Junior clas>, 1 1 

Sub-junior cla>s, 2 7 9 



Girls. 


Boys. 


Total 


«7 


61 


1*28 


;> 


6 


11 



Bovs. 


Total. 


4 


11 


4 


11 



superintendent's uepout. 101 

To enter college without Greek : 

Girls. Boya. Total. 

Senior class, H 5.11 

Sub-senior class, 

Junior class, 17 8 

Sub-junior class, 1 i' 10 

To enter scientific or medical schools : 

GirU. Bovs. Total. 

to 

Post-graduate, 2 2 

Senior class, H H 

Sub-senior class, 2 2 

Junior class, 4 4 
Sub-junior class. 

PEDAGO(;iCAL LIBRARY. 

Books added during the year are as follows : 

No. 208. Children's Rights Kate Douglas Wiggin. 

209. Theory of Educational Slovd Salomon. 

210. Kindergarten Stories and Morning 

Talks Wiltse. 

211. Entomology for Beginners Packard. 

212. Nature Study Jackman. 

213. I low to Know the Wild Flowers .... Dana. 

214. Flowers and Their Pedigrees ; Grant Allen. 

21o. Native Trees L.W.Russell. 

216. A Year Among the Trees Wilson Flagg. 

217. Trees of the Northern U. S ^^pgar. 

218. From Seed to Leaf Newell. 

219. Working Drawings in Sloyd Gustaf Larsson. 

220. Report of the Commission on Manual 

Training and Industrial Education. 

221. Lange's Apperception DeGarmo. 

222. Inventional Geometry Wm. George Spencer. 

22i^. Inventional Geometry Wm. Cieorge Spencer. 

CONCLUSION. 

It is 110 easy task to prepare a report each year for our citi- 
zens which will ;?ive them the iritbrniatiori ihev inav desire 
about their school system and its operation, and set forth the 
proper suggestions for its improvement. And, alter all, it 
is also doul>tful whether verv many of those who should be 



102 superintendent's report. 

most interested in the schools, those whose children attend 
them, t4ike even the pains to glance at its pages after it is pre- 
pared, r often wonder that so many parents are willin«: 
to remain in almost complete ignorance of the schools to which 
year in and year out tlicy entrust the physical, mental and 
moral well-being of tlicir children. I for one wish that moi-e 
of tliem would take an active interest in everything that con- 
cerns the schools. If they did teachers and pupils would be 
stinmlated and encouraged in their efforts, and the acts of the 
school authorities being better understood, would receive 
heartier endorsement, or at least more intelligent criticism. 

It appears to me, in dealing with the many cases of dis- 
cipline, truancy, and neglect of work that arise each year that 
many parents are inclined to throw too nmch responsibility 
upon the schools. The teachers strive hard to inculcate habits 
of oi'der, neatness, politeness, iHjgularity, and diligence in p(*r- 
fonnance of duty, and morality, but their efforts must be 
supplemented ])y the proper direction of the children outside 
the school if the teaching is to have its proper effect in school. 
Moral lessons in the schools cannot counteract the pernicious in- 
fluences of the street and the cheap variety show ; and parents 
who ])ermit their chiklren to drift, about the city day and even- 
ing, or attend entertainments which are debasing, must not be 
surprised if their children are not what they should be. Again, 
it is difficult for the schools to enforce upon the jiupils habits 
of obedience to law, and diligence in the performance of duty, 
if at home there is no government, and the whims of the chil- 
dren are catered to there. Children should be sent to school 
icgularly and promptly; their pastimes out of school should 
have the i)arents' thought and direction ; their complaints of 
injustice done them in school should receive consideration: but 
only after careful investigation of the facts shoidd judgment be 
j)asse(l. If these things were done, there would be less friction 
between jMipils and teachers ; the children would learn to ex]K»ct 
justi(!e. not approval, at home, whether right or wrong; and 



superintendent's report. 103 

thev would grow up with better dispositions, and trained to a 
fuller sense of justice and duty. 

In closing, I wish to express to the teachers my appreciation 
of their work, their ready response to suggestion, and their (ro- 
operation in carrying forward new lines of work. 

To the S<jhool Committee, much credit is due for their un- 
selfish labor in the interests of the schools, and I wish to 
express here my thanks for their support and their forbearance. 
Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HATCH, 

Superintendent of Schools, 



LIST OF TEACHERS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Summer street, between Mill and North streets. 



Grade. 



Charles S. Moore, principal, 
Charles T. Bonney, Jr., sub-master, 
Charles R. Allen, science teacher. 

1 Sarah D. Ottiwell, assistant, 

2 Lydia J. Cranston, 

2 Elizabeth P. Briggs, 

3 Lucretia N. Smith, 

3 Mabel W. Cleveland. 

4 Mary K. Austin, 
4 Emma K. Shaw, 
4 Helen L. Hadlev 

Katharine M. Crabtree, drawing, 



it 



( ( 



t i 



i i 



< ( 



25 Seventh street, $2,750 
121 Washington street, 1,600 

County street, 1,(500 

184 Kempton street, IKM) 

1-29 Elm street, JKM) 

366 Union street, 900 

72 Foster street, J>00 

81 North street, 800 

512 Kempton street, iKM) 

72 High street, JHIO 

196 Grinnell street, 800 

256 Union street, 700 



Fifth Strekt 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Fifth street, corner of Russell street. 

Ill Acushnet avenue, $1,900 

17 Bonney street, 600 

238 Acushnet avenue, (iOO 

25 Madison street, 000 

352 County street, 600 

68 Fifth street, 600 

55 North Sixth street, 600 

28 Fifth street, 000 

127 Grinnell street, 600 

147 Acushnet avenue, 550 

185 Fourth street, 600 





Allen F. Wood, principal, 


.5 


Lydia J. Macreading, 


assistant. 


5 


Harriet F. Hart, 


« » 


(; 


Mary E. Allen, 


i i 


6 


Sarah E. Stoddard, 


<k 


7 


Emma A. McAfee. 


• i 


i 


Janet Hunter. 


» k 


H 


Blanche W. Sheldon, 


• « 


S 


Marv A. Kane, 


• • 


9 


Grace L. Carver. 


; ( 


9 


Nancv 1 1. Brocks. 


«i 



superintendent's report. 



lOf) 



Middle Street 



Summer street, between Elm and Middle streets. 



i 

7 
H 
8 

9 



George H. Tripp, principal, 

Flelen Ring, assistant, 

Katharine Commerford, " 

Etta M. Abbott, 

Lucy B. Fish, 

Julia C. Gifford, 

Clara B. Watson, 

Helen McCoy, *• 

Clara S. Vincent, 

Agnes J. Dunlap, •' 



Fairhaven, 
•J71 Union street. 
Ashland street, 
283 Middle street, 
115 Maxfield street, 
9 Arch street, 
H7 Fifth street, 
68 Walden street, 
283 Middle street, 
117 Hillman street, 



F*ARKER Street : 



Parker street, near County street. 



Francis J. Heavens, principal, 

T) Anna L. Jennings, assistant, 

5 Agnes W. Lindsey, '• 

6 Susan H. Lane, 

6 Emma D. Larrabee, 

7 Regina M. Paul, 

7 Martha A. Hemenway, 

i*> Elizabeth B. Brightman, " 

8 May L. Pettey, 

8 Mariana N. Richmond, 

9 Mary E. Sturtevant, 
9 Emllv A. Delano, 



f)4 Willis street, 
115 Maxfield street, 
105 Kim street, 
2()4 Pleasant street, 
14 Parker street, 
29 Parker street, 
5 Lincoln street, 
14 Parker street, 
22 Pope street, 
34 High street, 
220 Summer street. 
Kast Freetown, 



Thompson Street : 

Thompson street, corner Crapo street. 



7 Katharine N. Lapham, principal. 
8, 9 Lizzie M. Briggs, assistant, 

8 Cora B. Cleveland, 

9 Mary A. Macy, 
9 Daisy M. Butts, 

13 Leonora B. Hamblin, 

13 Annie L. Brownell, 



$1,900 
GOO 
000 
600 
600 
475 
«00 
450 
(MN) 

♦;oo 



$1,900 
600 
600 
600 
600 
500 
6(H) 
6<K) 
6(N) 
(KM) 
600 
600 



Union street, 

351 County street, 

SI North street, 

72 Bedford street. 

116 Willis street, 

South Orchard street, 

15 .Sherman street, 



$1200 
450 
5(M) 
(MX) 
500 
550 
5(K) 



Harrington Training School: 

Court street, corner of Treinont street. 



Josephine B. Stuart, principal, 
Anna W. Braley, assistant. 
Belle Almy, 
Fannie M. Spooner, 

14 



464 Countv street. 
<ili) County street. 
201 Coltaj,'!.' >trect, 
70 Morgan street, 



$1,5(M» 

1 AMH) 

i:>(> 

425 



106 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



Julia W. Corish, 
Grace W. RusKell, 
Kate Moore, 
Florence A. Poole, 



86 Mill street, $425 

152 Purchase street. 40(> 

105 Park street, 425 

168 Mill street, 40(> 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



AcusHNKT Avknue: 



10 
10 

11 
11 

12 
12 
13 
13 
13 



.\cushnet avenue, near Grinnell street. 



Jane C. Thompson, principal, 
Caroline S. Silva, assistant, 
Hattie L. Finlan, 
Elizabeth Bennett, 
Margaret H. Holmes. 
Annie M. King, 
Harriet N. Hyatt, 
Julia M. Pilling, 
Harriet L. Cornell, 



100 Washington street, $7(X) 

81 Washington street, .550 

186 County street, .'>50 

46 State street, 500 

(mi County street, 450 
1074 South Water street, 425 

Acushnet, 425 

24 Seventh street, 425 

151 Middle street, 425 



I. W. Bexjamix : 

Division street, between Acushnet avenue and Second street. 



Jane K. Gihnore, principal, 

10 Susan M. Tompkins, assistant. 

10 Nellie W. Davis, 

11 Dora A. DeWolf, 

11 Sarah K. Kirwin, 
11, 12 Charlotte M. Allen, 

12 Sarah A. Winslow. 
12 Alice A. Taylor, 

12 Eleanor V. Tripp, 

13 Annie C O'Connor. 
13 Mabel Bennett, 

13 Julia A. Hunt, 

13 Kmma L. Ciartland, 



245 Acushnet avenue, 
2 Court street, 
49 Bedford street, 
169 Middle street, 
101 South Sixth street, 
118 Fifth street, 
315 Countv street, 
299 Countv street, 

m 

12 Sherman street. 

299 Countv street, 

114 High street, 

20 Court street, 

51 Washington street. 



Cfdak Strkkt 



Cedar street, corner of Maxfield street. 



10 Annie S. Homer, principal. 

11 I^ossie P. Pierce. a>i*iistant, 

12 Ahhy D. Wliiincy, 

12 Annie L. Edwards, 

13 Willetta IJ. Nickerson. •• 
13 Mabel L. Hathawav, 



117 Hillman street, 
124 Hillman street, 
59 Hill street, 
62 North street, 
85 Morgan street, 
74C} County street, 



$800 
550 
.55<l 
4-25 
550 
4*25 
.550 
500 
450 
.550 
450 
400 
425 



$650 
550 
.V)0 
550 
5.50 
450 



SUPERINTENDENT 8 REPORT. 



107 



Cedar Grove Street : 



Cedar Grove street, near Acushnet avenue. 



Maria B. Clark, principal, 

10 Flora £. Estes, assistant, 
10. 11 Kate Sweet, 

11 Carrie A. Shaw, " 
11 Isabella F. Winslow, " 
1*2 Annie G. Brawley, ** 
V2 Edith K. Weeden, '• 
IH Marv J. Eldridge, 

l.S Caroline O.Bonnev. • 

i:^ Ruth E. Pease, 

i:^ Sara M. Hatch, 

T. S Lizzie E. Omev, 

S» Alice A. Richardson. •• 



131 Chestnut street, $750 

585 Purchase street, 550 

287 Kempton street, 5(K) 

i>4 State street, 550 

(►7 North street, 550 

(58 Walden street, 550 

(>14 Count V street, 5(K) 
200 South Second street, 550 

52 Bonne^' street, -i25 

H5S County street, 425 

121.'< Acushnet avenue. 450 

(W Thomas street, 000 

74.S County street, 425 



<Jannonville 



Rockdale avenue. 



10, 11 Adelaide J. McFarlin, principal, 
12, 13 Ethel W. Denham, assistant, 



Cottage street. 
363 Cottage street. 



$550 
425 



Dartmouth Street: 

Dartmouth street, corner of Hickory street. 



10 Isadore F. Eldridge, principal, 
10, 11 M. Eva Schwall, assistant, 

11 Edith M. B. Taber, • 

12 Annie F. Smith, 

12 Nellie H. Cook, 
12, 13 Mary C Barstow, 

13 Grace H. Potter, 
13 Sara H. Kelley, 



44 Sherman street. $7(M) 

11 Bonney street, 550 

S2 Walden street. 450 

IS Bonney street, .500 

<) South Ash street. 150 
.337 .South Orchard street, .^oO 

KM) Madison street. 5."»0 

24 Seventh street. ').'»() 



KoiRTH Street : 

Fourth street, corner of Madison street. 



11 
II 
]'l 

]:i 



Sarah H. Cranston, principal 
Eliza H. Sanford, assistant. 
Grace Covell, " 

Sarah E. Sears, 
Lillie C. Tillinghast. • 
Annie L. Macreading, - 



I2'.J Elm street. 
112 I'ourth street. 
12S School street. 
21 (rrilVin street. 
o.'i Walnut stitH't . 
17 Bunnev street. 



:s';.">0 
|.-)0 



108 superintendent's report. 

Sylvia Ann Howland : 

Pleasant street, between High and Kempton streets. 

10 Carrie E. Footman, principal, 72 State street, $HO0 

11 Mary J. Oraham, assistant, 12 Court street, 55(> 

12 Helen J. Kirk, 27 Franklin street, 550 
1.'^ Amelia Lincoln, •' 87 Walden street, 550 

LiNDKN Strekt : 

Linden street, near Ashland street. 

10 Elizabeth P. Spooner, principal, 129 Hillman street. $H(Kl 

11 Isabella Luscomb. assistant, 245 Cedar street, 550 

12 Isadora Foster, 48 Parker street, .55<l 

13 Lucv S. Leach, 91 Maxfield street, .550 
13 Ruth M. Tripp, 2:^8 Acushnet avenue, 40(» 

Merrimac Street: 

Merrimac street, corner of State street. 

10 Sarah H. Hewins. principal, 111 Merrimac street, $«iOO 

11 Addie West, assistant. 232 Pleasant street, 550 

12 Annie I. Dexter, '* 11 Franklin street, 55(> 

13 Harriet S. Damon. 223 Pleasant street. .550 

Maxfield Strkkt : 

Maxfield street, corner ot' Pleasant street. 

13 Mary B. White, principal, 57 Foster street, $lj(Kl 

12 Annie E. Pearce, assistant. 151 Hillman street. 550 

11 Clara C. M. Gage, 78 Mill street, .550 

10 Mary E. Pasho. ' 1<>9 Grinnell street, .500 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

Ael'MiNKI : 

Acushnet avenue 

C'li.u lotto C'. C'arr. principal, .")<» Spring street, $700 

\W\\v B. Whcclcr. assistant. 2 Mt. Vernon street. HOO 

Caroline (). Picnc. 1 Spruce street, 550 

Clakk's Puin i : 

Mai \ K. MiAuliiVf. |)riiuipal. 3S() Purchase street, $450 



superintendent's report. 109 

North : 

Marjr I. Ashley, principal, Clifford, $600 

Plainville : 

Mary E. Haney, principal, Shawmut, $575 

K.OCKDALE : 

Lillian T. Thomas, principal, Box 275, $500 

^*oRTH Mill : 

In Merrimac street school building. 

FLinma R. Wentworth, principal, 117 Hillman street, $15.50 per week, 
l^larv L. Hillman, assistant, 81 Mill street, 10.00 



a 



iSouTH Mill : 

In Thompson street school building. 

Lucy J. Remington, principal. Fifth street, $15.50 per week. 

Ruby M. Tripp, assistant, 407 Cedar street, 10.00 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

C^eorge H. Nye, $9.00 per week. 

Ocorge A. Stetson, 7.00 '• 

Catharine M. Crabtree, 6.00 

EVENING ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

l:-"iFTH Street : 

Oliver W. Cobb, $6.00 per week. 

iVlrs. C. T. Johnson, 8.00 

Grace H. Potter, 3.00 

X^illie C. Tillinghast, 3.00 

Clara B. WaUon, 3.00 

A.UCC A. Taylor, 3.00 

ICatc Moore, 3.00 

McUie H. Cook, 3.00 

Annie C.Hart, 3.00 

Mary J. Graham, 3.00 

Sarah E. Stoddard, 3.00 

Lizzie M. Briggs, 3.00 

Julia C. Gifford, 3.00 

Grace W. Russell, 3.00 

Annie L. Burbank, 3.00 



110 superintendent's report. 

Merrimac Street : 

MsLvy A. Kane, $«.00 per week. 

Alice A. Richardson, 3.00 

Harricl L. Cornell, 3.00 

Mabel L. Hathawav, 3.00 

Sarah E. Kirwin, 3.00 

Florence A. Poole, 3.00 

Charlotte M. Allen, 3.00 

Parker Street : 

George H. Tripp, $H.00 

Maria B. Clark, 3.00 

Emma D. Larrabee, 3.00 

Mary F. Wilde, 3.(K) 

Emma R. Wentworth, 3.00 

Julia W. Corish, 3.00 

Sara L. Tallman, 3.00 

Cedar Grove Street : 

Allen F. Wood, $0.0<» 

Zenas M. Briggs, 3.00 

Annie G. Brawlej, 3.00 

Nannie P. Slocum, 3.00 

Emma B. McCullough, 3.00 

Grace L. Carver, 3.00 

Mar>' R. Hincklev, 3.00 

Dora A.DeWolf, 3.00 

Flora E. Estes, 3.00 

Robert E. Washburn, 3.00 

Emma A. McAfee, 3.00 

Cora G. Binglev, 3.00 

Marv E. McAuliffe. 3.00 

Elizabeth D. Hicks, 3.00 

Lucia E. Bliss, 3.00 

Grace L. Bates. 3.00 

Abby R. Johnson. 3.00 



TH0M1\S0N StRKET : 

Joseph P. Kennedy, $0.00 

Mrs. K. K. Whelden, 3.00 

Janet Hunter, 3.(K) 

Emma L. Gartland, 3.00 



SUPERINTEXDEXT'S REPORT. 1 j | 

; M. King, 

Ring, $H.OO per week 

V. Hunt, ^00 

<. E. Kirwin, '^-^^ 

Comev, '"^'^ *' 

\In(iv, '^-OO «' 

1 H. Swasey, '^-^ 

innie Miirphv. '^'^^ " 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



lis 



uperintendent's Annual Report, 



FOR THE YEAR 1894. 



NEW BEDFORD: 
E. Anthony & Sons, Incorp., City Frintkkm. 

1895. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, 



TOGETHER WITH THE 




uperintendent's Annual Report, 



FOR THE YEAR 1894. 



NEW BEDFORD: 
E. Anthony & Sons, Incorp., City Printeks. 

1895. 



4 SCHOOL UEPORT. 

LOCATION OF CHILDREN BETWEEN FIVE AND FIFTEEN YEARS OP 
AGE AS REPORTED BY THE CENSUS OFFICERS. 





Attending 
Public Schools. 


Attending Private 
or Parochial Schools. 


Attending 
no School. 


Ward One, 


1,229 


1,642 


557 


Ward Two, 


467 


178 


92 


Ward Three, 


605 


44 


77 


Ward Four, 


411 


34 


64 


Ward Five, 


59:{ 


151 


105 


Ward Six, 


2,268 


666 


492 



6,563 2,716 1,387 

It is very evident from the school census of 1894 that 
the depression in business not only retarded the growth of 
population of the city, but also sent children into the pub- 
lic schools who had been at work and others who had been 
attending i)rivate and parochial schools. 

While the increase in the number of children in the city 
from the time the census was taken in 1892 to the time it 
was taken in 1893 was 861, for the same time between 
1893 and 1H94 it was only 199,— a difference of 662. The 
returns show also 209 decrease in the numl>er of pupils 
not attending any school, 37 increase in the number re- 
ported as attending i)rivate and parochial schools, and 371 
increase in the number reported as attending the public 
schools. 

It api)ears, then, that in times of depression some of the 
children who have been thrown out of employment re- 
enter the schools, and others go to the public schools who 
in a period of i)r()si)erity would go to private or parochial 
schools. 

The school census was taken in May by five census- 
takers, several of whom have performed this duty for 
several years, and the data secured by them is without 
d()ul)t very accurate. Their reports furnish no data, how- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 5 

ever, by which to verify the enrollment of pupils, and 
indeed cannot be made to do so. 

It may seem strange that each year so many pupils are 
reported who are attending no school. These pupils are 
of two classes : first, those between the ages of five and 
eight who are not compelled by law to attend school, and 
whose parents do not enter them ; second, those who have 
completed their school time after becoming thirteen years 
old. There may be a very small number who evade the 
laws in relation to attendance at school, but few such es- 
ca})e the notice of some of the school authorities. 

III. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION. 

High, 1 

Training school for teachers, 1 

Grammar, 5 

Primary, 12 

Country, 6 

Mill, 2 

26 
IV. SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

Occupied by the schools, 22 

ROOMS USED ^R SCHOOL PURPOSES (DAY SCHOOLS), INCLUDING 

HALLS AND RECITATION ROOMS. 

High, 17 

Training, 9 

Grammar, 42 

Primary, * 76 

Mill, 4 

Country, 8 

Manual training, 2 

Rooms unoccupied, 8 

Total, 165 

liooms used for both day and evening schools, 27 

Kooms used for evening drawing schools, 3 



SCHOOL REPORT. 





V. 


SEATS. 








Seats occupied. 


Seats unoccupied 


High school, 




858 


27 


Grammar schools. 




1,594 


239 


Primary schools, 




3,32G 


385 


Training school, 




325 


47 


Mill schools, 




no 


46 


Country schools. 




216 


m 



Total, 



5,929 



812 



VI. TEACHERS. 



Whole number in service, Dec. 21, 1894: 

High school. 
Training school, 
Grammar schools. 
Primary schools. 
Country schools, 
Mill schools, 
Special teachers. 
Temporary assistants, 
Evening s<;hool9. 



13 
10 
42 

78 

4 

4 
1 

61 



Total, 



VII. PUPILS. 



223 



DAY SCHOOLS, 1894. 

Whole number of pupils enrolled of all ages. 

Average number of pupils belonging, 

Average daily attendance, 

Per cent, of attendance. 

Number of half-days absence, 

Number cases of tardiness, 

Number cases of dismissal. 

Number cases of truancy reported by teachers. 

Number cases of corporal punishment, 

Number cases of suspension. 

Half-days absence of teachers. 

Number cases of tardiness b}- teachers. 

Number visits made the schools by the Superintendent, 

Number visits made the schools by the School Committee, 

Number visits made the schools by parents and others, 



7,426 

5,751 

6,270 

91.8 

176,508 

15,893 

31,950 

24b 

906 

18 

1,305 

157 

516 

451 

4,410 



SCHOOL REPORT. 7 

EVENING SCHOOLS, 1894. 

Whole number pupils enrolled, 1,968 

Average uumber belonging, 1,132.5 

Average nightly attendance, 912.1 

Per cent, of attendance, 80.5 

Total nighta absence, 6,711 

Number of ca^es tardiness, 326 

Number visits by Superintendent, 24 

Number visits by School Committee, 67 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL, 1894. 

Whole number pupils enrolled, 138 

Average number belonging, 71 

Average nightly attendance, 59.4 

Per cent, of attendance, 83.7 
Number visits made by the Superintendent, 3 

Number visits made by S<'hool Committee, 4 

COST OF INSTRUCTION PER SCHOLAR BY SCHOOLS. 

In this connection the cost of instruction per scholar is 
based upon the average number belonging to each school 
during the year, and the amount expended for hire of 
teachers, fuel, care of school houses, books and supplies 
(except those furnished from the income of the Sylvia 
Ann Howland fund), the term "care of school houses" 
including only the salaries of janitors. 

Elsewhere in the report is given the cost, by depart- 
ments, of each pujnl, based on the average number be- 
longing and the total amount expended for the mainte- 
nance of each department during the year. This last 
computation furnishes the l)asis upon which tuition of 
non-residents will be collected. 

Table I. This table is computed, as in former Reports, 
on the items classified above. 

ITie cost of maintenance of each pupil in the High school 
for the year has been 954.84 

Grammar department : 

Fifth Street, 27.13 

Middle Street, 28.04 



8 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Parker Street, 936.9» 

TbompaoQ Street, M.ll 

Cedar Grove Street, 19.96 

Harrington Training, 25.30 

Primary department : 

Harrington Training, 38.92 

AcushnetAveaue, 19.63 

W UeiLiHinlii. 17.30 

Cedar Street. 18.71 

Cedar Grove Street, 17.15 

Cannouvllle, 23.19 

Darlliioiitli Street, 16.86 

Fourth Street, 28.13 

S. A Ilowland. 23.39 

Undeu Street, 18,73 

Merrlniw .street. 21.32 

Muxtii^ldSll-eet, 25.38 

'ITionipson Street, 15.68 

Tograded Bchools : 

Aoufihnet, 32.32 

Clurk'B Point. 33.58 

North, 22.69 

Plainville, 44.69 

Roclidale, 32.17 

North Hill, 37.57 

South Mill, 22.16 

Evening sc-hooU : 

Cedar Grove Street, ' 3.TI 

FililiSlreet. 3J5 

M«rrimHL- Street, 3.76 

ParkerStrcet, hM 

'fhompion Street, 3.54 

Evening Drawing, 9.44 

The averHge «08t of a — 

Gramiimr school pupil was 926.12 

Primary sohool [>ii))i1 was J>.21 

t!ii)(niderl srhool pupil was 30.96 

MilUchool iwipll was 37.87 

KleiiK'Mnry.evciiing school pupil wan 3.73 

Evening diinvini! school pupil was 9.44 

The average uugt of u day school pupil was 25.33 



SCHOOL REPORT. 9 

Table II. The average cost per pupil by departments, 
based on the avemge number belonging and the total ex- 

I)enditure8 for each department, was as follows : — 

High school, $56.21 

Grammar schools, 26.26 

Primary schools, 20.93 

Ungraded schools. 34.67 

Evening elementary schools, 3.73 

Evening drawing school, 9.44 

Average cost of a day school pupil, $25.41 
Average cost of an evening school pupil, including draw- 
ing school, 4.06 

RECEIRTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR 1894. 

« 

RECEIPTS. 

General and special appropriations as follows : 

For teachers' salaries, $103,480.00 
Incidentals (including salaries of officers and janitors, 

books, supplies, etc.), 30,720.00 

Fuel, 5,160.00 

Repairs of buildings, 5,640.00 

Special appropriations : 

Fuel, 1,500.00 
Fitting and famishing rooms at Fourth street and Acush- 

net avenue, 5,800.00 

Balance of cooking school appropriation. 1893, 38.90 

Balance of manual training school appropriation, 1893, 988.43 



$153,327,33 
EXPENDITURES. 

For teachers' salaries: 

Day schools, $98,961.99 

Evening schools, 3,377.50 $102,339.49 

For incidentals: 

Salaries of officers, including truant officers and mes- 
senger, 5,654.79 
Salaries of janitors, day and evening schools, 11,651.95 
Books and supplies, 5,646.85 
Heating apparatus, 1 ,1 70.95 



10 SCHOOL KEPORT. 

Miscellaneous (including rent of school committee rooms 
and other rooms used for school purposes, lighting 
evening schools, janitors' supplies, school furniture, 
etc.), $6,720.34 

For fitting and furnishing rooms at Fourth street and 



Acushnet avenue, 
For repairs of buildings. 
For cooking school, 
For manual training school, 
For fuel. 




5,432.37 

5,140.55 

38.90 

752.97 

6,336.43 


Summary : 


$150,785.59 


Receipts, 
Expenditures, 


$153,327.33 
150,785.69 




DOG FUND. 






Balance, Jan. 1, 1894, 
Received, Feb., 1894, 
Expenditures for 1894, 


$3,306.28 
1,337.69 


$4,643.87 
1,011.67 



Balance, $3,632.20 

Received from non-resident pupils, which has been paid 
to the VAty Treasurer, and placed to account of unap- 
propriated funds, $968.04 
Received from books and supplies. 26.41 
Received from sale of stoves at William street, 28.00 
Received from sale of moulding table, 10.53 
Received from G. A. Bobrick, for school furniture, 7.63 



$1,040.61 
SYLVIA ANN HOWLAND EDUCATIONAL FL^ND. 

Balance of income on hand, Jan. 1, 1894, $207.25 

Interest for the year, 3,000.00 



$3,207.25 

Expenditures for the year, 3,190.25 



Balance, Jan 1, 1895, $17.00 

Cost of books and supplies during 1894, $3,190.25 

Cost of books and supplies in stock Jan. 1, 1894, 336.72 

$3,526.97 



SCHOOL REPORT. 11 

Cost of books and supplies charged to schools, 1894, $3,256,07 

Cost of books and supplies In stock Jan. 1, 1895, 265.94 

Cash receipts from sale of supplies, 4.96 



#3,526.97 

Disbursements to the several schools, and otherwise, 
are as follows : — 

High school, $491.55 

Fifth Street Grammar school, 185.26 

Middle Street Grammar school, 142.49 

Parker Street Grammar school, 123.33 

Thompson Street school, 438.71 

Harrington Training school, 162.53 

Acushnet Avenue Primary school, 91.57 

I. W. Benjamin Primary school, 140.56 

Cedar Grove Street Primary school, 285.44 

Cedar Street Primary school, 69.14 

Cannonville Primary school, 21.48 

Dartmouth Street Primary school, 182.76 

Fourth Street Primary school, 74.49 

S. A. Howland Primary school, 39.80 

Linden Street Primary school, 54.24 

Merrimac Street Primary school, 33.57 

Maxfield Street Primary school, * 47.12 

Acushnet school, 7.85 

Clark's Point school, 6.90 

North school, 63.50 

Plain ville school, 41.61 

Rockdale school, 10.19 

North Mill school, .75 

South Mill school, 22.92 

Manual Training school, 8.50 

Care of musical instruments, . 337.00 

Express and freight, 57.12 

Pedagogical library, 12.69 

Lectures, 60.00 

Covering and binding books, 4.25 

Miscellaneous supplies, 38.75 

Cash sales, 4.96 

Stock on hand Jan. 1, 1895, 265.94 

93,526.97 



12 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



DETAILED STATEMENT. 



Outlay by the School Committee from the income of 
the Sylvia Ann Howland fund, from Jan. 1, 1894, to 
Jan. 1, 1895: — 



BOOKS AND PERIODICALS. 



American Book Co., 
Allyn A Bacon, 
Boston School Supply Co., 
Damrell & Upham, 
Educational Publishing Co., 
Ginn A Co., 
Heath, D. C. & Co., 
Holt, Henry & Co., 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
Hutchinson A Co., 
Kellogg, E. L. & Co., 
Leach, Shewell & Sanborn, 
Jjee & Shepard, 
Lothrop, D. 4& Co., 
Little, Brown & Co., 
Maynard, Merrill & Co., 
New England i*ublishing Co., 
Prang Educational Co., 
Putnam's Sous, G. P. 
Potter & Co., John E. 
Porter & Coates, 
Silver, Burdett & Co., 
Schoeuhof , Carl, 
Taber, Kobert W. 
University Publishing Co., 



$74.31 

.8.00 

58.12 

n.75 

40.68 

58.64 

81.59 

3.50 

252.56 

32.35 

1.70 

77.84 

102.41 

.40 

5.15 

18.00 

14.50 

29.20 

8.55 

9.50 

2.16 

20.85 

56.36 

76.35 

16.67 



•1,061.14 



Heath, D. C. & Co., 
Hatch, VV. E. 
Kellogg, E. L. 4&Co., 
Putnam's Sons, G. P. 



l»EDAGOOICAL LIBRARY. 



LECTURES. 



$0.76 

5.00 
2.93 
4.00 



$12.69 



Boyden, Arthur C. 



$60.00 



SCHOOL REPORt. 13 



MUSIC. 

Ditson, Oliver & Co., 62.25 

Ginn & Co., 700.87 

Haynes, John C. & Co., 12.15 

Peirce, George 337.00 

Potter, Abby T. 250.00 61,302.27 

BINDING AND COVERING BOOKS. 

Buck, T. S. $3.00 

Kane, D. J. & Bro., 75.27 

Wing, Charles F. 4.13 682.40 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Dennison Manufacturing Co., 625.00 

Eagle Pencil Co., 3.21 

Perry, George 8. & Co., 113.25 6141.46 

APPARATUS. 

Eimer & Amend, 627.51 

Franklin Educational Co., 5.03 

Haskins, Charles N. ' 12.00 

King, J. D. 11.00 

Library Bureau, 10.25 

Mackie, James 1.00 

New Bedford Gas Light Co., • .90 

Queen & Co., 22.80 

Smith-Carleton Iron Co., 3.00 

Sherman, C. R. & Son, 3.75 697.24 

EXPRESS AND FREIGHT. 

Ditson, Oliver <fc Co., 60.10 

Eimer & Amend, .20 

Frost & Adams, .14 

Gray, Charles A. 5.80 

Hatch & Co., 34.70 

Jennings, William A. 16.00 

Prang Educational Co., .08 

Schoenhof, Carl .10 657.12 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Adams, Charles F. 657.50 

Brightman, F. S. 9.00 

Board of Topographical Survey, .75 

Caproni Bros., 7.30 



14 SCHOOL RRPORt. 

Frost & Adams, $2.00 

Heath, D. C. & Co., 9.62 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co., ' 82.36 

Hammett, J. L. 92.00 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., .50 

Lumbard, A. M. 71.85 

McAllister, T. H. 20.70 

Peirce, Edward M. 2.00 

Richter, George H. & Co., 11.23 

Taber, Robert W. 1.75 

Ullman Manufacturing Co., 6.71 $375.27* 

The balance unexpended of this fund has been gradu- 
ally growing less each year, and that of the present year 
is but $17. While the Committee expends this income 
each year in accordance with the terms of the bequest as 
it interprets these terms, it is evident that with the growth 
of the schools either certain expenditures now made from 
this income must be devoted to the text-book and supply 
account, or discontinued entirely. A considerable amount 
is now expended from this fund each year for music 
books. 

Although vocal music is not a study required by statute 
to be taught in the public schools, the School Committee 
has power by statute to require it to be taught, and, as it 
has done so, these books can be purchased from the regu- 
lar appropriation and the amount required for this puri)ose 
from the income of the Rowland fund might be used for 
Home other thingn which are desirable for the schools, but 
which cannot legally be purchased from the regular appro- 
priation. This is also true of the supplementary reading 
books which have always been purchased from the income 
of the Rowland fund. They can be legally purchased 
from the regular appropriations, and in most places are. 
In the past it has been a matter of expediency to purchase 
them from the income of the Rowland fund. Whether it 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



lo 



will !)e best to continue this practice mucli longer is a 
tjuestion worthy of consideration. 

TEXT- BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 



STATEMENT. 

Co8t of books and supplies purchased during 1894, 
Cost of books and supplies in stock Jan. 1, 1894, 



(>>st of books and supplies charged to schools in 1894, 
Cost of books and supplies in stock Jan l, 1895, 
Cash receipts from sale of books and supplies, 



$5,646.85 
1,296.18 



•6,943.03 

$5,866.94 

1,049.68 

26.41 

•6,943.03 



The cost in detail of books and 8U|){)lie8 furnished the 
several schools for the year 1894 is as follows : — 



High school. 

Fifth Street Grammar school, 
Middle Street Grammar school, 
Parker Street Grammar school, 
Thompson Street Grammar school, 
Acushnet Avenue Primary school, 
I. W. Benjamin Primary school. 
Cedar Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cannon ville Primary school, 
Dartmouth Street Primary school. 
Fourth Street Primary school, 
S. A. Howland Primary school. 
Linden Street Primary school, 
Merrimac Street Primary school, 
Maxfield Street Primary school, 
Harrington Training school. 
North Mill school. 
South Mill school. 
Acushnet school, 
Clark^s Point school, 
North school. 



Supplies. 


Books. 


Total. 


•623.6.3 


•698.50 


•1,592.12 


345.45 


462.91 


808.36 


231.67 


218.09 


449.76 


299.06 


•242.82 


541 .88 


200.19 


98.08 


29S.27 


64.98 


67.25 


132.23 


106.60 


108.87 


215.47 


58.00 


37.96 


95.96 


232.65 


140.54 


373.19 


20.20 


11.88 


32.08 


99.33 


82.53 


181.86 


50.81 


61.98 


112.79 


42.93 


43.36 


86.29 


;m.51 


36.33 


70.84 


47.92 


35.82 


83.74 


26.87 


25.06 


51.93 


154.98 


121.73 


276.71 


13.18 


5.S3 


19.01 


15.41 


34.21 


49.62 


49.62 


33.38 


83.00 


16.20 


18.42 


34.62 


31.12 


27.19 


58.31 



14 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Frost & Adams, $2.00 

Heath, D. C. & Co., 9.62 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co., * 82.36 

Hanimett, J. L. 92.00 

Hutchinson, H. S. & Co., .50 

Lumbard, A. M. 71.85 

McAllister, T. H. 20.70 

Peirce, Edward M. 2.00 

Richter, George H. & Co., 11.23 

Taber, Robert W. 1.75 

Ullman Manufacturing C'O., 6.71 $375.27 

The balance unexpended of this fund has been gradu- 
ally growing less each year, and that of the present year 
is but $17. While the Committee expends this income 
each year in accordance with the terms of the bequest as 
it interprets these terms, it is evident that with the growth 
of the schools either certain expenditures now made from 
this income must be devoted to the text-book and supply 
account, or discontinued entirely. A considerable amount 
is now expended from this fund each year for music 
books. 

Although vocal music is not a study required by statute 
to be taught in the public schools, the School Committee 
has power by statute to require it to be taught, and, as it 
has done so, these books can be purchased from the regu- 
lar appropriation and the amount required for this purpose 
from the income of the Rowland fund might be used for 
some other things which are desirable for the schools, but 
which cannot legally be purchased from the regular appro- 
priation. This is also true of the supplementary reading 
books which have always been purchased from the income 
of the Rowland fund. They can be legally purchased 
from the regular appropriations, and in most places are. 
In the past it has been a matter of expediency to purchase 
them from the income of the Rowland fund. Whether it 



SCHOOL HEPORT. 17 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 

The improvement in the quality of the sehoolhoiises of 
the city during the past few years has been very marked. 
Seven years ago there were in use a number of school- 
houses which were antiquated in their construction, inade- 
(]uate in their appointments, and whose sanitary conditions 
were a constant menace to the health of both pupils and 
teachers. Such were the Kem{)ton Street, the Grove, the 
Acushnet Village, the Arnold Street, the old Dartmouth 
Street, the old Fourth Street, and the William Street school- 
houses. These have either been re{)laced by buildings of 
modern constniction built on the same sites, or have been 
abandoned and the pupils tmnsferred to other and more 
suitable buildings. There remains within the city limits 
proper but one schoolhouse which is both old and inade- 
<juate for the needs of the district in which it is situated. 
This is the Linden Street schoolhouse. Another and 
more suitable lot has been purchased, however, in this dis- 
trict, and plans either have been or are about to be adopted 
for an eight-room brick building of modern design to be 
placed upon it. 

During this period of seven years the following entirely 
new brick schoolhouses have been built : the Harrington 
Memorial, the Isaac W. Benjamin, the Sylvia Ann How- 
land, and the Fourth Street. The following brick build- 
ings have been remodeled and enlarged : the Cedar Grove 
Street and the Acushnet Avenue. The Acushnet Village 
schoolhouse, a three-room w^ooden building, has been re- 
built, and the North and the Dartmouth Street school- 
houses, wooden buildings, have been enlarged. 

When the new schoolhouse is built to take the place of 
the one on Linden street, there will be few cities where 
the pupils will be better housed. In all the cases when 
new schoolhouses have been built or new ones remodeled ' 



18 SCHOOL REPORT. 

within the past few years, an effort has been made to con- 
struct them with duo regard to the best methods of heat- 
ing, lighting, and sanitation. If any of these buildings 
are failures in the above respects it is not because the.se 
matters have not received due consideration by the School 
Committees and the City (xovernments under whose ad- 
ministrations they have been built, but for other reasons. 

These new schoolhouses that have been built varv 
widely both in design and cost per foot of floor space - 
The contrast in these res{)ects is nuich more marked be- 
tween them than between those that were built earlier, as-* 
the Parker Street, the Middle Street and the Fifth Street 
schoolhouses. 

When a schoolhouse containing say eight rooms well 
heated, lighted, ventilated, and fitted with modern sanita— 
ries, can be built for from $30,000 to $85,000, why should 
nearly twice that sum be expended? Several of the recent 
schoolhouses have cost too nmch. The OTowin": needs of 
the city will not justify la\dsh expenditures for new school- 
houses. The School (Committee does not favor school 
houses so embellished that their cost is excessive, neither 
does it favor the erection of schoolhouses in which proi)or 
provision is not made for the health of teachers and pupils ; 
nor does it advocate buildin":s whose exterior is an eve- 
sore on account of cheapness of ccmstruction. 

An eiffht-room building constructed in conforniitv with 
modern ideas as to heat and sanitation and suflScientlv or- 
nate in its exterior apj^earance ought to \ye built for from 
$30,000 to $35,000 ; and a twelve-room building for from 
$40,000 to $45,000. There are such schoolhouses; then* 
are some in this city which are satisfactory, and their cost 
should serve as a limit in the construction of futun? school 
buildings here. 

The new Fourth Street schoolhouse and the enlarged 
and remodeled Acushnet Avenue schoolhouse were com 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 17 

8CHOOLHOUSES. 

The improvement in the quality of the schoolhouses of 
the city during the past few years has been very marked. 
Seven years ago there were in use a number of school- 
houses which were antiquated in their construction, inade- 
(|uat€ in their appointments, and whose sanitary conditions 
were a constant menace to the health of both pupils and 
teachers. Such were the Kempton Street, the Grove, the 
Acushnet Village, the Arnold Street, the old Dartmouth 
Street, the old Fourth Street, and the William Street school- 
houses. These have either been replaced by buildings of 
modern construction built on the same sites, or have been 
abandoned and the pupils transferred to other and more 
suitable buildings. There remains within the city limits 
proper but one schoolhouse which is both old and inade- 
(juate for the needs of the district in which it is situated. 
This is the Linden Street schoolhouse. Another and 
nu)re suitable lot has been {)urchased, however, in this dis- 
trict, and plans either have been or are about to be adopted 
for an eight-room brick building of modern design to be 
placed upon it. 

During this period of seven years the following entirely 
new brick schoolhouses have been built : the Harrington 
Memorial, the Isaac W. Benjamin, the Sylvia Ann How- 
land, and the Fourth Street. The following brick build- 
ings have been remodeled and enlarged : the Cedar Grove 
Street and the Acushnet Avenue. The Acushnet Village 
schoolhouse, a three-room wooden building, has been re- 
built, and the North and the Dartmouth Street school- 
houses, wooden buildings, have been enlarged. 

When the new schoolhouse is built to take the place of 
the one on Linden street, there will be few cities w^here 
the pupils will be better housed. In all the cases when 
new schoolhouses have been built or new ones remodeled ' 



18 SCHOOL KEPOHT. 

within the past few years, an effort has been made to con- 
struct them with due regard to the best methods of heat- 
ing, lighting, and sanitation. If any of these buildings 
are failures in the above respects it is not because these 
matters have not received due consideration by the School 
Committees and the City Governments under whose ad- 
ministrations they have been built, but for other reasons. 

These new schoolhouses that have been built vary 
widely both in design and cost per foot of floor space. 
The contrast in these respects is nuich more marked be- 
tween them than })etween those that were built earlier, as 
the Parker Street, the Middle Street and the Fifth Street 
schoolhouses. 

When a schoolhouse containing say eight rooms well 
heated, lighted, ventilated, and fitted with modern sanita- 
ries, can })e built for from $30,000 to $35,000, why should 
nearly twice that sum be expended? Several of the recent 
schoolhouses have cost too much. The growing needs of 
the city will not justify lavish expenditures for new school- 
houses. The School (Committee does not favor school 
houses so embellished that their cost is excessive, neither 
does it favor the erection of schoolhouses in which projyer 
provision is not made for the health of teachers and pupils ; 
nor does it advocate buildin«:s whose exterior is an eve- 
sore on account of cheapness of construction. 

An eight-room building constructed in conformity with 
modern ideas as to heat and sanitation and sufficientlv or- 
nate in its exterior appearance ought to be built for from 
$30,000 to $35,000 ; and a twelve-rocmi building for from 
$40,000 to $45,000. There are such schoolhouses; then* 
are some in this city which are satisfactory, and their cost 
should serve as a limit in the construction of future school 
buildings here. 

The new Fourth Street schoolhouse and the enlarged 
and remodeled Acushnet Aveiuie schoolhouse were com 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



21 



NEW BEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATING 

EXERCISES. 



JUNE 29th, 1894. 



PRAYER BY REV. M. C. JULIEN. 



1. SONG, ^' Gypsy Chorus" from "The Bohemian Girl." Balfe, 

By the School. 

2. SALUl^ATORY ADDRESS. 

Alice Maria Briohtman. 

3. ♦ORATION, " Athletics In Relation to School Work." 

Ernest Cushhan Read. 

A. SONG, '' Wiegenlied." Frank. 

By the School. 

5. ♦ESSAY, The Class Motto— '^ Vincit, qui se Vincit." 

Jane Witter Stetson. 

€. SONG, •' Where Are You Going To?" CaldicoU. 

By the School. 

7. BOURNE PRIZE ESSAY, ^'ITie Acadians." 

Sylvia Wood Paulding. 

^. SONG, Chorus from "Judas Maccabaeus." Handel, 

By the School. 

«. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

By His Honor Mayor Brownell. 



O. CLASS SONG. 



i Words by Susan Macomber Gifford. 
\ Music by Eva Jenks Lawton. 



Though to him who bravely struggles 

On the bloody battlefield, 
We may give all praise and honor, 

Though we may all glory yield 
To the hero, him who conquers 

By the might of spear and shield, 
Yet there is a nobler combat, 

Fought with weapons all may wield. 



Chorus : 



'n 



Vo conquer self, our noble aim. 
Our motto high and true ; 

A greater gain, than wealth or fame, 
The task we'll strive to do. 



*^*^ CUu» elect the Class Orator and the Class Essayist. 



22 ftCHOOL REPORT. 

'Tls to him who, never fliDching, 

Bears the burdens of the day, 
Who with patience, uncomplaining, 

Toils along the upward way, 
Who with hope and courage ever, 

Though the world may on him frown, 
Seeks the truth and holds it bravely 

That is given the victor's crown. Chorus, 

Then we'll rouse our strength for battle, 

Broader fields before us lie ; 
Far beyond them, brightly gleaming. 

Shines a glorious destiny. 
Press we onward ; if the march is 

Hard and long, be this our cry, — 
" After toil and trouble, surely. 

Then will come our victory." Chonttt, 

11. VALEDICTORY ADDRESS, '^Tomorrow to Fresh Woods and 
Pastures New.'' 

Bertha Chase Hathaway. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



23 



GRADUATES, CLASS OF '94, 



Vincit^ qui se VincU, 



Frederick Augustus Blossom, 
Harry Everett Boomer, 
Ira Mason Chace, Jr., 
Arthur Franklin Col well, 
Vernon Clifton Faunce, 
•John Ashley Gammons, 
Arthur Lawson Grieve, 
Krnest Bruce Hadley, 
•John Merrick Hathaway, 
Edward Howland Hicks, 
Charles Benjamin Hillmau, Jr., 
Frederick Woodman Jennings, 
William Jacob Knox, 
John Albert Lee, Jr., 
John Locke Martin, 
Georji^e Frederick Maxtield, 
Frederick Winthrop Morrison, 
Norman Beverly Nesbett, 
Ernest Cushman Read, 
Percy I^wrence Reed, 
i :iarence Spaulding Russell, 
Walter Kirk Smith, 
James Alexander Stetson, 
Walter Stanley Tripp. 

Gertrude Burgess Allen, 
Eugenia May Beetle, 
Carrie Wellwood Bliss, 
Carrie Gibbs Bly, 
Ethel Hatfield Booth, 
Jessie Nelson Braley, 



Alice Maria Brightman, 
Est«llaMaud Butts, 
Lizzie Almy Church, 
Grace Emerson Covill, 
Lurana Dennis Crapo, 
Florence Ladd Davis, 
Grace Winifred Dillingham, 
Anna Luella Field, 
Ethel Scars Gibbs, 
Susan Macomber Gilford, 
Bertha Chase Hathaway, 
Bertha Frances Hicks, 
Alice Maria Hillman, 
Julia Cushing Holmes, 
Mabel Kemp ton Howland, 
Annie Elizabeth Kasmire, 
Eva Jenks Lawton, 
Alice Macy, 
Edith May Pack wood, 
Sylvia Wood Paulding, 
Sarah Helen Phillips, 
Laura Marie Richardson, 
Lulu Florence Rider, 
Helen Robertson, 
Ethel Hathaway Rust, 
Nellie Mary Shirley, 
Jane Witter Stetson, 
Helen I^ouise Swift, 
Ida Seabury Tripp, 
Eunice Carver Upham, 
Mary Eleanor Wood. 



RECIPIENTS OF CERTIFICATES. 

Alice Mav Allen. Florence Anna Kelleher, 

Florence Morgan Anthony, Lucy Athearn Lewis, 

•losephine Hamilton Cobb, Gertrude Bosworth Sayer, 

Sylvia Margretta Hillman, Carrie Frances Wheeler, 

Henry Dean Waldron. 



24 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



NEW BEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

RATES OF TUITION FOR NON-RESIDENT PUPILS, 1895. 



Hi^h school. 
Grammar schools, 
Primary schools, 
Ungraded schools, 
Evening Drawing school, 



First 
Term. 


Second 
Terra. 


Third 
Term. 


$16.86 

7.88 

6.28 

10.40 


$16.86 

7.88 

6.28 

10.40 


$22.49 

10..50 

8.37 

13.87 



For the 
Year. 



$56.21 

26.26 

20.93 

34.66 

944 



SCHOOL REPORT. 25 

RULES GOVERNING TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

Maximum. Minimum. 

Principal of High school, 62,750 

Sub-master of " 1,600 

Teacher of science of " 1,600 

1L»ady assistants of '^ 900 $650 

Blilitary instructor of " 300 

Principals of grammar schools, 1,900 

^Assistants of grammar schools, 600 425 

Principals of primary schools, 600 to 800 

Assistants of primary schools, 550 375 

Principal of Training school, 1,500 

Assistant principal of Training school, 1,000 

Seniors in Training school, 4 per week. 

Juniors in Training school, 3 ^^ 

Ungraded schools, 525 to 700 

Principals of evening schools, 3 per night. 

Assistants of evening schools, 1.50 ^^ 

Supervisor of drawing in grammar and primary , 

schools, 1,200 

Teacher of drawing in High school and assist- 
ant, 800 

Supervisor of music. 1,500 for 4 days per wk. 

Teacher of sewing, 600 

Assistants at the rate of 525 

Cooking teacher, 600 

Manual training teacher, 1,200 

The salary of a primary school principal of a four- 
room building is $600 per year, which is increased at the 
rate of $25 for each additional room. 

The salaries of assistant teachers in the High school are 
increased at the rate of $50 per year until the maximum 
is reached. 

The minimum yearly salary of a grammar school assist- 
ant is fixed at $425, and the yearly advance is $25 per 
year until a yearly salary of $500 is reached ; the annual 
increase is then $50 per annum until the maximum ($600) 
is reached. 

The minimum yearly salary of a primary school assist- 



26 



SCHOOL RKPOBT. 



ant ia fixed at t375, and the yearly advance is $25 p^'^ 
year until a yearly salary of $450 ia reached; the annii**' 
inereatse b then $50 ])er annum until the maximum ($55C>) 
is reached. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

BRIEF DESCRIPI'ION OF THE 8CHOOLHOU8ES, WIT J 
THEIR ACCOMMODATIONS AND CONDITIONS. 









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SCHOOL REPORT. 27 

CALENDAR, 1895. 

Winter term begins January 7, 1805 ; ends March 29, 1895. 

Summer term begins April 8, 1895; ends June 28, 1895. 

<*all term begins September 8, 1895; ends December 20, 1895. 

VACATIONS. 

Idarch 30, 1895, to April 8, 1895. 
Fune 29, 1895, to September 3, 1895. 
December 21, 1895, to January 6, 1896. 

HOLIDAYS. 

2very Saturday ; Washington's Birthday ; Patriot's Day; Memorial 
y; from Wednesday noon before Thanlisglving the remainder of 
week. 

SCHOOL SESSIONS. 

llie grammar, Manual Training and Mill schools — From March 1, 
November 1, 9 o'cloclt a. m. to 11.45 o'cloclt A. M. ; 1.45 o'clock P. 
to 4 o'clock p. M. From November 1 to March 1, 9 o'clock a. M. to 
11.45 o'clock A. M. ; 1.30 o'clock p. m. to 3.43 o'clock P. M. 

The Primary schools — From March 1 to November 1, 9 o'clock a. 
to 12 o'clock M. ; 2 o'clock p. m. to 4 o'clock p. M. From Novem- 
• 1 to March 1, 9 o'clock a. M. to 12 o'clock M. ; 1.30 o'clock p. M. to 
o'clock p. M. 

ligh school — 8.30 o'clock a. m. to 1.30 o'clock p. M. during the 
lole year. 

The country school sessions shall be prescribed for each school by 
t Committee on Ungraded Schools. 

rhe signal for no-session is two strokes of the fire alarm once 
>eated (2-2). 

i¥hen given at 8.15 a. m. the morning session shall be omitted. 

SVhen given at 12.45 p. M. the afternoon session shall be omitted. 

Phis regulation does not apply to the High school, or to the un- 
ided schools unless designated by the Board. 

rhe no-session signal on stormy days shall not apply to the sessions 
the manual training or the cooking schools; and pupils attending 
)se schools shall not be excused from non-attendance upon them 
account of the no-session signal. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



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HiMim 


1 


III? 
111? 

illill 

1 mm 




■iii 

elilMlll 



I -S -SB 



* 



m 



t 



ma 



iwm 



I I I 



psSI 



I a^irisSi 



r 

i i I'i 




SCHOOL REPORT. 



Id tuaqoi 


S 


""•- 


ss 


i" 


d 


' Jl"Slf6IA -(l«* 




;.> 


• - 






-=- 


E- 


'^ 




llBTOl B1<|SIN 




s;i 


d 




q»iatnl l«Jod 










XsaalUl JO 










,.KTJfi 


■ 


-s 


a 




.rrTJfA 


ffi RSg 


li 


1 




4111^111 IBIOJ. 


ilSBi 


si 


1 




-« j«-)n« Ja.i 


ssrlas 


8S 


-_ SR 


• 


Xi?^B|'2'™.iV 


sa«s! 


ii 


a 


s 


aaiitBOlsqJ**! 


uiii 


ji 


i^ 


1- 


ill 


1 

'■S 


i'SES 


51 


« -s 


t 


SiSSi 


11 


is^s 


I 


11 1! 

ill 

lisle 1 






-"" 






1 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



31 



AVERAGE AGE OF PUPILS IN VARIOUS 

GRADES. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Senior 



Yrs. Mos. 



18 



Sob-Senior 



Yrs. Mo8. 



Junior 



Yrs. Mos. 



16 



Snb-Junior 



Yrs. Mos. 



15 



Average 
age 



Yrs Mos. 



16 9i 



GRAMMAR DEPARTMENT. 



School. 



fth Street. 
Iddle Street. 
irker Street, 
lompsnn Street. 
!tlar Grove Street. 
&rrlngion Memorial. 



Filth 


Sixth 


Seventh 


Eijghth 
l^ar 


Ninth 


Year 


Year 


Year 


Year 


Yrs. Mos. 


Yrs. Mos. 


Yrs. Mos. 


Yrs. Mos. 


Yrs. Mos. 


11 5 


11 7 


13 2 


18 11 


14 5 


11 6 


li 8 


13 3 


l4 


14 2 


11 7 


U 1 


13 10 


13 10 


14 3 


11 4 


12 5 


12 






10 7 


12 8 


li U 






11 3 


12 3 








11 3 


12 3 


1.3 3 


13 11 


14 3 



Average 
age 

Yrs. Mos. 

12 11 



13 
18 
12 
12 
11 



2 
2 
3 
1 
9 



12 7 



32 



SCHOOL RBFORT. 



AVERAGE AGE OF PUPILS IN VARIOUS 

GRADES. 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 





Firrt 


Second 


Third 


Fourth 


Average 


School. 


Year 

• 


Year 


Year 


Year 


age 




Yrs. Mo8. 


Yrs. Mos. 


Yrs. Mos. 


Yrs. Mos. 


Yrs.Mot* 


Acushnet Avenue. 


7 9 


9 4 


9 10 


10 9 


1 9 5 


I. W. Bei^Amin. 


6 11 


8 8 


10 8 


11 4 


» 5 


Cedar Grove Street. 


7 4 


10 5 


11 d 


IS 


10 3 


Cedar Street. 


7 1 


8 5 


9. 8 


10 8 


8 10 


Cannonville. 


6 10 


7 11 


9 1 


10 3 


K 6 


Dartmoath Street. 


7 1 


8 7 


9 5 


10 6 


1 8 11 


Fourth Street. 


7 1 


8 2 


10 1 


11 


9 1 


S. A. Howland. 


6 6 


8 


9 1 


11 2 


8 8 


Harrington Memorial. 


6 2 


7 11 


8 


10 6 


8 3 


Linden Street. 


6 8 


7 9 


9 6 


10 4 


8 7 


Merrimac Street. 


6 7 


7 5 


9 6 


10 2 


8 5 


Maxfield Street. 


7 8 


7 9 


9 3 


9 10 


i 8 6 


Thompson Street. 


« 7 


8 






1 7 * 




6 11 


8 4 


9 7 


10 9 


8 11 



UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 



Acushnet School. 
Clark's Point School. 
Plalnville School. 
Rockdale School. 
North School. 
North Mill School. 
South Mill School. 



Grammar 
Department 



Yrs. Mos. 



12 
12 
V2 
13 
13 



12 



7 
3 
6 
1 



Primary 
Department 



Yrs. Mos. 



8 
t 

8 
7 
8 



1 
3 
1 
6 



9 



Average age 



Yrs. Mos. 



10 
9 
10 
10 
10 
18 
14 

U 



4 


3 
3 

6 
9 



SCHOOL EEFORT. 



PAROCHIAL AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS. 



UEPORT FOR YEAR BEGINNING JANDARY 8, 1894, ENDING 
DECEMBER 21, ISM. 



r.^.,..sc.„o..„. 


ToUl 
(or year 
Boys tilrl- 


1- 


1 
1 


3 


1 


1 

1 


1 
il 

r 


1= 


r 

P 


1 

S 

5 


lit. Jotepb-t, 
St. Mary' a. 
»>cred Hean. 
St. ay»cli.th. 


IW 


189 


3S0 




H 


16 


70 


468 


is 


ifl 


w 




IMS 


laoT 


S«37 


3»SB 


M 


107 


ta 


m 


AM 


90 



34 SCHOOL REPORT. 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

SCIENCE. 

Appleton's Young Chemist. 

Remsen*8 Chemistry. 

Allen^s Laboratory Manual. 

Dana*8 Geological Story Briefly Told. 

Packard's Zoology. 

Youman-s Botany. 

Apgar's Plant Analysis. 

Avery's Natural Philosophy. 

Gillet and Rolfe's Astronomy. 

GEOGRAPHY. 
Guyot's Physical Geography. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. 

Dalton*8 Physiology and Hygiene. 
Hutchison^s Physiology and Hygiene. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Robinson's Arithmetic, Part IL 
Well's Academic Arithmetic. 
Went worth's School Algebra. 
Went worth's New Plane Geometry. 
Went worth's Plane and Solid Geometry. 
Wentworth's Trigonometry. 
Meservey's Bookkeeping. 
Meservey's Bookkeeping Blanks. 

HISTORY. 

Barnes's History of Ancient Peoples. 
Swinton's Outlines World's History. 
Lancaster's History of England. 
Fiske's History of the United States. 
Martin's Civil Government. 

ENGLISH. 

D. .1. Hill's Rhetoric and Composition. 
Whitney-Lockwood English Grammar. 
Lockwood's Lessons in English. 
Underwood's American Authors. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 35 

Inder wood's British Authors. 
Irook's English Literature. 
>owden'8 Shakespeare, 
[on roe's Sixth Reader. 

rving's Sketch Book. ^ 

*ongfellow'8 Evangeline, 
cott's Lady of the Lake. 
Vanklin's Autobiography. 
Bryant's Poems. 

[olrnes*s The Chambered Nautilus. 

x)weirs My Garden Acquuintauce, The Vision of Sir Launfal. 
laeaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome. 

hakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Midsummer Night's Dream, 
kddison's The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers. 

'ennyson's The Coming of Arthur, Elaine, Guinevere, 'ITie Pass- 
ing of Arthur, 
niton's Paradise Lost. Book L 
hakespeare's As You Like It and Julius Caesar. 
Chaucer's Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, 
penser's Faerie Queen, First Canto, 
•hakespeare's Hamlet. 
Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration, 
(urke's On American Taxation. 
Burke's On Conciliation with America. 

GERMAN. 

V^enckebach's Deutsche Grammatik. 

larris's German Lessons. 

leness's Der Neue Leitf aden . 

rrimm*s Haus Marchen. 

i^oethe's Hermann and Dorothea. 

Lhn Henn's German Rudiments. 

)tto's Geriuan Grammar. 

^ichendorf. Aus dem Leben Eines Taugenichts. 

tiehl. Der Fluch der Schonheit. 

;hamisso. Peter Schlemil. 

'reytag. Aus dem Staat Friedrich's des Grossen. 

leine. Die Harzreise. 

Joethe. Dichtung und Wahrhcit, Hermann und Dorothea. 

^ssing. Minna von Barnhelm. 

ichiller. Wilhelm Tell, Das Glied von der Glocke. 

iVenckebach. Lyrics and Ballads, Die Schonsten deutschen Lieder. 

GREEK. 
White's First Lessons in Greek. 



36 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Goodwin^s Greek Grammar. 

Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Goodwin's Xenophon and Herodotus. 

Boise's Homer's Iliad. 

Autenrieth's Homeric Lexicon. 

Crosby's Greek Lexicon. 

M^natt's Xenophon Hellenica, Books I-IV. 

WoodruflTs Greek Prose Composition. 

Perrin's Homer's Odyssey (for ** Homer at Sight "). 

Harper's Xenophon's Anabasis (for '* Xenophon at Sight"). 

LATIN. 

Collar & Danieirs First I^tin Book. 

Jones's First Lessons in Latin. 

Harkness's Latin Grammar. 

Allen & Greenough's Csesar. 

Greenough's VirgiL 

Harkness's Cicero. 

Jones's Latin Prose Composition. 

Lindsay's Nepos. 

Kelsey's Selections from Ovid. 

Harper's Virgil (for " Virgil at Sight "). 

FRENCH. 

Van Daell's French Grammar. 

Keetel's French Reader. 

Roulier's First Book in French Composition. 

Chardenal's French Course. 

Hennequin's Idiomatic French. 

Sauveur's Causeries avec mes El^ves. 

Spiers & Surenne's French Dictionary. 

Greville. Dosia. 

BedoUi^re. La M^re Michel. 

Hal%vy. Un Mariage d'Amour. 

About. La M^rc de la Marquise. 

Labiche. Le Voyage de M. Perrichon. 

Sand. Ija Mare au Diable. 

Erckmann-Chatrian. Lc Conscrit de 1813. 

Daudet. Le Si^ge de Berlin, La Derni^re Classe. 

M^rlinee. Colomba. 

De Vigny. Cinq Mars. 

De Ijamartine. Graziella. 

Dumas. La Tulipe Noire. 

Sandeau. Mademoiselle de la Seigli^re. 

Scribe et I^gouve. Bataille de Dames. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 37 

amartine. Jeanue d'Arc. 

A Fontaine. Fables, Books I and II. 

oli^re. 1/ Avare, l^e Bourgeois Gentilhomine. 

3rn^ille. Le Cid, Horace. 

acine. Andromaque, Iphigenie. 

ITPPLEMENTARY BOOKS USED IN THE HIG-H 

SCHOOL. 

ells's University Algebra. 

laavenet'S Geometry. 

alpole'8 Virgil, Book 1. 

>rague*s Masterpieces in English Literature. 

lott's Poems. 

>rague*s Paradise Lost, Books 1 and 2. 

udson's Shakespeare, Vols. I and 2. 

life's Childe Harold. 

>nier'8 History of English Literature. 

ty of the Last Minstrel. 

icar of Wakefield. 

lakespeare, by K. Grant White. 

artin's English Language. 

Tangos Exercises in English. 

Modern Classics : 

Goldsmith, Cowper and Hemans. 

Fouque and St. Pierre. 

Byron and Hood. 

Burns and Scott. 

Fields and Hawthorae. 

Holmes and Brown. 

Howells. 

Campbell and Rogers. 

Carlyle, Lamb and Southey. 

Wordsworth and Coleridge. 

Dickens and Fields. 

Whittier. 

Hawthorne and Carlyle. 
tiackeray^s Essays on Swift, Congreve, andJSteele. 
acaulay's Life and Writings of Addison, 
le Four Georges, Thackeray. 

laekeray's Essays on Prior, Gay, Pope, Hogarth, Smollett, Field- 
ing, Sterue and Goldsmith, 
ilton and Byron, Macaulay. 
r Roger de Coverly, from Spectator, 
acaulay^s Essay on Johnson. 



38 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Macaulaj^'s Essays on Goldsmith, Buiiyan and Madame D'Arblay. 

Goldsmith's Plavs. 

Goldsmith's Poems. 

Heath's German Dictionary. 

Boisen's German Prose. 

Wenckebach's Anschauung's Unterricht. 

Johnson's Schiller's Ballads. 

Sauveur's Contes Merveilleux. 

IjB Roi des Montagnes, About. 

La Litterature Fran^aise Contemporaiine, by Pylodet. 

La Litterature Fran^aise Classique, Mennechet. 

Emerson's Essays. 

Swinton's Word Analysis. 

S win ton's School Composition. 

American Poems. 

About Old Story Tellers. 

Anderson's Historical Readers. 

La Tour de la France. 

Perry's Bible Manual. 

Seaver & Walton's Metric System. 

Sawyer's Metric System. 

Model Etymology, Webb. 

Stein's German Exercises. 

Kellogg's Rhetoric. 

Smith's Principia Latina. 

Craik's English of Shakespeare, Julius Caesar. 

Jackson's Mathematical Geography. 

Shaler's First Book in Geology. 

Collar's Practical Latin Composition. 

Gray's Lessons in Botany. 

Earl of Chatham, Macaulay. 

Courtship of Miles Standish. 

Emerson's American Scholar. 

Comus. 

Lodge's Mechanics. 

Hall & Bergen's Physics. 

The House of the Seven Gables. 

Fisk's Civil Government. 

Luquion's French Prose. 

The Abbott, by Scott. 

Whitney's The Essentials of English. 

Carhart «fc Chute's Physics. 

Appleton's School Physics. 

Macaulay's Essays— Milton and Addison. 

The Foundations of Rhetoric, by A. S. Hill. 



8CI100L RErOKT. 39 

[rving'8 Tales of a Traveller. 

The Plague Year, by DeFoe. 

Arnold's Sohrab & Rustum. 

Scott's Woodstock. 

$ilas Marner, George Eliot. 

Uontgomery's Treading Facts of English History. 

Smith's Smaller History of Greece. 

jra3''s Botany. 

»Vells- Geometry. 

ierlitz Methode fllr den deutschen Unterricht, Zweiter Theil. 

rEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

•^raiiklin New Third Reader, 
"raiikliu New Fourth Reader, 
"raiiklin New Fifth Reader, 
•^runklin Sixth Reader. 
Bradbury's Eaton's Elementary Arithmeti*;. 
Bradbury's Eaton's Practical Arithmetic. 
leaver & Walton's Mental Arithmetic. 
Varreo's Connnon School Geography. 
larper's Introductory Geography. 
V€»reest«'r's School Dictionar}'. 
Barnes's History of the United States. 
f ycie's Language lessons, Part I. 
lyde's T.anguage Lessons, Part IL 
Ijde'ft r^anguage T/e.'isons, Advanced, 
larrington's Speller, Parts I and IL 
'hild'.*^ Health Primer. 
-*rang's Drawing Books, 
riarper's VVriting Books. 

^UPPLEMENTAkY BOOKS FOR REAI)IX(; AM) 
STUDY USED IN THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Eggleston's First Book in American History. 

Higginson's History of the United Stai<»s. 

Goodrich's Child's History of the United States. 

Dickens' Child's History of England. 

Andersen's Historical Reader. 

Collier's British History. 

McKenzie's America. 

Bailouts Footprints of Travel. 

^HSide and Way Side, Part 1 1. 

^-aside and Way Side, Part III. 

Wild's Book of Nature, Parts I, II, III, IV. 



40 SCHOOL REPORT. 



Choice Readings in Nature's Book. 

Jolionnot's Geographical Reader. 

Scribner's Geographical Reader. 

Our World, Part I. 

Our World, Part II. 

Fables and Folk Stories. 

Kingsley^s Water Babies. 

Longfellow Leaflets. 

Tanglewood Tales. 

Grandfather^s Chair. 

True Stories. 

Robinson Crusoe. 

Golden Book of Choice Readings. 

American Authors. 

Swinton^s Book of Tales. 

Swinton's Supplementary Reader. 

Swinton's American Classics. 

Swinton's English Classics. 

Smss Family Robinson. 

McGufiey's Fourth Reader. 

McGuffey's Fifth Reader. 

McGufiey-s Sixth Reader. 

Harvey's Fourth Reader. 

Sheldon*s Fourth Reader. 

Sheldon's Fifth Reader. 

Royal Fourth Reader. 

Washington Irving's Sketch Book. 

Lincoln's Gettysburg. 

Arabian Nights. 

Vicar of Wakefield. 

King of the Golden River. 

Church's Old World Stories. 

Hans Brinker. 

Black Beauty. 

Little Men. 

Little Flower People. 

Little Lord Fauntleroy. 

Heroic Ballads. 

At the Back of the North Wind. 

Stories of Industry. 

Bluejackets of 1776. 

Blue Jackets of 1812. 

Bluejackets of 1861. 

World at Home, Europe. 

World at Home, The World. 

Peasant and Prince 

Prince and Pauper. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 41 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Franklin New First Reader. 
FrantLlin New Second Reader. 
Franklin New Third Reader. 
Harrington*s Speller, Part I. 
Prince's Arithmetic, Part II. 
Prince's Arithmetic, Part III. 
Prang's Drawing Books. 
Harper's Writing Books. 

SUPPLEMENTARY READING BOOKS USED IN 

THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Monroe's Primer. 

Monroe's First Reader. 

Monroe's Second Reader. 

Monroe's Third Reader. 

Parker & Marvel's First Book. 

I*arker & Marvel's Second Book. 

Sheldon's Second Reader. 

Sheldon's ITiird Reader. 

Applcton's First Reader. 

Appleton's Second Reader. ^ 

Appleton's Third Reader. 

Swinton's Second Reader. 

Swinton's Third Reader. 

Willson's First Reader. 

Willson's Second Reader. 

Willson's Third Reader. 

Butler's First Reader. 

Butler's Second Reader. 

Stick ney's First Reader. 

Stickney's Second Reader. 

Holmes's First Reader. 

Holmes '8 Second Reader. 

Harper's First Reader. 

Harper's Second Reader. 

Normal Primer. 

Normal First Reader. 

Barnes's First Reader. 

Barnes's Second Reader. 

Barnes's Third Reader. 

Modern Second Reader. 

First Term's Work in Reading. 



42 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Easy Steps for Little Feet. 

Seven Little Sisters. 

Each and AIL 

Andersen's Fairy Tales. 

Robinson Crusoe (in one syllable). 

King's Picturesque Geography. 

Seaside and Wayside, Part I. 

Baker's Young Folks' Geography. 

Fables and Folk Stories. 

Wood's Natural History First Reader. 

Wood's Natural History Second Reader. 

Heart of Oak Series, No. I. 

Heart of Oak Series, No. 2. 

Verse and Prose for Beginners. 

^Esop's Fables, Vols. L and H. 

Grimm's Fairy Tales. 

Legends of Norseland. 

pp:dagogical librarv. 

Books added during the year are as follows : — 

224 Trees of North Eastern America. Charles S. Newhall. 

225 Shrubs of North Eastern America. Charles S. Newhall. 

226 Hudian Body. Martin. 

227 Commissioners' Report on Manual Training. 

228 Report of the Committee of Ten. 

229 Talks on Pedagogics. Col. Parker. 

230 Talks on Pedagogics. Col. Parker. 

231 Talk« on Pedagogics. Col. Parker. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 43 

SCHOOL BOARD, 1894. 

STEPHEN A. BROWNELL, Mayor, Chairman, ea- oj^cio. 



ROBERT W. TABER, VIce-Chalrman. 



WILIJAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 



JOHN H. BARROWS, President of Coojmon Council, ex officio. 



Ward 1 — Louis Z Normandln, Anna R. Borden, John H. Lowe. 

Ward 2 — Frank A. Milliken, Edward T. Tucker, Isaac B. Tompkins, Jr. 

Ward 3— William H. Pitman. Stephen H. Shepherd, William R. Chan- 
nin<^. 

Ward 4 — Seth W. Godfrey, George H. Dunbar (deceased), George H. 
Batchelor, William E. Brownell. 

Ward 5 — William L. Sayer (resigned), Sylvia B. Knowlton, Robert 
W. Taber, Jonathan Howland, Jr. 

Ward 6 — Francis M. Kennedy, Joseph C. Pothier, Betsey B. Winslow 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
William E. Hatch. Secretary. 

The flrst named on each standing committee is Chairman of the same. 

On High *9c^ooi — Pitman, Dunbar, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, 
Tompkins, Shepherd, Sayer, Howland. 

On Grammar Schools — Tompkins, Pitman, Howland, Dunbar, liOwc, 
Mrs. Borden, Sayer. Milliken, Channing. 

On Primary Schools — ^hepherd, Tompkins, Miss Winslow, Mrs. 
Borden, Kennedy, Godfrey, Channing, Tucker, Taber. 

On Ungraded Schools — Lowe, Mrs. Borden, Howland, Brownell, 
Taber, Pothler, Godfrey, Tucker, Normandln. 

On Training School — Milliken, Kennedy, Pitman, Sayer, Channing, 
Brownell, Miss Winslow, Pothier. 

On Truants — Godfrey, Channing, Tucker, Pothier, Normandln. 

On Evening Schools — Kennedy, Lowe, Godfrey, Channing, Tucker, 
Pothier, Normandln. 

On Music — Mrs. Borden, Godfrey, Shepherd, Brownell, Taber, 
Pothier, Normandln. 



44 SCHOOL REPORT. 

On Manual Training — Sayer, Miss Wlnslow, Dunbar, Godfrey, 
Mrs. Borden, Tucker, Normandin, Kennedy. 

On Examination of Teacher*— Dunbar. Miss Wlnslow, Mrs. Borden, 
Tucker, Brownell, Mil liken. 

On 7>irt-5ooifca— Pitman, Kennedy, Milliken, Tx>we, Sayer, Brown- 
ell, Pothier, Tucker. 

On Expenditures — Howland, Tompkins, Pitman, Tx)we, Sfiepherd, 
Kennedy, Milliken, Taber, Barrows. 

On Howland Fiiitd — Tompkins, Pitman, Dunbar, Shepherd, Ken- 
nedy, Taber, Howland, Barrows, Milliken. 

On Rules — Taber, Dunbar, Milliken. 

On Pay-Bolls — Toni])kins, Howland, Taber. . 



SCHOOL REPORT. 45 

SCHOOL BOARD, 1895. 

DAVID L. PARKER, Mayor, Chairman ex officio. 



FRANK A. MII-LIKEN, Vice-chairman. 



WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 

Office 133 Williaiu street. 
Office Hours, 8.30 to 9 A. M., 12.30 to 1 P. M, Saturday «*, 9 to 9.30 A. M. 



OLIVER PRESCCrr, Jr., President of tlie Common Council ez officio. 

Ref^iilnr meetings of the BoanI, first Monday of each month at 7.30 p.m., except 

in months of January and August. 



WARD ONE. 

Name. Place of businesH. Residence. 

fJeorge W. Hillman, 1086 Acushnet avenue. 

I^ouis Z. Normandin, 584 Purchase street, 686 Purchase street. 

Anna R. Borden, Ashland and Austin sts. 

WARD TWO. 

Isaac B.Tompkins, Jr., 78 Union street. 691 County street. 

Frank A. Milliken, 43 William street, 290 Pleasant street. 

XCdwaixi T. Tucker, 258 Pleasant street, 268 Pleasant street. 

' WARD THREE. 

AVilliani R. Channing, 192 Union street, 91 Mill street. 
William H. IMtman, Five Oents Sav'gs Bank, 60 Chestnut street. 

Stephen H. Shepherd, Standard office, 154 Maxfleld street. 

WARD FOUR. 

Ada W. Tillinghast, 37 Eighth street. 

>5eth W. Godfrey, 429 Union street. 
Oeorge H. Batchelor, Institution for Savings, 187 Cottage street. 

WARD FIVE. 

^lonathun Howland, Jr., 54 Russell street. 

Sylvia B. Knowlton, 348 Union street. 

Bobert W. Taber, 28 Pleasant street, 48 Fifth street. 

WARD SIX. 

Betsey B. Winslow, 315 County street. 

Francis M. Kennedy, Eddy Building, 93 Washington street, 

•loseph C. Pothier, 247 Fourth street, 247 Fourth street. 



EMMA M. ALMY, Superintendent's Clerk. 

HENRY SMITH, Truant Officer, 372 Cottage street. 
Office Hours, 12.80 to 1 P. M.; Saturdays, 9 to 9.30 a. m. 

OEORGE K. DAMMON, Messenger and Truant Officer, 137 Smith st. 



4fi SCHOOL REPORT. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 
William E. Hatch. Secretary. 

The first nameil on each Standing Committee is Chairman of the same. 
On High School^ Pitman, Howland, Miss Wlnslow, Mrs. Borden. 
Tompkins. Sliepherd, Batchelor, Channing, Milliken. 

On Grammar Schools — Tompkins, Pitman. Howland, Mrs. Borden, 
Milliken, Tabcr, Channing, Mrs. Knowlton. Shepherd. 

On Primary Schools — Shepherd, Tompkins, Miss Winslow, Mr?. 
Borden, Kennedy, Godfrey, Channing, Tucker, Taber. 

On Ungraded Schools — Mrs. Borden, Howland, Godfrey, Pothier, 
Taber, Tucker, Normandin, Mrs. Tillinghast. 

On Training ^cAoo? — Milliken, Pitman, Kennedy, Miss Winslo^> 
Channing, Pothier, Mrs. Knowlton, Hillmau 

On Truants — Godfrey, Pothier, Normandin, Mrs. 'Hllinghast. 

On Evening Schools — Kenr.edy, Hillman, Godfrey, Tucker, Pothi-^^^' 
Normandin, Mrs. Knowlton, Mrs. Tillinghast. 

On Music — Batchelor, Mrs. Borden, Godfrey, Shepherd, Tab^^^^' 
Pothier, Normandin, Mrs. Knowlton. 

On Manual Training — Uillman, Miss Wlnslow, Batchelor, K^:^^"' 
nedy, Godfrey, Tucker, Normandin, Mrs. Knowlton. 

On Examination of Teachers — Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Tuck*-^ ^^' 
Batchelor, Mrs. IMlliughast. 

On 7'«r/-5ooA» — Pitman, Kenndy, Milliken, Pothier, Tucker, M' ^ 
Knowlton, Mrs. Tillinghast, Flillman. 

On Expenditures — Howland, Tompkins, Pitman, Shepherd, Kfc— ^ •*"' 
nedy, Milliken, Taber, Channing, Prescott. 

On Howland Fund — Tompkins, Howland, Pitman, Shepherd, Kc^^^"' 
nedy, Milliken,, Channing, HlUman, Prescott. 

On JRules — Taber, Tucker, Pothier, Batchelor, Hillman. 



SCHOOL ICKl-OBT. 




DR. GEORGE H. DUNBAR. 

DIED FEBRUARY 23. 1894. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 49 



IN MEMORIAM. 

RESOLUTIONS 
Passed by the School Board of the City of New Bedford^ Feb. 23^ 1894. 

While the Board from time to time has been called upon by the 
common fate that pertains to humanity to mouri^the loss of some hon- 
ored member, in the death of our colleague, the Hon. George H. 
Dunbar, there is unusual cause for sorrow. 

Formal resolutions are inadequate to express the value of Dr. 
Dunbar's services to the public schools of New Bedford. For 
twenty-seven years a member of this Board, the last twenty-five of 
which were continuous, his time, his sound learning, his ripe experi- 
ence, and his wisdom, were unselfishly devoted to the cause of popular 
education. In the performance of his duty he was equally fearless in 
Attacking that which appeared to him to be wrong or defending that 
which he considered to be right. He did not wait before passing, his 
disapproval or giving his sanction to know whether his acts would 
meet with popular approval or not. He moulded public opinion in- 
stead of being controlled by it. These qualities, too infrequent in 
public officials, made him an invaluable servant of the people. 

But his services as a school official were not confined simply to legis- 
lation in the Committee rooms. With leisure at his command, and 
possessing an innate love for children, he was frequently to be found 
in the schoolroom. His experience and judgment made him a wise 
counselor for the teachers, and his evident interest in the welfare of 
the children made him a welcome visitor to them. 

For years to come the public acts of our lamented colleague will be 
a source of inspiration to the members of this Board, and his private 
virtues a most delightful memory. 

The heartfelt sympathy of this Board goes out to the relatives of 
our friend and brother. To them is the consolation that his years 
were replete with the faithful performance of both his private and 
public duties. 



SCHOOL IIBI-ORT. 




DR. GEORGE H. DUNBAR. 

DIED FEBRUARY 23, 1894. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Dl? 



/ X 



RINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, 



FOR THE YEAR 1894. 



■ i'. 

I 
'i 

If 



il 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THK 



D 



ERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



FOR THE YEAR 1894. 



<v 



i 



Report of the Superintendent. 



To the Schofjl Committee: 

Ladies and Gentlemen, — My seventh annual Report 
is herewith submitted. It is the thirty-fourth of the 
series of annual reports of the Superint<»ndent of Schools 
of the citv. 

It gives me pleasure to report that the schools are in 
excellent condition. The spirit that pervades both teach- 
ers and pupils is good. Discontent and murmuring on 
the part of either are the exception and not the rule, and 
the work during the past year has been productive of 
good results. This is a period of educational change, and 
certain new departures have been made during the year in 
the schools which are in line with the best educational 
thought of the day. Some of these changes have been 
under contemplation for some time. The most important 
are: (1) the adoption of a new cDurse of study for the 
High school, which in its general plan follows the recom- 
mendations of the *' Committee of Ten " ; (2) the revision 
of the rules and regulations of the Board and the adop- 
tion of a provision by which the standard of admission to 
the teaching corps has been materially raised; (3) the 
opening of the Manual Training school for the boys of the 
three highest grammar grades ; (4) the adoption of the 
departmental plan of instruction for the grammar schools. 



54 superintendent's report. 

While innovations in school work should not be entered 
upon without due consideration and for the sake of change 
simply, more than in any other great business corpora- 
tion, there come times when failure on the part of those 
in control of the schools to read the signs of the times 
means educational loss to the pupils in one case, as it 
means financial loss to the stockholders in the other. It 
may seem to some as if within a few years there had been 
more radical changes in methods and lines of work in the 
schools of the city than were necessary. But we have 
really done but little pioneer work here during that time. 
The paths have been well cleared and defined by others 
l)efore we have entered upon them. When music, draw- 
ing, and sewing were introduced into the schools, New 
Bedford became nearer being an educational pioneer than 
she has been since. And while I feel that our schools to^ 
day are in the van of educational progress, a wise con- 
servative spirit has governed all new departures, and 
no important educational movement adopted by your 
Board during recent years has as yet proved to be an 
unwise one. 

■ 

ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 

OF THE CITY. 

By the couitesy of those in charge of the private and 
parochial schools I am able to give the attendance of 
pupils in all the schools in the city. Undoubtedly some 
pupils are enrolled in both the public and in some of the 
other schools, making the figures under the head of enroll- 
meid somewhat larger than the actual number of different 
pupils in the city who attended school during the year. 
The other items, however, are without question substsin- 
tially correct, and are substantiated by the reports of the 
census officers. 



superintendent's kei*ort. 55 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 





1894. 


1893. 




Gain. 


Eorolliuent of pupils, 


7,426 


6,884 




542 


Average number belonging, 


5,720 


5,543 




177 


Average dally attendance, 


5,2.51 


4,985 




266 


Per cent, of attendance, 


91.8 


89.9 




1.9 


Number caseA of tardiness, 


15,893 


15,249 




544 


Number cases dismissals. 


31,950 


26,545 




5,405 


PRIVATE AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. 




• 




1894. 


1893. 






Enrollment of pupils. 


2,852 


2,922 


70 Loss. 


Average number belonging, 


2,472 


2,694 


222 


ii 


Average daily attendance, 


2,272 


9,281 


9 


it 


Per cent, of daily attendance. 


92 


85 7 per 


cent, 


, Gain. 



PUBLIC, PRIVATE, AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. 

1894. 1893. 

Enrollment of pupils, 10,278 9,806 472 Gain. 

Average number belonging, 8,167 8,237 70 Loss. 

Average daily attendance, 7,523 7,267 256 Gain. 

Per cent, of dally attendance, 92 88 4 per cent. Gain. 

A more comi)lete report of the attendance of pupils in 
the schools is given in the tables following the Secretary's 
report. 

There is a constant increase in the attendance upon the 
public schools. During the last year the private and 
parochial schools show a small decrease, due probably to 
the business depression. The abnormal increase in the 
item of enrollment in the public schools is due unquestion- 
ably to two causes : first, a shifting of population caused 
by the temporary closing of the mills ; second, by the 
temporary attendance of some pupils who afterwards 
returned to the parochial schools. 

There is an improvement shown in the per cent, of 
attendance, but in two matters of e(iual importance there 
has been a continual increase in the wrong direction. I 
refer to the cases of tardiness and dismissal. There were 



56 supkrintendent's report. 



i - 



15,893 cases of the first, and 81,950 eases of the last, — 
an increase for the year of 544 cases of tardiness and 
5,405 cases of dismissal. 

I know that the teachers use all the means in theit 
power to secure punctuality. They try persuasion, incen- 
tives and coercion, but without avail, as the returns show 
I fear that very many parents do not realize the necessit^^ 
of their earnest cooperation in this matter of tardinest^ -* 
nor can I believe that even half the cases are tho 
of necessity. Unless parents will recognize that th 
habit of punctuality is one that should be implanted i^^' ^^ 
children and will work with the teachers to secure it, th^ — ^^ 
results will never be satisfactory. 

The dismissals have increased until they have l>ecome o ^ri^ot 
real detriment to the schools. In some of the schools M •^^ 
located in the mill districts whole rooms are almosr .^=^ •'^^ 
emptied of })U})ils fifteen minutes each day before th^^^JT*^ 
closing hour. This means a loss of two weeks actua-^^-*** 
school time in the year to those who are dismissed, to saj^-^^*) 
nothing of the disturbance and loss by interruption U :^-^^ ^^ 
those who remain. These same children who are dis-J^^ •^ 
missod each day to carry dinners are often absent also ^-^^ ^^ 
and their continual loss of time has the effect of retard — 9^- 
in^ the work of all those in the schools which thev^i!^^^ 
attend. The other regular dismissals ai'e caused by th^^ ^^^ 
pu})ils carrying the daily papers and taking music anct"^^^ " 
dancing lessons in school hours. 

I realize that many of the cases of dismissal of pupils 
to carry dinners are necessary, and I see noway to remedy 
this evil except by a change in the hours for school 
sessions in some primary schools. Neither do I wish to 
condenui in general terms the action of parents who have 
their children dismissed for the other purposes which I 
have enumerated. But I do think that some pupils are 
dismissed to carry papers who are not in real need of the 



superintendent's report. 57 

pittance they earn in that way, and whose ultimate good 
lemands their constant attendance at school in school 
lours. I believe also that it would be possible for pupils 
:o acquire the accomplishments of dancing and music out- 
-lide of school hours if parents would only think so and 
lemand it. Upon them must rest the burden of reform 
in this matter of dismissals as well as in that of tardiness. 

ACTS 1894, CHAPrER 498. 

An Act Relative to the Attendance of Children in the Schools. 

* 

Section 1. Every person having under his control a ehiW between 
;he ages of eight and fourteen years, and in every city and town 
where opportunity is furnished, in connection with the regular work 
)f the public school, for gratuitous instruction in the use of tools or 
n nmnual training, or for industrial education in any form, a child 
Detween the ages of eight and fifteen years, shall annually cause 
mch child to attend some public day school in the city or town in 
ivhich he resides, and such attendance shall continue for at least 
;hirty weeks of the school year, if the schools are kept open for that 
ength of time, with an allowance of two weeks' time for absences 
lot excused by the superintendent of schools or the school committee. 
^ui*h period of attendance shall begin within the first month of the 
fall term of school, and for each five days' absence of any such child 
heresifter, in excess of the above allowance, before the completion of 
;he required annual attendance of thirty weeks, the person having 
mch child under his control shall, upon the complaint of the school 
committee or any truant oflftcer, forfeit to the use of the public schools 
)f such city or town a sttm not exceeding twenty dollars ; but if such 
;hild has attended for a like period of timo a private day school 
ipproved by the school committee of such city or town, or if such 
;hild has been otherwise instructed for a like period of time in the 
tranches of learning required by law to be taught in the public 
schools, or has already acquired the branches of learning required by 
law to be taught in the public schools, or if his physical or mental 
condition is such as to render such attendance inexpedient or imprac- 
ticable, such penalties shall not be incurred. 

TRUANCY. 

Notwithstanding the earnest efforts of the te-achers and 
the vigilance of the truant officers truancy seems to 
increase. There were twenty-seven more cases reported 



58 StlPERlNTEKDENT^S REPORT. 

by the teachers for this j^ear than for the previous one, or 
245 cases in all. The truant officer investigated 714 
cases of absence reported by teachers, and found that 119 
were tiniants. The difference in number between his 
report and that of the teachers represents those pupils 
who returned to school before they were investigated by 
him, and also the difference between the number of indi- 
viduals who played truant and the number of actual cases 
of truancy, each half day of absence being considered a 
case of truancy. • 

I do not know what more can be done to make truancy 
less frequent. I find often upon investigation that the 
truants do not absent themselves from school because it is 
particularly disagreeable to them, but for other reasons. 
They remain out to earn a little money with which to go 
to the sho}t\ or to the circus, or to the ball game, or to the 
polo game, or because they have not the will power to re- 
sist the influence of some other truant or shiftless boy 
who has completed his school time and is making a pre- 
tence to work, but w^ho idles most of his time. Cases 
arise from })ure shiftlessness on the part of the parents, 
who in their ignorance or degradation seem to care little 
what becomes of their children. Occasionally I find a 
case where the child claims that he does not go to school 
because he does not like the teacher, or because the work 
is discouraging, but these cases are rare. The great 
majority of teachers do all within their power to make 
their schools attnictive to the pupils, and the cause of 
tniancy lies to a great degree without the school. Its 
main cause is to be found in the home. The children 
whose homes are those wherein temperance and happiness 
prevail are seldom if ever tiniants, but those who come 
from homes where intemperance, or discord, or shiftless- 
ness, one or all j)revail. 

The oflicers have been faithful and zealous in the per- 



superintendent's report. 59 

forinance of their duties. Their statistical reports are 
given l>elow. 

KEPORT OF HENRY SMITH, TRUANT OFFICER. 

Schools visited, 1,413 

Absences reported by teachers, 714 

Absences without permission of parents, 119 

Second offences, 28 

Third offences, 16 

Parents notified, 739 

Taken to school from street, 4 

Arrejats, 11 

Prosecutions, 11 

On probation, 1 

Sentenced to Truant school, 10 

Visits to mills, 28 
Violations of labor law, 

REPORT OF GEORGE K. DAMMON, TRUANT OFFICER. 

Cases of absences investigated from evening schools, 175 

Visits to mills and mercantile establishments in relation to labor 
law, 291 

EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES. 

Not so many certificates were issued as in 1898 by 96. 
This was undoubtedly due to the dull times and the clos- 
ing of the mills. But still the number was large as shown 
below, and required much time to issue. No record is 
kept of those who are refused certificates, of whom there 
are many each year, every case of which requires more or 
less time in explanation. 

I am satisfied that more or less deception is practiced in 
securing certificates, notwithstanding the strictness of the 
law in relation to affidavits regarding age. Although 
))arents are required to make oath regarding the appli- 
cant's age, there is no question that some of them regard 
their necessities as an excuse for false swearing, or through 
dense ignorance know not what they are doing. Due 



60 nrPKRINTKNUENT's REPORT. 

vigilance is used, and when there arises doubt about 
an* applicant his birth ceititicate is required if it can 
l>e procured. But there are many cases where it is im- 
possible to })rocure it, and I must be governed by my 
judgment ah)ne. 

A law was passed by the last Legislature (for full text 
of it see article on attendance), which raises the a*re 
at which a child may leave school to work in cities where 
there is manual training to 15 years of age, instead of 
14 as at present. Another law was passed (for full text 
see article on manual training), which j)rovides that aftev 
the first day of next September cities of twenty thousan 
or more inhabitants shall maintain a manual training d< 
partment in connection with its High school. 

I have continued so far to issue certificates to all chil 
dren desiring them who produce a certificate that the^ ^ 
have attended some proper school thirty weeks after the^'*^ 
were thirteen, and I am inclined to think that I shall con^« 
tinue to do so, the law in regard to manual training notS"^ 
withstanding, for I know^ not how to interpret that lav-^- 
with justice. 



Number of vertlftcates iss 


ued. 








.>4 


For the first time, 








5:n 




Duplicate certiflcat(;s. 
Birthplace of those to y 


1 
A'honi 


certificates 


were issued : 


17 


.V^ 


United States, 








231 




Canada, 








121 




England. 
Western Islands. 








67 

58 




Russia. 








12 




Ireland, 








11 




Germany, 
Scotland, 








10 
4 




Portugal, 

Cape de Verd Islands, 








4 
3 




Prince Edward's Island, 








3 




Austria, 








2 




Sweden, 








1 





8UFERINTEM)Knt's report. 61 



Yance, 


1 




Vales, 


1 




iraxil. 


] 




Denmark, 


1 


5:n 


/^acation certificates issued diititig the suiuiiier vacation. 




112 



rHE WORK IX THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

The work in these schools diirinf^ the year has, as a 
yhole, been characterized by an intelligent conception on 
he part of the teachei*s of the studies they have been 
•ulled upon to teach. There has been marked iuiprove- 
nent in this respect, especially in teaching what may be 
ermed the special branches. 

The methods of teaching have also improved much 
vithin a few years. Part of this improvement is due 
;o the action of the Board some live vears a«:o by which 
)rofessional training has been since then required of those 
^ho desire an appointment to the teaching corps, (lood 
nethods alone will not avail much. They nmst be skill- 
iully used; and this knowledge must be acquired by 
4>ecial training and study. The unskilled artisan cannot 
lo good work with the best of tools ; in fact, the finer the 
ool used the jrreater is the necessity for the skilled hand. 
The failure bv some teachers to secure "^ood results is due 
)fttimes to the want of skill in using a method of 
x?aching rather than to any fault in the method itself. 

In order to secure the l^st results in teaching the teacher 
nust come before his class each day with his lessons 
thoroughly prepared and with a detinite conception of the 
)bject to l)e attained as well as how best to attain it. 
There must be present in him also that spirit that will 
irouse the interest of the pupils and hold their attention, 
or knowledge or method will avail little. And more than 
all, there must be a bond of sympathy and friendliness 
between the teacher and pui)ils which on the one hand will 



62 superintendent's report. 

cause him to exercise a proper forbearance in cases of tail- . ^ ^i 
ure and misconception on the parr of the pupils, and will 
cause the [)upils on the other hand to ])ut forth their be*^ 
efforts to learn, actuated not by fear of displeasure ^^^ 
j)unishment, but by that desire to please one whom th^^ 
love and respect. This desire to please is not somethi^r 
that the teacher will be obliged to eremite, but simply ^^^ 
cultivate, for it is a part of the nature of every norn*^^^ 
child. 

As I have said before, in most of the schools pro| 
preparation is made by the teachers ; good methods j): 
vail ; and in many there is present the tme teaching spii 
But in a system of schools every part is closely related 
the whole. It resembles in a measure the human orjn 
ism : a weakness in one part affects to a greater or 
degree the whole body, and while in the majority of tl 
schools the work is intelligent and accurate, and the 
teaching spirit prevails, there are still some of whi< 
these thin«:s can scarcely^ be said, and these schools tei 
to weaken the whole system. 

In the primary schools there have been no materis- ^ "'^^ . 
changes during the year. Nature work, the study ( ^ ^* 
which was beguu systematically the preceding year, hum^-^ 
been continued, and with a better comprehension of th^^ 
subject on the part of the teachers good progress has beei ^"^'^ 
made. 

Hitherto no text-book in arithmetic has been usec^*^^ 
in these grades. In September Prince's arithmetics wer^''"^ ' 




introduced for use in the upper grades, and the teac^herns^"^ 
have been relieved thereby from much work in preparino^^i-^^ 
examples, while at the same time the work has beerf^^ '' 
strengthened by the new trend given it. 

In the m-annnar schools some marked chancres hav< 
been introduced. Manual training has become a part oi 



the curriculum now for all the grades in one form ou 



$tTPEUIXTENDEXT\s REPORT. 63 

mother. The girls now take sewing the first three years 
)ne hour a week as hitherto : they also take cooking 
I half day once in two weeks during the last two years ; 
^hile the boys take the Sloyd system of manual training 
I half daj' every two weeks for the last three years of the 
!0urse. It would, be well if some arrangement could be 
nade by which the boys could take some form of manual 
raining during the first two years of the granunar course 
vhile the girls take sewing. Although this nuich time is 
levoted to manual training in some form, there has been 
lo change in the amount of work required in the other 
itudies, and there seems to be no more diflioulty in 
iccomplishing it than before. 

Another radical change that has been made in the srram- 
nar schools during the year is the one of experiment in 
he line of departmentjil instruction. Teachers in the 
grammar schools under the old plan were compelled to 
eAch the following subjects : arithmetic, United States his- 
x)ry or geography, or both ; language, including English 
rrammar, reading, writing and spelling, drawing, music, 
Dhysiology, nature work, and gymnastics ; a formidable 
ist. It could hardly be expected that teachers, even 
hough well versed in all these subjects, could have the 
proper interest in teaching them all. They cerUiinly deserve 
ronmiendation for having done so well. To remedy this 
^vil the departmental plan has been inaugurated by which 
hese various branches are divided among several teachers 
o teach. There are different ways of applying this plan. 
[n some places one teacher takes all the reading in the 
juilding, another takes the geography, c^c. But the one 
idopted in our schools is one by which a teacher is not re- 
quired to teach out of her grade. Our granunar schools 
ire particularly adapted to this form. They are concen- 
trated in a few buildings, and, by our organization, each 
luiilding contains but five gi'ades. With but little excep- 



64 SUPIiiRmTKJJDRyT^S rfiport. 

tion there are at least two classes of the same ^rade in 
each hiiilding, and many of these of the same irrado are 
in connectiiig rooms and the pupils can always be kept 
under the eye of some teacher when the teachers are 
chan^nor from room to room. 

In assigning the studies to the various teachers due con- 
sideration was given to the j)references of each, the success 
she had achieved in teaching a branch of study, and the 
amount of work each study would involve under the new 
arrangement. 

The principal objections that have been raised to the 
departmental plan are these : first, that there will be more 
trouble w ith the discipline than under the old plan ; sec- 
ond, that the teachers will not be able to know as well the 
nature and disposition of each pupil w^ho comes under her 
instruction. 

The second objection is an important one from a jieda- 
gogical standpoint ; but in my opinion it does not out- 
weigh the objections to the old plan, especially when 
a teacher is not recjuired to leach in more than two or 
three rooms of the same grade. If the several* teachers 
record the observations made by them upon the various 
pupils and will advise together as well as with the princi- 
pal, I believe that the pu})ils will be better understood by 
them than under the old plan. 

So far in the application of the new plan in our schools 
the (|uesti(>n of discipline has presented no obstacle 
worthy of consideration. Some of the teachers are 
enthusiastic in the approbation of the new plan, others 
disapprove, and some are non-connnittal. This was to l)e 
expected. It is the case with almost any new departure. 
The world is made up of radicals and conser\^atives. It 
is well that such is the case. Whether the departmental 
plan of teaching shall become the fixed plan of instruction 
for granunar schools will depend, however, upon the 



Sri?IlKINTENl)ENT*S REPORT. 6S 

results as evidenced in the {)iipil8 after it has had an im- 
pailial and searching test, and not upon the favor or 
disfavor of individual teachers. 

Another important departure has been begun in the 
grammar grades which I ho])e to see developed and 
systematized in the near future. It is the careful study in 
all grades of one or more masterpieces of English litera- 
ture. In the schedule of studies as now arranged a 
certain amount of time is set apart each week for this 
paq)ose. During the past year I have listened to exer- 
L'ises in some of the lower grammar grades which have 
been a revelation to me of what is [)()ssible for the skilled 
iiid enthusiastic teacher to do in this line with young 
L^hildren. It has been the custom to leave most of this 
kind of work for the High school, and it has been a 
grreat mistake. Manv of the children who need this kind 
r>f work most not onlv never enter the Ilijfh school but 
get little beyond the lowest grammar grades. Who can 
say what the study of some beautiful * poem may do 
towards awakening within such (children the finer instincts 
of their natures, or whnt it may do tow^ards developing 
within them a taste for those things which make life 
purer and nobler. 

In the ungraded schools the work varies somewhat, 
since the organization and composition of those schools 
are quite different. The instruction is on the same 
general plan as that of the graded schools, and the teach- 
ers follow it as well as circumstances will permit. There 
are but three of the twelve schools of this class (and by 
schools I mean different rooms) that are strictly un- 
graded. These are the schools at Rockdale, Plain ville, 
and Clark's Point. It would be far better for the children 
of these schools if they were conveyed each day to the 
graded schools of the citj^ and the separate schools abol- 
ished. This is especially true of the Plainville and 



bG SUPERIXTEXDKXT*S REPOHT. 

Clark's Point schools, where the attendance is both small 
and very irregular. In all of the schools of this class the 
teachers have labored earnestly to secure good results, 
but in two of thorn, the Plainville and Clark's Point, the 
conditions have been very discouraging. At the Rockdale 
school, which has an attendance of from thirty to thirty- 
live pupils of all grades, the experiment ha** been tried, 
with the consent of the parent^, of having the children of 
the lowest grades primary attend during the forenoons 
only. This has relieved the teacher somewhat, and has 
proved to be no loss to the children, as the teacher was 
unable when they did attend afternoons to find the time to 
devote any attention to them that amounted to anything, 
and their restlessness was a continual distraction to her 
while she was engaged in teaching the older pupils. 

THK HIGH SC^HOOL. 

The attendance upon this school was not so large the 
past year as in 1893, and the fact forces iti^elf upon our 
attention that the gfrowth of this school in numbers is not 
conmiensumte with that of the lower schools. This is 
without doubt due in a measure to the fact that a large in- 
crease in attendance in the lower schools within the last 
decade has been in a class of pupils whose parcntj^ do not 
feel that thev can afford to send their children to school 
loniT enouofh for them to finish even their orrammar school 
course. High schools in general, situated in cities whose 
chief industry is textile manufactures, do not rank in jx>int 
of numbers with those whose industries recjuire a more in- 
telligent and therefore better paid class of help. 

But is there no other reason whv" this school is not 
larger? Is there not a feeling in this community as well 
as in others that the High schools are not offering an educa- 
tion which is sufHciently practical, — a feeling that the 
purely acadeuiical course which is still the (me which is 



superintendext's report. (i7 

oiiiphanized in thene Hchools is not the one which l>eBt pre- 
l)ares the averajj^e boy or girl to oope with the world when 
he or she goes out into it ? 

It niav be hard for those of us who have l)een nurtured 

« 

in the belief that one who possesses a fair academic educa-' 
tion is well equipped for the affairs of life, to be com- 
|)elled to recognize that there is a large and growing num- 
lK»r of practical men and women in every community who 
differ with us. They are those who feel that the spe- 
cialization of labor, the adoption of labor-saving machinery 
and devices in ahnost every kind of occupation, and the 
tierce competition that prevails in all the affairs of life de- 
mand that those who attend the higher schools shall have 
the opj>ortunity given them to acquire a training of the 
hand as well as of the mind. Many go farther, and saj^ 
that those oampa(ionj< which are most closely allied to the 
material welfare of a ccmimunity should l>e taught in these 
schools. 

Because these things are so many j)upils are withdrawn 
fnmi the public schools to attend commercial schools, 
which offer them instniction in j)ractical bookkeeping, 
stenography, typewriting, etc. Others are withdrawn and 
jmt to work where they receive little or no remuneration 
for some years l)ecause })arents feel that if their children 
continue their course in school they will be no l>etter 
titted to earn an honest livelihood after finishing a course 
in the High school than l)efore. 

That the demand for what is considered to be a more 
pmctical education is very strong is shown by many of our 
large cities founding manual training High schools and 
carrvin^r them on side ])v side with the academic Hijrh 
schools ; l)y the Legislature enacting a statute requiring 
cities of the State to supply manual instruction in the 
High school ; hy the agitation for trades schools and the 
l>elief advanced that they should become a part of the 



68 superintendent's report. 

public school system. In many other ways indeed thim 
those specified is this feeling manifested. 

I ])egan by referring to the fact that the High school 
was not growing in numl)ers, and have given what a])j)ears 
to me to be one of the chief causes. For I think that the 
advantages offered by our High school are equal to thoiso 
offered by the l)est schools with similar courses of studv. 
I believe that the teaching comj)ares favorably with that of 
the best High schools. It has weaknesses that might well 
l)e remedied, but I doubt if there are many High schools 
whose weaknesses are less marked. Therefore the faihne 
of more to avail themselves of the advantages of the school 
nuist be due to other causes than the administration of the 
present curriculum . 

The new course of study which went into operation in 
Septeml)er, and the outline of which is given in this con- 
nection, is a great improvement on the former one in pro- 
viding: a continuous course for the four vears iu modern 
languages, history and science as well as in English. The 
minor changes also will tend to strengthen the work ; the 
weakness of the course, it seems to me, is the failure to 
provide in it 'any instniction in manual training in any 
form, or any physical training except the military drill. 
At present there is being waged a wordy controvei'sy in 
several States on the question whether military drill should 
form a constituent part of a High school training. With- 
out entering into the controversy, I venture the o[)inion 
that if military drill is to be a pail of our High school 
training arms should be provided for all the boys and drill 
in the manual retjuired, and not relegated only to the vol- 
unteer conn)any of cadets. 

There has been improvement in some of the matters 
which called for criticism last year in the teachinjr. While 
there is an earnest spirit of work in the great majority of 
the puj)ils and a most i)leasant relationship Iwtween them 



SUPERINTENDENT S HEl»ORT. 



B9 



ikI the teachers, thin is not tnie of a stroiifr minority, 
'here ha.s indeed ])een an unusual amount of friction in 
he military drill, and present conditions in drill matters 
annot continue and the whole school not suffer. 

I invite attention to the report of the Princi[)al, Mr. 
Joore, which is appended. 



ABSTRACT OF (X)URSE, 

VITH NITMBEK OF RECITATIONS EACH WEEK IN EACH 

STUDY. 



Genci-al Coar6c. I General Course. 



(Without Latin.) 



(With Latin.) 



College Pifpara- 
tory Course. 

(Without Greek.) 



College Prepnra- 
torj' Course. 

(With Greek.) 



Snglish . . 
*>(»nch . . 
Ugebisi . . 
k'ienee . . 
history . . 
(Greece.) 



Uec. 
. 4 



SUB-JUNIORS. 
Rec. 



• • • 



English 
o Latin . . . 
4 Algebra . . 
21 
2 History . . 

' (Greece.) 



6 
5 
4 

2 



17 



1 



English . . 
Latin . . . 
Algebra . . 
Science . . 
History . . 
(Greece.) 



Rec. 
. 4 

• -li 
. 2! 

. 21 



17 



English . 
Latin . . 
Algebra . 
French . 
History . 
(Greece.) 



Snglish . 
*>enci» 
jeometry 
^iencc • 
history . 
(Rome ) 



JUNIORS. 

Rec. I Rec. 

. 6 'English ... 4 English . 
. .'{|Latin .... 5 j Latin . . 
3 Geometry . . H Geometry 



2 
3 



3 



Science 
History . 
(Rome.) 



17 



History . . 

(Rome.) 
French or Ger- i Frencli or Ger 

man .... 4 man . 



1» 



Rec. 
. 2 
. 5 
. 3 
. 2 
. 31 



4 
19 



History . 
(Home.) 
French . 
Greek . . 



SUB-SKMOHS. 



Rec. 
. 4 
. o 
. 4 
. 5 
. 2 



20 



Rec. 
English ... 2 
Latin .... 5 
Geometry . . 3 



. 3 

. 3 
. 5 

21 



Rec. Rec. i 


Rec. 


Rec. 


[•:nglish . . . 6, English . . . 2 j English ... 2 
French ... 3 Latin ... 4 Latin ... 4 


English ... 2 


Latin .... 4 


/r, German, W^^ i French or Ger- 


French or Ger- 




Juniors . . 4 man .... 4 


man .... 4 


French ... 3 


Matliematics 3 Mathematics 3 


Mathematics 3 


Mathematics 3 


Physics ... 4 Pliysics ... 4 


Physics ... 4 


Physics . . 4 


History ... 2 History ... 2 


History ... 2 


Greek .... 4 


(England.) (England.) 


(England.) 




18 or 19 ' 19 


19 


20 



70 



mupeuintknub.nt's report. 



ABSTRACT OF COURSE— C«w/«rf«/. 



General Course. 


General Course. 


College Prepara 


- 


College Prepara- 


1 


Course. 




tory Course. 


(Without Latin.) ' (With Latin.) 


(Without Greek.) 


(With Greek.) 


SENIORS. 






Rec. 1 Rec. 


Rec. 


Rec. 


English . . . 4 'English ... 2 


English . . . 
r.atin .... 


2 


English ... 2 


French ... 3 TiHtin .... 4 


4 


Latin .... 4 


or^Germnn^tmlh ; French or Ger- 


French or Ger- 






Suff- Seniors 4 


man .... 4 


man .... 


4 


French ... 3 


History of U.S. 


Historyof U. S. 


History of U.S 


• 




& Civ. Govt. 4 


<fe Civ. Govt. 4 


& Civ. Govt. 


4 


History ... 4 


Ttro ofthefol' \ One ofth^./ol- 








lowinij : lowing : 


And either 




And either 


1. Adv. Math. 4 1. Adv. Math. 4 


Adv. Math. . 


4 


Adv. Math. . 4 


2. Chemistry 4 2. Chemistrv 4 


or. Chemistrv 


4 


or^ Chemistry 4 


A. Physiol. & a. Physiol. & 


• 




Greek .... 4 


Hygiene & Hygiene & 








Physiog. . 4 Physiog. . 4 








4. Commercial 4. Commercial 








Arithmetic & i .\rithmetic& 








Bookkeeping 4j Bookkeeping 4 








19 or 20 


18 




18' 


21 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



SIR-JUNIORS. 



Drawing, two recitations. 

Music, one recitation. 

Drill or Gymnastics, one recitation. 

JUNIORS. 

Drawing, one recitation. Three recitations for General Co^*''^ 
without Latin. 
Music, one recitation. 
Drill and Gymnastics, one recitation. 



SUB-SENIORS AND SENIORS. 

Drawing, four recitations, elective for girls in place of Physics <»^" 
Chemistry. 

Music, one recitation. 

Drill or Gymnastics, one recitation. 



^irPKRINTEXDEXT's REPORT. 71 

The High School, 
New Bedford, Mass., I)eceml)er 21, 1HJ)4. 

yfi\ WiUkitn E, Hatch ^ Superintendent of Schools, 

Dear Sir : — At your reciuost I present herewith a l)riel 
report with regard to the High sehool. 

The new course of study, entered upon last September, 
is in sueeessful operation, though its advantages will not 
l)e fully realized until the present suli-junior class shall 
have completed the four years of study under its re(|uire- 
uients. Our school was one of the first to adapt the sug- 
gestions of the "The Committee of Ten" to its needs, and 
the results promise to Ik* satisfactory, especially as the 
large majority of the pupils, who do not expect to go to 
college, are provided with more carefully adjusted and 
more thorou<rh courses of study than heretofore. The 
course is thus devised for the l)est interests of the greater 
iuunl)er who do not go to college*. 

The college [)reparatory course is carefully planned and 

will enable any pupil of average ability and industry to 

center any college or scientific school at the end of four 

Tears of work. This course needs to be well planned, for 

ve have [uipils now pre[)aring for sixteen different higher 

in.stituticms no two of which have exactly the same require- 

'Uent^ for admission. 

There are gratifying indications that before long either 
hone variations in the requirements for admission to col- 
^^e will l)e minimized or else admission will be given to 
lUy gniduate of any one of the best High schools no mat- 
^r which of its courses he may have [mrsued. 

About one hundred and fifty of the pupils now in the 
^*hool expect to go to higher institutions, twenty-five 
VnniT in the senior class, thirty-five in the sul)-senior class 
^lul the rest in the lower classes. 

Stress has been laid upon the development of mental 



72 StJPEniNTENDENT*S REPORT. 

})Ower in the pupils, with instructive and cncoura^ng re- 
sults. Ability to observe accurately, to think inde|KMi- 
dently and to express thought clearly and concisely is ot 
prime value, and in these directions appreciable advance* 
has l)een made. 

The discipline of the school, as a whole, is satisfactory. 
There are, however, a few individuals whose lack of earn- 
estness and failure to respond to the oft-a[)plied stimuli oi 
encouragement, advice and formal reprimand are an injury 
not to themselves alone, Imt also to their well-intentioned 
classmates, who receive less of the teachei's' attention than 
they should l)ecause of the disproportionate time recjuireil 
by these few. I would defend more strenuously the in- 
terests of the ninety-nine out of a hundred pupils who 
show a desire to make the best use of the great privileges 
offered bv the school. 

The school still fails to provide (unfortunately, I think,) 
systematic i)hysical exercise for the "iris, the drill ser\'inir 
that purpose for the boys. As to the drill, it is under 
serious disadvantage in the lack of anns and organization, 
l)ecause it is thereby greatly limited in scope of instruction 
and furnishes no basis for a nuich needed and inspiriting 
ei<prit de corps. 

Respectfully yours. 

(TIAHLES S. MOORK, Principal. 



THE HARRINGTON TRAINING SCHOOL FOR 

TEACHERS. 



This school is a most valuable adjunct to our school 
system, and is doing excellent work in preparing teiichers 
for the schools. 

There have been several changes made in the orsraniza- 
tion and method of conducting the school since its 



ftUPERlXTENDENT*8 REPORT. 73 

inception, and I believe one other is necessary in order to 
to give it the highest effectiveness. 

There are at present eight school rooms in the building, 
all occupied by pupils and representing the first six years 
of school life. Four of these rooms are now taught by 
regularly appointed teachers, instead of by trainers as at 
first, and the remaining rooms are more strictly practice 
rooms. This has been a change in the interest of the 
pupils ; for by giving the principals a less number of 
rooms over which they must exercise the most critical 
watchfulness they can guard more efiiciently the errors in 
teaching of the trainers. 

While this change from the original plan has increased 
the efficiency of the schools so far as the children are con- 
cerned, the other change which I think is necessary is one 
that affects especially the principals and the pupil-teachers. 
At present there are three classes of the pupil-teachers; 
the sub-junior, the junior, and the senior. These classes 
are six months apart, a class being admitted twice a year. 
These classes vary much in numbers ; some number upon 
entrance nine, the maximum, while others contain but two 
or three. This variation in numbers in the different 
classes, and the semi-annual admissions and graduations 
weaken the school in several ways. The course in itself 
is also too short for thorough normal work, and is a source 
of continual mental strain upon the principals. I there- 
fore urge upon the Board to make the training school 
course two years long ; to admit classes and graduate 
them but once a vear. 

If this is done : first, the classes I believe will be more 
uniform in numbers and the work of the school will not 
be disarranged as frequently as it is now ; second, more 
time can be apportioned for normal work to the benefit of 
the teachers and the relief of the principals ; ^hird, the 
substitutes who are taken from the school will be more 



74 superintendent's report. 

efficient ; there will be less repeating of part of the course 
by pupil-teachers, and graduates will have a better con- 
ception of the aim and methods of school work. 

The classes which graduated this year were both un- 
usually small. Those which will graduate next year are 
both large. The usual statistics are appended. 

STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1894. 

Number of pupil-teachers enrolled during the year, 21 

Number of pupil-teachers admitted February, 1894, 7 

Number of pupil-teachers admitted September, 1894, 3 

Number of pupil-teachers in senior class, December, 1894, 8 

Number of pupil^teachers in junior class, December, 1894, 6 
Number of pupil-teachers in sub-junior class, December. 1894, .' 2 

Number of days substituting b}' pupil-teachers, 2374 

Number of days absence for other causes, 151 

Total number of days absence of pupil-teachers, 3S84 

GRADUATES. 

FEBRUARY, 1894. 

Angela Florence Bowie, Marion Hannah Swasey. 

JUNE, 1894. 
Sarah Ellen Slade. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

While the enrolhiient in these schools does not include 
so many different names hy several hundred this year, the 
average nightly attendance has been but thirty-two less 
than the preceding year, and the per cent, of attendance 
has been better. This difference in enrollment and attend- 
ance is partly due to closing the schools several weeks 
earlier than last year, the time when the attendance falls 
off very rapidly. 

As for the last four or five years the greater number of 
the teachers are those who teach in the day schools. 
While I have favored the employment of day school 
teachers in the evening schools, I have done so for one 



superintendent's report. 75 

'eason only — that it would be impossible to conduct 
;hese schools with any efficiency without the employment 
>f the day school teachers. But teachers should not 
mdertake this double duty unless their strength is suffi- 
cient for both. The first duty of the day teachers is 
lue their day schools, and, if they undertake both, 
18 soon as they find the evening school work encroaching 
ipon their other duties they should give it up. 

By far the largest proportion of those who attend the 
?vening schools are illiterates. There are some who are 
lot of this class, and I think there would be more if there 
were offered special courses in bookkeeping, typewriting, 
stenography, etc. It would be an excellent thing also if 
instruction in cooking, sewing, and Sloyd was offered to 
?vening school pupils. 

The discipline and teaching has been good in these 
schools during the year, reports to the contrary notwith- 
ijtanding. In fact, the order in them has been as good as 
myone would care to see. The pupils have been as atten- 
tive and as diligent as could be expected of persons who 
work hard through the day, and who have had little or no 
early mental training. 

A table in another part of this Report gives all details 
of attendance in these schools. 

SPECIAL STUDIES. 

At the beginning of the school year in September a 
new schedule of time for the music supervisor went into 
3{)eration, owing to the arrangement made with him 
by which he now gives four days only each week to 
the city, instead of five as heretofore. This arrangement 
was made as an experiment, in order to retain the sei'vices 
^i the present supervisor without increasing his salary 
very appreciably. The experiment was not recommended 
without some misgivings by the sub-committee, and met 



76 superintendent's report. 

with much opposition in the full Board. I recommended 
the plan to be tried for one year, for I fully aj>pi*eciat^A 
the good work that the supervisor was doing, and I alsCF 
felt that it was not probable that his salary would \y^ 
increased to the figure he demanded for full service. 

But I am convinced that this plan will not answer for 
permanent arrangement for a city of this size and which is^ 
constantly growing. Eight teachers have been added to 
the teaching corps since September, which means an addi- 
tion of three hundred scholars. While I cannot learn 
that the arrangement in the three large grammar schools 
of doubling the classes for singing when the sui)ervi8or 
visits those buildings is at all objectionable, the primary 
schools need more of the direct instruction of the su|>er- 
visor and the country schools should all come under his 
supervision, which they never have done with the exc<?p- 
tion of the Acushnet school. 

The supervisor should also have an unassigned day in 
each month for visiting schools which lose his visits by 
the schools being closed on stormy days or for other 
reasons. Under the present arrangement each grammar 
school is visited by him once in two weeks, and each 
primary school once in a month. If anything happens to 
prevent his visit to a primary class in any one month, 
because the schools are closed on account of stormy 
weather, or for any other reason, two months or more 
may intervene betw^een his visits to the teacher of that 
school. 

While I recommended a trial of the present plan, I did 
so because I felt that it was the only way by which the 
services of the present efficient incumbent could be re- 
tained, as 1 did not believe the lioard would pay the salary 
demanded by him for full service. But for the alwve rea- 
sons, and for some others which are not so ))alpable, I am 
convinced that the schools should have the services of the 



superintendent's report. 77 

music insti*uctx)r for the full five days each week, and hope 
that such an arrangement may be made at the close of the 
|>re8ent school year. 

In drawing also a different arrangement was adopted 

£av the year beginning in September. The teacher of 

drawing in the High school until then had been doing 

cither work there which re(]uired considerable of her time, 

send it was necessary to have very large classes in drawing, 

t^oo hirge in fact for effective work. This plan of having 

the drawing teacher in the High school take also some 

other study was Ixjgun experimentally two years ago to 

^silve expense, but it was not successful for several reasons. 

]?So\v the drawing teacher in the High school gives four 

clays to drawing there, which relieves the pressure of large 

olassea in that branch, and one day a week assists the 

»uj>crvisor of drawing in the lower schools. This plan is 

much more satisfactory. The work in all the schools is 

now thorough and progressive from the lowest grade 

priiuary to the High school. It is applied in illustration 

of several other branches of study, as nature work, 

creogi'aphy, history, composition, science and manual 

training, and not only adds to their effectiveness, but 

is really necessary to their proper teaching. 

The Report last year contained a full report of the work 

from the supervisor and the general course as pursued in 

the schools. The sui)ervi8or and her assistant are both 

e^a.mest, painstaking and efficient, and the work is certain 

to continue to improve under their direction. 

. The same teachers have been emi)l()yed in teaching scw- 
irig as for some years past 'Owing to the continual 
irt crease in the number of pupils, however, all three 
ax-^ now occupied every day each week with the exception 
<>f one day of one teacher. The work moves along 
loothly, and I do not know but as effectively as possible, 
this I am sure that the teachers of this subject are not 
^^ anting in faithful, earnest work. 



78 superintendent's report. 



MANUAL TRAINING. 



ISJ^ 



While drawing, cooking and sewing may fittingly ^^ 
classed under the head of manual training, the term ^^ 
now generally applied to shop work of some kind, eith^^ 
in wood or metal, and thus I will treat it. 

In September last the Manual Training school w^^ 
opened in the Sylvia Ann Rowland schoolhouse in th^^ 
room Iniilt for it. This new form of public schoc ^^ 
instruction is a constituent part of our cuiTiculum. Thr ^ 
departure is radical enough from the school of the {Mu^t « 
but it has evidently' come to stay, and I rejoice th«- ^ 
it is so. 

The school as now organized furnishes instruction ir ^ 
wood-working only to pupils of the three upper gnunnia^^ 
grades. This is but a lieginning, however. This kinc^- 
of work should not stop with the Sloyd work of tht^ 
grammar grades. 

The last Legislature passed the following statute in re- 
lation to this subject, which shows the trend of public 
opinion : — 

ACTS 1894, CHAP. 471. 

An act to provide for manual training in cities of more than ticetU^ 

thottsand inhabitants. 

After the first day of September fn the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five every city of twenty thousand or more inhabitants shall 
maintain as part of its High school system the teaching of manual 
training. The course to be pursued in said instruction shall be subject 
to the approval of the State Board of Education. 

This makes it incumbent upon the Board to provide 
manual training in the High school after next September. 
There is no space in the High school building that i-? 
available for that form of instruction. If manual tmin- 
ing is to l>e extended into the High school I think it 
would be well if the Sylvia Ann Howland schoolhouse 



superintendent's report. 79 

hiLinild be devoted entirely to manual trainin«: work and 
fie cooking school. This of course would necessitate 
uilding another schoolhouse for the primary grades 
rhich are now in that building. If this plan should Ik? 
dopted, something of the same arrangement might be 
aade for the High school l)oys who would take manual 
raining as for those of the grammar grades who now take 
t, or similar to the arrangement made for the High school 
^rls who take cooking lessons. The Board should give 
this whole subject its early consideration. 

Mr. Edwin R. King has charge of the manual training 
work. He was chosen from a number of applicants as 
particularly well qualiiSed for this position. The work 
has l)eoiin well under his instruction. He has made a verv 
fill! report of the work and what it aims to do, and I 
invite careful perusal of it. 



sitperintendent's report. 81 

New Bedford, Deeeinlier 22, 1894. 
To the Superintendent of Schools. 

Sir : — In compliance with your request for a report as 
to the amount of work accomplished, the object of, and 
suggestions for future work in manual training, I submit 
the following : — 

The manual training room at the Sylvia Ann Howhmd 
school building was o|)ened for the use of pupils Septem- 
ber 10, 1894. The system taught is that known as the 
** Swedish Sloyd," which had its origin in Sweden, but has 
lieen Americanized and adapted to the teaching of large 
classes in the elementary schools of this country. 

The word **Sloyd" has no equivalent in the English 
language ; it may be said to mean to design and execute, 
and may be applied not to wood-work alone, but to work 
in metals, straw, or paper. The word is, however, more 
commonly used in this country and in England in connec- 
tion with the branches of wood-work which are l)eing 
taught in the various schools. The word as now used 
i-eally signifies educational manual training. 

There are at present ten thousand children receiving 
instruction in Sloyd in the schools of the United States. 

The course of work as laid out for pupils in the gmm- 
mar grades includes the making of fifteen different joints 
and involves the use of forty-seven different tools, and 
also represents seventy-two different exercises. 

Sloyd aims at the **hannonious development of the 
pupil, giving him by manual training and the use of the 
creative instinct such f/eneral trainhitj as will tend to fit 
him morally, mentally, and physically for any subsequent 
special trainin//.^^ Sloyd exercises are strictly progi'essive, 
treating the eye and hand as avenues to the brain. 

All models made in the Sloyd room are such as may be 
used at home or by the boy in his play. It should not l)e 



82 superixtendent's report. 

inferred, however, that because the advocates of Sloyd claim 
the useful model that they place it upon the side of 
the industrial and economic, rather than that of intellect- 
ual training ; or because boys are being taught to work in 
wood that they are to become carpenters, cabinet makers, 
or pattern makers. Such is not the case ; and when metal 
work shall have been introduced into the manual training 
course the true object of these exercises in higher and 
broader education will be kept strictly in view. 

Manual training does, however, form a foundation upon 
which to build up a technical education, or to fit a boy for 
special trade work. In the manual training school the 
object is not the narrow one of teaching a trade, nor is 
dexterity in special operations or the use of certain tools 
the end in view. But the insight which the boy obtains 
and the acquisition of the *' fundamental principles which 
underly all trades " may in the future prevent the mistakes 
made by so many boys who select and attempt to follow 
avocations for which they have no aptitude, thus depriv- 
ing not only themselves, but perhaps a large number of 
peo{)le, the benefit of talents which had they been prop- 
erly directed would have been of great advantage to the 
community at large. 

The working drawing used in manual training forms a 
prominent feature. It is not, however, desired to narrow 
the instruction in this course to drawing alone, ])ut the 
making of the drawing, its use and the ability of the 
pupil to read it, and to understand the relation between 
the object which he wishes to make and the drawing which 
he may have already made are strong points in favor of 
manual training. To the professional man as well as to 
the mechanic will this training be a benefit. 

After the first dmwings have been completed the boy is 
given the knife with which to l)egin his tool work, it ]>eing 
the most simi)le as well as the least mechanical of all 



superintendent's report. 83 

tools. The free hand knife work in the Sloyd course is 
especially commendal)le, obliging the boy from the begin- 
ning to concentrate his whole mind upon the work which 
he has in hand. The knife is the only tool with which 
alone he can complete a model. 

Form study, the cultivation of the jesthetic sense, the 
forming of the habits of perseverance, order, accuracy in 
measurements and in workmanshij), neatness of person, 
thorough honesty in the execution of his work, and in- 
stilling a respect for honest bodily labor — these are a few 
of the many princij)les which the Sloyd teacher strives to 
inculcate by appealing to thenatuml interest and activities 
of the pupil. Sloyd also aims at the development of both 
the right and left sides of the body, and pays special 
attention to positions taken during work. 

In short, Sloyd proposes, in connection with his other 
studies, to so educate the pupil that he may enter any walk 
in life with greater ease because of the gi-eater brain 
power acquired. To act one must think, and, if the 
action is sufficiently varied, equally varied will be the 
thought. 

The pupils who have entered the manual training 
school the present year are those who are members of the 
seventh, eighth and ninth grades at the Fifth Street, 
^liddle Street, Parker Street, Rockdale and the Acushnet 
Village schools, and the seventh grade from Thompson 
Street and Cedar Grove Street schools. There was a 
total enrollment in the school December 22, 1894, of .422 
pupils. At that time a number of the classes had com- 
menced model number five.* No pupils have as yet been 
admitted from the High school, but it is hoped that the 
uiemliers of the ninth grade classes who enter that school 
the coming year will be allowed to continue their manual 
work. 



* See list of Sloyd models. 



84 superintendent's report. 

In your last Iteport you expressed a wish that the 
manual work should begin as soon as possible after the 
pupil had entered the grammar school. There is a move- 
ment on foot in Boston to place the fourth grade boys 
(corresponding to the sixth grade in this city) in some 
manual training to be taught in the regular class room, 
giving the pupils a few of the more simple tools to use. 
The work is to be done in two dimensions only. A 
special knife-work course is being prei)ared with this end 
in view. It comprises eighteen models, but is as yet 
in the experimental stage. 

After the work in the sixth grade, the seventh grade 
boys should begin the j)reliminary Sloyd, which requires 
the completion of fifteen models. The present seventh 
grade would have been started at this point, but it would 
have required some extra expense for tools, which I did 
not at that time wish to recommend. They are at i)rescnt 
doing well in the regular three years' course which follows 
the preliminary Sloyd. 

The training which the pupil would receive in the pre- 
liminary Sloyd course would enable him to proceed with 
greater intelligence and rapidity in the advanced work 
upon which the beginners of the j)resent year are at work. 

Before we can conform to the law with regard to the 
High school course for boys who have completed the gram- 
mar school work, it will be necessarv for them to l)econie 
thoroughly acquainted with the following exercises : — 

1 . The makin<r and use of both scale and detail drawings. 

2. The proper manner of tiling the gauge spur ; the 
sharpening ol planes, chisels and gouges; the use of tirst, 
the oil stone, afterwards the grind-stone ; the pro|H»r 
angle and shape of the teeth of saws, and the different 
kind of saws. 

3. Methods of planing, boring, scoring, mortising, 
and manners of finishing. 



superintendent's report. 85 

4. WayH of faatening, such as pailing, screwing, 
gluing, draw lM)ring, and the use of pins, wedging and 
dovetailing. 

5. A familiarity with the various joints in use in 
mechanical work. 

At this point the hoy is in readiness to continue his 
wood- work upon a higher plane. He may take up wood 
turning and some steps in cabinet work. He may learn 
the manner of using veneers, because veneered work will 
stand l)etter than the solid w^ood, and lx?cause work must 
l)e veneered on both sides. 

The use of tree sections might l)e introduced in order 
to allow the pupils to examine the structure of the differ- 
ent kinds of wood, the manner of growth, the [)resence 
unci appearance of sap wood, and strength of different 
kinds of lumber, where the more common kinds are 
found, and the market prices of those that are most used 
in construction and for ornamental i)urposes. 

Turning, in connection with pattern making, might In? 
taujjht in the second year's work, and moulding and cast- 
ing Avith some soft metal or with plaster in the third year 
of the High school. This would finish the boy's seventh 
year in manual training. After that light iron work 
niight l)e introduced ; this, however, seems to be a work 
for the distant future. 

It has been observed that teachers of natural science are 
frenerally strong advocates of manual tmining ; they know 
how essential a knowledge of drafting and an al)ility to 
handle tools is to one who designs, constructs, or even 
keej>s in order a piece of physical apparatus. 



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superintendent's report. 93 

THE HEALTH OF PUPILS. 

It i« a matter of siipreuie inipoi-tanc^ whether the 
physical welfare of the pupils is properly cared for while 
they attend school. It is a great wrong to compel chil- 
dren to attend a school, the rooms of which are not well 
ventilated and lighted, or whose other sanitary conditions 
are not good. Public sentiment has l>een aroused in 
regard to these special matters within a few years, and 
there has been a decided improvement in the sanitary 
condition of modem schoolhouses. There has been a 
great improvement for the letter also within twenty- 
five years in the scat^s and desks used. But too many 
children are compelled to sit for hours each day in seats 
which for one cause or another are entirely unsuitable 
from a hygienic standpoint. Adjustable desks have been 
invented which can l)e fitted to any child, and they should 
1)6 in every school room. 

Another danger to which |)upils ap|)ear to be more sul)- 
jected to in school than out is that of contacting con- 
tagious diseases. Precautions are now used by excluding 
every pupil from school who has l)een exposed to such 
diseases until he presents a certificate from a physician 
that all danger of contagion is past. But statistics show 
that notwithstanding this precaution contagious diseases 
are much more prevalent when the schools are in session 
than at other times. This exclusion of children who are 
kno^Ti to have l>een exposed in any way to contagion re- 
sults in a serious loss of time to many children other than 
those w^ho are sick. More needs to l)e done to prevent 
contagion in the schools. The sources of contagion in 
the school room should be reduced to as small a number as 
possible. It is thought that slates, si)onge8 and pencils 
which are used by different pui)ils are prime sources in 
spreading contagious diseases in the schools. On this 



94 superintendent's report. 

account some cities have already abolished the use of 
slates and sponges in their schools, and require the lead 
pencils that are used, in drawing and writing to be dis- 
tributed to each pupil for his exclusive use. The expense 
of paper is some more, (if used for all purposes instead 
of slates, ) but this should not be considered if the health 
of the pupils is at stake. I ask the attention of the Board 
to this matter and reconmiend the substitution of imi)er 
for slates in all of the schools. 

A thorough and systematic system of physical training 
should be in use in the schools if the health and well lieing 
of the pupils are to be promoted as they should be. 
Opinions may differ as to the iiest system lo use, but I do 
not think that many will argue against the l)enefits to be 
derived by the children from such a course. Physical 
culture in the school room is not offered, however, as 
a substitutt* for the spontaneous play and out-door games 
of the children. These ought to be encouraged more than 
they are, and it would be an ideal system if every school- 
house could have extensive play grounds and i)lay sheds 
where the children, under the sujKJiTision and direction of 
their teachers, could indulge in all sorts of health-giving 
plays and other exercises. 

But such c(mditions are i)ractically impossible in our 
])ublic schools, owing to the great expense that this would 
entiiil. The next i)est thing is to supplement present con- 
ditions with a system of physical training tau<rht in the 
school rooms ; a system that will reijuii'e little or no 
ai)i)aratus, in the lower grades at least, but which will 
develoj) health, strength and a proper carriage of j>erson 
in the puj)ils. There are such systems. There are not 
many i)r()gressive cities where a system of [)hysical train- 
ing is not a constituent part of the curriculum. Excellent 
teachers, professionally trained, are now to l)e had at no 
great cost. 



StlPfiRlN'rEXDENT*S REPORt. 95 

Some two years ago the Board, upon the recommenda- 
tion of a special committee appointed for the puqwse of 
investigating systems of physical training and reporting 
upon one to use in the schools, voted to adopt the Ling 
system. No special instructor has l)een elected, however, 
without whom it would not be exi)edient to put the system 
into practice. Another committee was appointed recently 
to consider this question, hut no rejwrt was made l)efore 
the close of the year, when its time of service came to an 
end by limitation. I most earnestly hope that the Board 
will take speedy action on this matter. 

TEACHERS. 

The legislature of 1H8(> passed the following act relat- 
ing to the tenure of office of teachers: *'The school 
committee of an}^ city or town may elect any duly quali- 
fied person to serve as a teacher in the public schools of 
such city or town during the pleasure of such committee ; 
provided such jKjrson has ser\'ecl as teacher in the public 
schools of such city or town for a i)eriod of not less than 
one year." 

The school authorities of the various cities and towTis 
have been rather slow to adopt the permissions of this 
statute. They have felt that the tenure of office of effi- 
eient and faithful teachers is sufficiently stable with annual 
elections ; that indeed with annual elections it is not 
an easy matter to hold some teachers up to their best effort 
or to disjiense with their services even when known to l)e 
inefficient, owing to the influence of their friends, politi- 
c'al or otherwise, and that permanent tenure would make 
«uch teaching still more indifferent and inefficient ; that 
public sentiment has not yet demanded that i)rofessional 
preparation of teac^hers which would make it expedient to 
give any more stable tenure of office to them. 



d() dUPfiRlOTfiKDENT*8 REPORT. 

Whether sound or not, these arguments have been suffi- 
ciently strong to prevent the act of 1886 becoming gener- 
ally adopted. Some cities have adopted its provisions, 
however, and I believe the day is not distant when all of 
them will. 

Some six years ago the adoption of this act was urged 
upon your Board by a member, but no action was taken. 
I was not then sufficiently acquainted with the schools of 
the city to know whether it was best at that time to adopt 
it or not ; but from the knowledge I possessed of the man- 
ner in which additions had been made to the teaching 
corps for some years preceding, and for other similar rea- 
sons, I then fplt that it would be better to postpone action 
upon it. 

But I l)elieve the time has come when this act should be 
adopted for our schools, and all teachers of the coi*ps who 
have taught acceptably in them for at least three years 
should iKi elected during the pleasure of the School Com- 
mittee ; and hereafter all teachers after three years of ac- 
ceptable service should be placed upon the permanent list. 

J recommend this change for these reasons : — 

1 . The teaching coqw is now^ in excellent condition as 
a Avhole, and the regulations of the Board now require 
adequate preparation for admission to it. 

2. Annual elections are a source of w'orry, or at least 
of annoyance, which is distracting to the teachers in their 
work and which affects often worthy and efficient teachers 
full as imich as those who are least efficient, and the 
tendencv of annual elections is to weaken the influence of 
the teacjiers in their school rooms rather than to strengthen 
it. 

3. The School Committee ])V adopting this act surren- 
der no i)art of their power of removal, but simply forego 
the annual election of all teachers upon the permanent 
list. 



superintendent's report. 97 

The Board has dispensed with the services of but five 
or six teachers during the last seven years, and these in 
every case for failure in governing or teaching and after 
consideration in each case by tlie proper sub-committee. 
Yet during this time every teacher of the corps has been 
comi>elIed to go through the annual ordeal of being re- 
elected. It may l)e said in argument that worth}' and 
eflScient teachers need have no fear of an annual election. 
But the fact is they do and always will have, and so does 
every one who holds a public or quasi-public office. If 
elected during the pleasure of the School Committee, 
which means virtually election until they are shown to be 
inefficient or unworthy, teachers would have a feeling of 
security in their positions which would reduce their 
inclination to worry, help to give them that balance and 
poise of mind which is so necessary to those who are 
called upon to govern, and strengthen their influence with 
their pupils. But with pennanent tenure of office for 
teachers there is the greater necessity for exercising the 
utmost care in appointing and in confirming them. 

The services of two teachers were dispened with during 
the year, and there have l)een a num])er of resignations 
for various reasons. The vacancies thus caused and the 
increase in attendance of pupils have necessitated an un- 
usual numl)er of appointments. 

There has l>een an unusual num])erof absences of teach- 
ers on ac<5ount of their own ill health and sickness in their 
:families. Those absences (together with a few incidental 
ones) amounted to 1,322 half days last year, requiring the 
i^ervices of about four substitutes for each school day. The 
time is surely coming when candidates for teachers' posi- 
tions will l)e required to undergo a physical examination 
l)efore they will be peniiitted to enter the teaching profes- 
ssion. Many who enter it now are physically unfit to 
undertake its duties. It is the dutv of tejichers to take 



98 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



more exercise than most of them do, and it should l)e ot^^' 
door exerciae so far as possible. Many of them are sat3^ v 
wanting in that physical vigor that is so necessary t: ^^"^ 
them to resist the nervous strain made upon them in th 
profession. 

All the appointments, resignations, transfei*s, et<?., t> *^^ 

given below : — 



\t 



APPOINTMENTS. 



Edmand E. Baudoin, 
Emma B. McCulloiigh, 
Mary W. I^yiiiunion, 
Annie 0. Hart, 
Emma A. GUman, 
Lucy F. Winchester, 
N. Emma Slacli, 
Agnes W. Lindsey, 
Angenette Chace, 
Julia F. Coombs, 
Angela F. Bowie, 
Carrie Ij. Chapman, 
Ruth M. Tripp, 
Nellie A. Walker, 
Sarah E. Shide, 
Elizabeth S. Foster, 
Florence A. Chaffln, 
A. Gertrude Wheaton, 
Edwin R. King, 



Military Instructor, High school. 
Fifth Street Grammar school. 
Fifth Street Grammar school. 
Fifth Street Grammar school. 
Middle Street Grammar school. 
Middle Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Thompson Street Grammar school. 
Linden Street Primary school. 
Linden Street Primary school. 
Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
Dartmouth Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary schooU ^ 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school* ^ 
Manual Training Teacher. 



il. 



J. 
1. 



I 
:*>1 



RESIGNATIONS. 



John K. McAfee, 
Harriet F. Hart, 
Blanche W. Sheldon, 
Nancy H. Brooks, 
Clara B. Watson, 
Agnes W. Lindsey, 
Isadora Foster, 
Annie M. King, 
Ethel VV. Denham, 
Carrie A. Shaw, 



Military Instructor, High school. 
Fifth Street Grammar school. 
Fifth Street Grammar school. 
Fifth Street Grammar school. 
Middle Street Grammar school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Linden Street Primary school. 
Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
Cannonville Primary scnool. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 



superintendent's report. 5)9 

ABSENT ON LEAVE. 

iinma Slack, Parker Street Grammar school. 

L. Pettey, Parker Street Grammar school. 

(r S. I^ach, Linden Street Primary schooL 

jr C. Barstow, Dartmouth Street Primary school. 

M. Hatch, Cedar Grove Street Primary schooL 

ibeth Bennett, Acushnet Avenue Primary. 

TRANSFERS. 

ie M. Allen, from L W. Benjamin to Fifth Street, 

n McCoy, from Cedar Grove Street to Middle St. 

let N. Hyatt, from Acushnet Avenue to Acushnet. 

line O. Peirce, from Acushnet to Acushnet Avenue, 

h A. Winslow, from L W. Benjamin to Acushnet Ave. 

I W. Corish, from Training school to Cedar Grove St. 

ence A. Poole, from Training school to Cannonville. 

on H. Swasey, from Training school to I. W. Benjamin. 

TEMPORARY ASSISTANTS. 

e Jj. Burbank, Linden Street school. 

r G. Fuller, North school. 

TEACHERS' MEETINGS. 

1 niv rounds of visits to the schools I note the state of 
I room in regard to temperature, ventilation, eleanli- 

and order, as well as the metliods of discipline and 
ruction that are em))Ioyed l)v the various teachers. I 

ol)sei've whether the regulations of the Board and the 
se of study are l>eing followed and the progress that 
ade by the pupils. 

tiese observations, whether favorable or unfavomble, 
made the basis of the meetings that I hold with the 
cipals of the schools each month. They in turn hold 
tings of their assistants each month, or oftener, and 
18S these matters with them. Si)ecial matters relating 
IV individual teacher are brouji^ht to his or her atten- 

alone, either by me directly or through the medium 
le principal. 



100 superintendent's report. 

In addition to princii)als' meetings, meetings of differ- 
ent kinds are held for the instruction of the teachers in 
methods of teaching, both in their general and special 
work. The drawing and music supervisors l>oth hold 
meetings throughout the year for instruction in their 
special subjects. Prof. A. C. Boyden, of the Bridgewater 
Normal School, has met the teachers of all grades one 
Saturday in each month for instruction in nature work as 
during the previous year. This work under his general 
guidance is becoming a source of valuable ti'aining for the 
pupils. 

On October 19 a teachers' institute was held in this city 
under the direction of the State Board of Education. 
The schools were dismissed for that day and all the teach- 
ers attended the exercises, which were most stimulating 
and helpful. The teachers from the adjacent towns and 
Fall River also attended in such numbers that there were 
nearly five hundred teachers who enjoyed the l>enefit of 
the exercises. 

The following was the progmm : — 

PROGRAM. 

0.00 A. M. Introductory Remarks, . . Frank A. Hill, 

Secretary of the Board. 
9.20 A. M. Principles and Methods of 

Teaching, . . . . t . John T. Prince, 

Agent of the Board. 

10.00 A. M. Drawing (Primary Section), Henry T. Bailey, 

Agent of the Board. 
10.00 A. M. Reading and literature 

(Grammar Section), . . Miss Anna B. Thoiopson, 

Thayer Academy ^ Braintree. 
10.00 A.M. Physics (High School Sec- 
tion), Charles F. Warner, 

English High School, Cambridge. 
11.00 A. M. Geography (Primary Section), Frank F. Murdoek, 

BridgeuxUer Normal School. 
11.00 A. M. History (Granmiar Section), George H. Martin. 

Supermtor Boston School*. 



superintendent's report. 101 

11.00 a.m. Algebra (High School Sec- 
tion), J. W. McDonald, 

Agent of the Board. 
130 P. M. Arithmetic (Primary Section), George I. Aldrlch, 

Stipt. qf School*, yewton, 
1.30 r. M. Geography (Grammar Sec- 
tion), Mr. Murdock. 

1.30 p.m. HistoryCHigh School Section), Mr. Martin. 
2.30 P. M. Heading (Primary Section), . A. W. Edson, 

Agent of the Board. 
2.30 P. M. Drawing (Grammar Section), Mr. Bailey. 
2.30 p. M. Latin (Eligh School Section), .Mr. McDonald. 
3.30 p. M. Language (Primary Section), Mr. Prince. 
3..30 p. M. Arithmetic (Grammar Sec- 
tion), Mr. Aldrich. 

3.30 P. M. English Literature (High 

School Section), . . . Miss Thompson. 

Oil Thursday evening, October IK, Rev. Dr. Alexander 
MeKenzie, of Cambridge, delivered a lecture in connec- 
tion with the institute in High School Hall on *'The 
Imagination in Education." 



VERTICAL PENMANSHIP. 

One of the most recent of the educational movements 
is the one to revoluticmize the style of i>enmanshi]) which 
has so long held sway, namely, the Italian or sloping 
stvie. This stvle of writing is said to have been invented 
l)y a Venetian in the sixteenth century, and to have spread 
rjij)idly throughout Europe. The vertical form of pen- 
xiiansbip which is now advocated as l)etter than the sloping 
is said to have l)een the form in use among the ancient 
Oreeks and Romans, and prevailed throughout Europe 
through the Middle Ages. It was the style of penmanship 
practiced hy our forefathers, and many of the early docu- 
ments of this country were written in that style, and are 
remarkably clear and legible after the lapse of several 
centuries. 



102 superintendent's report. 

So this movement for vertical penmanship is u renais- 
sance in writing, not a new invention. It is claimed for 
it: — 

1. That it is more legi])le than the sloping style. 

2. That it is more easily acquired by the pupils. 

3. That its use is less liable to produce spinal curva- 
ture, myopia, and other ills that the use of the slojnng 
style tends to produce in the pupils. 

4. That it occupies less si)ace than the sloping form 
and can l>e more quickly written. 

These certainly are strong arguments in its favor, if 
they are sound. The first claim seems to me to lie self- 
evident. The second is based on the statement of unbiased 
teachers w^ho have tried both. A trial of three months in 
one of our schools gave strong proof that the pupils 
acquired the style much more readily than they did the 
slanting even in the higher grades, and their writing w^as 
more legible than before. 

High medical authority in Germany, Austria and Eng- 
land, and other forei«:n countries where investiijations 
have )>een made in styles of penmanship and their relation 
to the physical welfare of the pupils, strongly endorse the 
veil ical . 

It surely occuj)ies less sjmcc, and the fact that classes of 
persons who are comi)elled from the nature of their occu/w- 
tion to write rapidly, such as telegrai)hers and reporters, 
use the vertical form to a gvcat extent, gives force to the 
dainj that it can be more (juickly written. 

The j)rincipals of the grammar schools of the city arc 
unanimous in favor of its adoj)tion. For these reasons? 
and because of the failure of the great majority of the 
l)upils lo accjuire the art of writing a legil)le and rapid 
hand under the old style, I reconunend the adoption ot 
the vei*tical for use in the schools of the city. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 103 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY AND THE SCHOOLS. 

There in now Bcareely a city or town of any importance 
in the State that cannot boast of its public library, which 
has either been presented to it and endowed by some 
philanthropic citizen or created and maintained by the 
town itself. Massachusetts is as famous to-day for the 
number and quality of her public libraries as she is for the 
character of her public schools. They were both founded 
for the same purjioses, — the suppression of ignorance and 
the creation of an intelligent body of citizens. For this 
reason and because they are suppoi-ted by public funds, 
they both should not only be open to those who wish to 
patronize them, but should strive to bring those who 
know not their advantages nor care for them within their 
beneficent influences. 

It is not my intention, however, to engage in a disser- 
tation upon the public library and what it should do in a 
community, for it is not fitting in a report of this kind. 
But I do feel that these two great factors in public educa- 
tion, the public school and the [)ublic library, should 
be brought into more intimate relationship than they have 
ever been. Whether it has been the fault of the schools 
in not seeking with sufficient earnestness the advantages 
offered by the libraries, or whether the libraries have not 
offered the inducements that they should to the schools, is 
not the question. The question is, is there that close 
inter-relation between the public schools and the public 
libraries that there should be ; and if not, how can it best 
l>e brought about ? 

In some of the large cities of the West much is being 
done in the way of cooperation between the library and 
the school. In some places teachers are invited to come 
in groups to the library to be informed by the librarian 
about the treasures to be found there, and conferences are 



104 superintendext's report. 

held regarding the best way of making the library a help- 
ful supplement to the school work ; in some, sets of books 
of fifty or more, selected for their merit and suitability to 
young readers, have been purchased and organized into 
a kind of circulating library for the schools ; in some, lists 
of books suitable for children of different ages are i>re- 
pared at the library with titles and catalogue numbers and 
sent to the various schools, thus stimulating the chil- 
dren to read good literature and to aid them in selectinir 
it ; in some, where the building is suitable and the funds 
of the library^ permit the employment of sufficient assist- 
ance the children themselves are even given ac<^^ess to the 
bookshelves to choose from the rich store spread Iwfore 
them. In very many the teachers are given privileges in 
regard to the numl)er of l)ooks they are permitted to take 
fnmi the library to their schools, as w^ell as to the lenjrth 
of time they are pennitted to keep them. 

I think that in the cities of the West there has l)een 
greater progress in establishing the proper relation between 
the librarv and the schools than in the East ; but within a 
few years nuich has l)een done in this direction in many 
places in the East and especially in our own State. This 
movement should become general. And as there is scarcely 
a hamlet of any size in the State that does not have its pul>- 
lic library, what a powerful instiiiment for good such a 
movement would become. 

Childhood and youth are the periods in which habits are 
formed for life. Therefore if a taste for "food literature 
with all its wholesome influences is to be inculcated in the 
next ircneration it must be done in their youth and chiefly 
while they are in school. 

1 d(\sirc to see a more intimate relation between our 
public library and our schools. 

I h()j)e in the future that every inducement to use the 
l)ublie library will be put forth to the teachers and pujnls 



superintendent's report. 105 

that in possible, and that every privilege will l>e accorded 
them in uning it that is consistent with present conditions. 
I also most sincerely hope that the time is not far distant 
when we shall have a new library building so arranged that 
many of the limitations now necessary may be removed. 

It gives me pleasure to state that within a year the 
teachers of the city on their petition have l)een granted 
certain privileges in the use of the librarj^ which have 
l)een hitherto withheld. I am pleased also to l)e able to 
present at the end of this Report a list of books suitable 
for young j)eople, most of which are to be found in the 
librar^'. This list has been compiled from various sources 
by Mr. George H. Tripp, principal of the Middle Street 
Gnimmar school, to whom I am happy to make this 
ac^knowledgment for his painstaking work. 

A good beginning has l)een made toward making the 
public library an active agent in the school work of the 
city. It is a movement whose future possibilities will de- 
I)end both upon the recognition of its value by the teachers 
of the city, and the hearty co-operation of the librarj' 
authorities. 

CONCLUSION. 

In concluding, I desire to express to the teachers my 
sincere appreciation of the co-operation given by them 
in all matters relating to the regular work of the schools, 
and for their willingness to undertake new lines of work 
proposed. To the Committee also my thanks are hereby 
rendered for its continued confidence and sui)poit, and to 
the indi^ndual meml)ei*s for their assistance alwavs williiiirlv 
jK'corded me in administering mv office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HATCH, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



LIST OF TEACHERS, 



Grade. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 
Summer street, between Mill and North streets. 

Charles S. Moore, principal, 25 Seventh straet, 

Chas. T. Bouney,'Jr., sub-master, 121 Washington street, 

Charles R. Allen, science teacher, 84 Spring street, 

Sarah D. Ottiwell, assistant, 184 Kempton street. 



Elizabeth P. Briggs, 
Lydia J. Cranston, 
Lucretia N. Smith, 
Mabel W. Cleveland, 
Mary E. Austin, 
Helen L. Hadley, 
Emma K. Shaw, 



366 Union street, 
129 Elm street, 
72 Foster street, 
81 North street, 
512 Kempton street, 
196 Grinnell street, 
72 High street. 



Edmand E. Baudoin, military instructor, 

303 County street, 



•2750 
1600 

160O 
900 
90O 
90O 
90O 
850 
90O 
850 
90C^ 

30(^ 



Fifth Street : 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



Fifth street, corner of Russell street. 



9 
9 

8 
8 
7 
7 
6 
6 

O 
O 



Allen F. Wood, principal, 

Lydia A. Macreading, assistant, 

Emma B. McCullough, 

Mary E. Allen, 

Sarah E. Stoddard, 

Emma A. McAfee, 

Mary W. Ley m union, 

Annie C. Hart, 

Mary A. Kane. 

Grace L. Carver, 

Lottie M. Allen, 



4( 



ii 



111 Acushnet avenue, 
17 Bonney street, 
300 Purchase street, 
25 Madison street, 
352 County street, 
63 Fifth street, 
55 Hill street, 
54 Fourth street, 
127 Grinnell street, 
147 Acushnet avenue, 
118 Fifth street. 



Middle Street : 

Summer street, between Elm and Middle streets. 

George H. Tripp, i)rincipal, Fairhaven, 

1) Helen Ring, assistant, 271 Union street, 

9 Lucy F. Winchester, " Fairhaven, 



1900 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
550 
600 
600 
475 



1900 
600 
600 



superintendent's report. 



107 



de. 



Katharine Commerford, assistant, Ashland street, 



Etta M. Abbott, 
Lucy B. Fish, 
Julia C. Gifford, 
Helen McCoy, 
Emma A. Gilman, 
Agnes J. Dunlap, 
Clara S. Vincent, 

iKER Street: 



(fc 



i( 



kt 



14 



> k 



fcfc 



(( 



233 Middle street, 
215 Maxfield street, 
9 Arch street, 
68 Walden street, 
175 William street, 
117 Hillman street, 
233 Middle street, 



Parker street, near County street. 

Francis J. Heavens, principal, 
Anna L. Jennings, assistant, 



kk 



Julia F. Coombs, 
Emma D. Larrabee, 
Susan H. Lane, 
Martha A. Heraenway, 
Regina M. Paul, 
.nd 6 Angenette Chace, 

Elizabeth B. Brightman, " 
May L. Pettey, 
Mariana N. Bichmoiid, 
Emily A. Delano, 
Mary E. Sturtevant, 



ii 



u 



n 



ki, 



ki 






64 Willis street, 
215 Maxfield street, 
113 Hillman street, 
14 Parker street, 
94 Hillman street, 
5 Lincoln street, 
29 Parker street, 
35 Dartmouth street, 
14 Parker street, 
22 Pope street, 
34 High street, 
East Freetown, 
220 Summer street, 



>MPSON Street Grammar and Primary: 

Thompson street, corner of Crapo. 

Katharine N. Lapliam, principal, 236 Union street, 
Cora B. (Jleveland, assistant, 81 North street, 
Elizabeth M. Briggs, 



n 



Mary A. Macy, 
Daisy M. Butts, 
Angela F. Bowie, 
Leonora B. Hamblin, 
Annie L. Browuell, 



ki 



ki 



i( 



kC 



351 County 8ti*eet, 
72 Bedford street, 
116 Willis street, 
111 Dartmouth street. 
South Orchard street, 
15 Sherman street. 



•AR Grove Street Primary and Grammar: 

Cedar Grove street, near Acashnet avenue. 



Maria B. Clark, principal. 
Flora E. Estes, assistant, 

Kate Sweet, 
Isabella F. Winslow, 
Julia W. Corish, 



kk 



ik 



kk 



131 Chestnut street, 
535 Purchase street, 
287 Kempton street, 
506 Purchase street, 
86 Mill street, 



$600 
600 
600 
500 
550 
600 
600 
600 



1900 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
550 
550 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 



1200 
550 
475 
600 
550 
400 
560 
550 



800 
560 
550 
560 
425 



108 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



Grade. 
3 



Florence A. Chaffln, assistant, 



Annie G. Brawley, 
Edith K. Weeden, 
Elizabeth S. Foster, 
Mary J. Eldridge, 
Caroline E. Bonney, 
Ruth £. Pease, 
A. Gertrude Wheaton, 
Laura C. McCabe, 
and 6 Lizzie E. Oniey, 
Alice A. Richardson, 



(( 



(4 



(4 



h< 



44 



44 



4^ 



44 



44 



44 



35 Eighth street, •oOO 

68 Walden street, 550 

614 Ck)unty street, 550 

175 William street, 550 
314 South Second street, 550 

52 Bonney street, 425 

658 County street, 450 

345 Cottage street, 450 

153 Grinnell street, 400 

63 lliomas street, 600 

65 William street, 475 



Harrington Training School : 

Court street, corner of Tremont street. 



Josephine B. Stuart, principal, 
Anna W. Braley, vice-principal. 
Belle Almy, assistant, 

Fannie M. Spooner, 
Kate Moore, 
Grace W. Russell, 



44 



44 



464 County street, 
619 County street, 
201 Cottage street, 
70 Morgan street, 
101 Park street, 
152 Purchase street, 



1500 
1000 
500 
450 
450 
425 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



AcusHNET Avenue: 



Acushnet avenue, near Grinnell street. 



44 



44 



44 



Jane C. Thompson, principal, 
Nellie A. Walker, assistant, 
Uattie L. Finlan, 
Elizabeth Bennett, 
Caroline O. Pierce, 
and 2 Caroline S. Silva, 
Sarah A. Winslow, 
Julia M. Pilling, 
Margaret H. Holmes, 
Harriet L. Cornell, 



44 



4. 



44 



100 Washington street, 
25 Madison street, 
186 County street, 
46 State street, 
1 Spruce street, 
81 Washington street, 
315 County street, 
24 Seventh street, 
661 County street, 
151 Middle street. 



1. W. Benjamin School: 

Division street, between Acushnet avenue and Second street. 



4 
4 
3 



750 
550 
550 
550 
550 
550 
550 
450 
500 
450 



Jane E. Gilniore, principal, 245 Acushnet avenue, 800 

Susan M. Tompkins, assistant. 2 Court street, 550 

Nellie W. Davis, '* 115 Summer street, 550 

Dora A. DeWolf, - 169 Middle street, 450 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



109 



e- 



Sarah E. Kirwiiif assistant, 

Marion H. Swasey, 

Alice A. Taylor, 

Sophie T. Anthony, 

Eleanor V. Tripp, 

Annie C. O'Connor, 

iiabel Bennett, 

Julia A. Hunt, 

Emma L. Gartland, 



(4 



kC 



kk 



(I 



(k 



Ik 



kk 



kk 



101 South Sixth street, ^50 
Cor. County & Forest sts. 425 



299 County street, 
182 Fourth street, 
12 Sherman street, 
299 (>ounty street, 
79 Chestnut street, 
20 Court street, 
51 Washington street. 



550 
400 
500 
550 
500 
425 
425 



\i Street: 

Cedar street, corner of Maxiield street. 



Annie S. Homer, principal, 
Bessie P. Peirce, assistant, 
Abby D. Whitney, '• 

k^ud 2 Annie L. Edwards, 
Willetta B. Nickerson, 
Mabel L. Hathaway, 

NSONVILLE : 

Rockdale avenue. 



ik 



kk 



117 Hillman street, 
130 Summer street, 
59 Hill street, 
62 North street, 
85 Morgan street, 
743 County street, 



650 
550 
550 
550 
550 
500 



Hud 3 Adelaide J. McFarlin, principal. Cottage & Kempton sts., 550 
and 1 Florence A. Poole, assistant, 16S Mill street, 425 

^UTMOUTH Street: 

Dartmouth street, corner of Hickory street. 

Isadore F. Eldridge, principal, 44 Sherman street. 



and 4 M. Eva Schwall. assistant, 
Edith M. B. Taber, 
Sarah E. Slade, ** 

Nellie H. Cook, 
Annie F. Smith, 
Grace H. Potter, 
Sara H. Kelley, 

OMAS A. Greene School: 



a 



kk 



kk 



11 Bonney street, 
82 Walden street, 
37 Allen street, 
Masonic Building, 
18 Bonney street, 
100 Madison street, 
24 Seventh street. 



700 
550 
500 
400 
500 
550 
550 
550 



Madison street, corner of Fourth street. 



Sarah H. Cranston, principal, 
and 4 Grace Covell, assistant, 

Eliza H. Sanford, '' 

Sarah E. Sears, *• 

and 2 Lillie C. Tillinghast, '' 

Annie L. Macreading, *• 

Ruth E. Howland, 



kk 



129 Elm street, 
128 School street, 
112 Fourth street, 
21 Griffin street, 
32 North Sixth street, 
17 Bonney street, 
Bonney street, 



650 
500 
550 
550 
550 
550 
400 



no 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



Sylvia Ann Howland School: 

Pleasant street, between High and Kempton streets. 



Grade. 

4 Carrie E. Footman, principal, 
3 Mary J. Graham, assistant, 
2 Helen J. Kirk, " 

1 Amelia Lincoln, ^* 

Linden Street: 



72 State street, 
12 Court street, 
27 Franklin street, 
87 Walden street. 



4 

3 
2 
1 
1 



Linden street, near Ashland street. 

Elizabeth P. Spooner, principal, 129 Hillman street, 
Isabella T^usconib, assistant, 
Carrie L. Chapman, 
Ruth M. Tripp, 
Lucy S. Leach, 



hi 



2^5 Cedar street, 
Main street, Fairhaven, 
417 Union street, 
163 Maxfield street. 



Mekrimac Street: 

Merrimac street, corner of State street. 

Ill Merrimac street. 



4 Sarah H. Hewins, principal. 

3 Addie West, assistant, 

2 Annie I. Dexter, " 

I Harriet S. Damon, *' 



232 Pleasant street, 
11 Franklin street, 
223 Pleasant street, 



Maxfield Street: 

Maxfield street, corner of Pleasant street. 



1 
2 
3 
4 



Mar}' B. White, principal, 57 Foster street, 

Annie E. Pearce, assistant, 151 Hillman street, 

Clara C. M. Gage, '' 78 Mill street, 

Mary E. Pasho, ^' 169 Grinnell street, 



ACUSHNET • 



UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 



Acushnet avenue. 



Charlotte C. Carr, principal. 
Belle B. Wheeler, assistant, 
Harriet N. Hyatt, 



(( 



Clark's Point School: 

Mary E. McAuliffe, principal, 

North School: 

Mary 1. Ashley, principal, 
Mary G. Fuller, assistant, 



56 Spring street, 
2 Mt. Vernon street, 
Tarkiln Hill road. 



380 Purchase street, 



Clifford, 
Clifford, 



$600 
550 
550 
550 



600 
550 
500 
425 
550 



600 
.550 
550 
550 



600 
550 
550 
550 



700 
600 
450 



500 



600 
360 



superintendent's report. 



Ill 



MNviLLE School: 

Mary E. Haney, principal, Shawmut, $600.00 

CKDALE School: 

Lillian T. llioraas, principal, Box 275, 550.00 

RTH Mill: 

In Merrimac street school building. 

Emma R. Wentworth, principal, 117 Hillman street, 682.00 
Mary L. Hillman, assistant, 81 Mill' street, 467.50 

jTH Mill: 

In Thompson street school building. 

Lucy J. Remington, principal, 67 Fifth street, 682 00 

Ruby M. Tripp, assistant, 407 Cedar street, 467.50 



SPECIAL teachers. 



AWING : 



Mary W. Gilbert, supervisor, 20 Seventh street, 1,200.00 

Katharine M. Crabtree, assistant, 

and teacher of drawing at 

High school, 26 Seventh street, 800.00 



ClING : 

F. n. Butterfield, supervisor, 

NUAL Training: 
Edwin R. King, 

►king: 

Grace Greenwood, 

riNG : 

Carrie H. Richmond, principal, 
Eliza A. Smalley, assistant, 
Gertrude H. Leonard, '' 



40 Chestnut street, 1,500.00 



175 William street, 1,200.00 



175 William street, 600.00 



43 Fifth street, 600.00 

71 South Sixth street, 525.00 
23 Seventh street, 525.00 



EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

In High school building. 

George H. Nye, principal, 323 Cottage street, $9.00 per week. 
Katharine M. Crabtree, ass't, 26 Seventh street, 6.00 ^^ 
Oliver H. Gardner, '' 197 Chestnut street, 6.00 '* 



112 SUPRHISTKNORNTS REPORT. 

EVENING Er.EMENTARY SCHOOLS. 
Fifth Street: 

George H. Tripp, •S.OOpt 

Grace H. Potter. 3.00 

Nellie H. Cook, 3.00 

.lulln C. GHIbrd, 3.on 

LbzieM. Brifcus. 3,00 

T.tlUe C. TDIlnghaat, .t.OO 

C. T. JohnsoD, 3.00 

HftP McAfee. .1.00 

Marr-T Grabtiiu, 3.00 

Annie L. Burbnuk, 3.00 

Ruth E. HowUnil, 3.00 

MnrioD H. Swasej- 3.00 

.Ssrah E. Stoddard. 3.00 

KatP Moore, 3.00 

Gllllfln Gordon. 3.00 

Parker Stkbet: 

Emma R. WeDtworth, 6.00 

Mary F. Wtide, 3.00 

Emma D. T^rrabee, 3.00 

Reglna M. Pau), 3.00 

JallftW Corlsh. 3.00 

SnraK.Tullinaii, ' 3.00 

E3^^ler W. Paul, 3.00 

Susan Butts, 3.00 

Hbrrihac Street: 

Hary A. Kaue, G.OO 

Harriet I-, Cornell, 3.no 

Sarah A. Klrwin. 3.00 

Florence A. Poole, 3.00 

Margaret Holmen, 3.00 

Ruth E. PenHe. 3.00 

l,lla D. llHiiey. 3.00 

Thompson Street; 

Joseph P. Kennedy, G.OO 

.hitii't Hunter, .1.00 

KatcK Wlicldeij, 3.00 

Annie M. Klitg, 3.00 

Helen Ring, 3.00 

Belle Almy, 3.00 



superintendent's report. 



113 



Emma L. Gartland. 
Fannie Spooner, 
Sophie T. Anthony, 
Marj' T^. Rogers, 

>AR Grove Street: 

Francis J. Heavens, 
Helen McCoy, 
Annie G. Brawley, 
Nannie P. Slocum, 
Myra S. Ashley, 
Lillie McAfee, 
Mary R. Hinckley, 
Dora A. DeWolf, 
Flora £. Estes, 
Lucia E. Bliss, 
Ruth A. Wilde, 
Jennie Gardner, 
Mary E. McAuliffe, 
Abby R. Johnson, 
Sarah Peclcham, 
Anna I. Hathaway, 
E. I^aycocli, 



$3.00 per week. 


3.00 


ki 


3.00 


(« 


3.00 


•(( 


6.00 


ki 


3.00 


Cl 


3.00 


n 


3.00 


ki 


3.00 


ifc 


3.00 


(( 


3.00 


(4 


3.00 


»l 


3.00 


»( 


3.00 


(( 


3.00 


ki 


3.00 


(C 


3.00 


14 


3.00 


i4 


3.00 


k4 


3.00 


,4 


3.00 


44 



GOOD READING 



—FOR— 



BOYS AND GIRLS 



List of Books Suitable for Youths of All Ages, 



Prepared by George H. Tripp, Principal Middle 
Street Grammar School. 



1 IH LIST OF BOOKS. 

Animal Life by the Seashore. A. Heilprin 59211.36 

Another Flock of Girls. Nora Perry P425Aii. 

Anibian Nights. E. E. Hale. Pub. by Ginn & Co. ... 

Arctic Boat Journey. 1. I. Hayes 2063 

Arctic Explorations. E. K. Kane 1599 

Army Life in a Blacli Regiment. T. W. Higginson .... S163.11 

Around the World in the Yacht Sunbeam. Brassey . . . 846.23 

Arthur, Boys' King. S. Lanier L272Bb 

Asbury Twins. Sophie May Co67A 

At the Back of the North Wind. George McDonald . . . MU.At. 

At the South Pole. W. H. G. Kingston 

Aunt Joe's Scrapbag. L. M. Alcott A114* 

Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. Pub. by Ginn & Co. 

Away in the Wilderness. R. M. Ballantyne 

Barnum's Life. P. T. Barnum * 

Battle of New York. Stoddard 

Bazar Book of Decorum. Publishers, Harper Bros. . . . 

Being a Boy. C. D. Warner W242B. 

Ben Hur. Lew Wallace W154B. 

Bible Animals. J. G. Wood S2l4.1n 

Biding His Time. J. T. Trowbridge T756Bi 

Bimbi. L. de La Rame L32Bi 

Birds' Christmas Carol. K. D. Wlggin W637B. 

Birdseye View of the World. O. Reclus 910R24 

•Birdseye View of the Civil War. T. A. Dodge 

Black Beauty. A. Sewall Se84 

Black Ivory. R. M. Ballantyne B21B. 

Blue Fairy Book. A. Lang L25B 

Blue Poetry Book. A. Lang 80S.1L25 

Blue Jackets of 76. W.J.Abbott • 

Blue Jackets of 1812. W.J.Abbott. . ♦ 

Blue Jackets of '61. W. J. Abbott ♦ 

Bobbin Boy, or How Nat Got His Leai*ning. W. M. Thayer 

Bodley Books. Scudder ScU2** 

Bonaparte, Napoleon. J. S. C. Abbott 66^ 

Bonnie Scotland. 8. J. Lippincott 

Hook for Girls and Boys. John Bunyan. Ed. J. Brown . ♦ 

Book of Verse for Boys. Ed. W. E. Henley 

Boone, Daniel. J. S. (J. Abbott A9.1 

Boots and Saddle. Mrs. E. B. Custer ♦ 

Boston Tea Party. Josephine Pollard 

Boston Town. H. E. Scudder 

Boyhood of Great Men . 

Boy, Story of a Bad. T. B. Aldrich Al27St 

Boys Coastwise. W. H. Rideiug 



LIST OF BOOKS. 119 

Boy Emigrants. Noah Brooks B793B 

Boy Engineers. J. Lukin C19.3*< 

Boy Settlers. Noah Brooks B793BO. 

Boy Travellers. T. VV. Knox. Series S.36.10* 

Comprising : 

Boy Travellers in South America 

^' in Siam and Java 

in Japan and China 

in India and Ceylon 

in Egypt and the Holy r.and .... 
in Russian Empire 



n 

'* on the Congo 

** to Great Britain and Ireland 

'* to Northern Europe . . . . 

•' to Central Europe . . . 

" to Southern Europe 



lioys at Chequasset. A. D. T. Whitney W6IB0 

IJoy 8' Book of Sports. M.Thompson 

Boys, Froissart. S. Lanier L272Ba 

Boys' Heroes. E. E. Hale 920H13 

Boys, King Arthur. S. Lanier L272Bb 

lioys' library of Pluck and Action. F. R. Stockton . . . 

Boys, Mabinogion. S. Lanier .... L272Bc 

Boys of Grand Pre School. J. De Mille D393Bo 

Boys of Other Countries. B. Taylor 

Boys of Seventy-six. C. C. Coffin 

Boys of Sixty-one. C. C. Coffin C658B 

Boys of Thirty-five. E. H. Elwell ... 

B. O. W. C. J. De Mille D393Br 

Boys' Own Book of Boats. VV. H. G. Kingston 15782 

Boys, Percy. S. Lanier B6 5 

Boys, Town A. W. D. Howells H830Bo 

Boys Who Became Famous. S. K. Bolton 920BG39 

Xioys' Workshop 

Brant, Joseph. Eggleston & Seelye 9400 

Bric a Brae Stories. Mrs. B. Harrison H24(>B 

Brownie Book. Palmer Cox 

Building the Nation. C. C. Coffin S146.10 

Bullet and Shell. G. F. Williams 

By England's Aid. G. A. Henty 

By Pike and Dike. G. A. Henty H39GBy 

C;spsar, Julius. J. Abbott 1 104 

CJamplife in the Woods. H. H. Gibson 

Uampmatcs. Kirk Munroe M923C 

C^andle, Lecture on a. M. Faraday 



120 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



Captain January. L. E. Richards R392C 

Captain of the Janizaries. Ludlow L964C 

Captain Cook. W. Besant * 

Capture of Wild Beasts. P. T. Barnum B-2(»W 

Car rota. Mrs. L. M. Moles worth 

Carson, Kit. J. 8. C. Abbott A.9.5 

Castle Blair. F. L. Shaw Sh23C 

Cast Away in the Cold. I. L Hayes 

Cast Up by the Sea. S.S.Baker B.176C 

Cats' Arabian Nights. A.M.Diaz 

Celtic Fairy Tales. Jos. Jacobs 398J15 

Century Book for Young Americans. E. E. Hale 342.7 B79 

Ceylon. S. Baker • . 2578A2577 

Charles I. J. Abbott 1195 

Child's History of England. C. Dickens 547 or • 

Child's History of France. C. Yonge 9486 

Child's History of England. C. Yonge 948.5 

Child's History of Germany. C. Yonge 1M84 

Child's History of Greece. C. Yonge »483 

Child's History of Rome. C. Yonge 9487 

Child Life in Poetry. J.G. Whittler 12765 

Child Life in Prose. J. G. Whittier 12764 

Child's Stories in American History. H. C. Wright . . . 

Children's Stories in English Literature. H. C. Wright . . • 

Children of the Castle. Mrs. L.M. Molesworth M73Ch. 

Children of the Cold. Fred. Schwatka 

Christmas Every Day. W. D. Howells H836Ch. 

Christmas Plum-Pudding Stories. L. M. Alcott A114C 

Civil War. J. S. C. Abbott S158.1 

Coal and Coal Mines. Homer Greene 622G83 

Colette, Story of 

Colonel's Money, The. L. C. Lillle I^25C 

Columbus. J. S. C. Abbott A.9.10 

Columbus. W. Irving. Abridged * 

Coming Race, ITie. Bulwer-Lytton BS76Co 

Common Objects by the Seashore. J.G.Wood 6731 

Common Objects of the Country. J. G. Wood 6730 

Common Objects of the Microscope. J. G. Wood .... 6727 

Cook's Voyages. A. Klppes 

Cortez, Hernando. J. S. C. Abbott 1185 

Cooper, Peter. C. E. Lester 5161.1 

Country of the Dwarfs. P. Du Challlu 916.7Dai 

Crockett, David. J. S. C. Abbott • . . . . A.9.6 

Crofton Boys. H. Martlneau M364C 

Cromwell, Oliver. P. Hood . . . • ♦ 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



121 



Crossing the Quicksand. S. W. Cozzens 

Cudjo'sCave. J.T.Trowbridge T7C6Cu 

Cyrus. J. Abbott 1099 

Daddy's Boy. Mrs. L. T. Smith 

Dash lor Khartoum. G. A. Henty 

Darius. J. Abbott 1098 

David Copperfleld. C. Dickens D55D 

Days with Sir Roger de Coverly 

Dear Daughter Dorothy. A. G. Plympton P748D 

I>eb and the Duchess. Mrs. L. T. Smith 

Deep Down (Mining story). R. M. Ballantyne B21D 

Deerslayer. J. F. Cooper C784D 

De Garaa. G. M. Towle 11155 

Derrick Sterling. (A Story of the Mines.) K. Munroe . M923D 

De Soto. J. S. C. Abbott A.9.3 

X>evon Boys. Fenn 

Dick Sands. J. Verne V59d 

JDoctor's Daughter. Sophie May C557d 

IDown the Ravine. Murfree M942D 

X>r. Gilbert's Daughter. M. H. Matthews 

iJo^ Crusoe. R. M. Ballantyne 

Oon Quixote. M. de Cervantes. Abridged. Ginn & Co. 

lyog of Flanders. La Ram6 I^2D 

Dorymates. Kirk Munroe M923Do 

I>rake, Sir Francis. G. M. Towle 11160 

IDrlfting Round the World. C. W. Hall H142D 

Drumbeat of the Nation. C. C. Cotfln ♦ 

TRcce Coelum. E. F. Burr 520.B.94 

£ditha*8 Burglar. Mrs. F. H. Burnett B932E 

^Ki^ht Years' Wandering in Ceylon. S. Baker ..... 2578 

Kight Cousins. L. M. Alcott Al 14E 

Klectrical Toymaking. Sloane 587.8S1.5 

Binglish Fairy Tales. Jos. Jacobs 398J15.1 

C More) English Fairy Tales. Jos. Jacobs 398,115.2 

:E:rling the Bold. R. M. Ballantyne B21E 

:Eyebright. S. C. Woolsey .... W882E 

Kairyland of Flowers. Mara L. Pratt 

li'airyland of Science. Buckley C.9.22 

Familiar Talks with Boys. John Hall 

Family Flight Books. Hale H13Fa 

Kanaous American Statesmen. Mrs. S. K. Bolton .... 920B631 

Famous American Authors. Mrs. S. K. Bolton 920B63 

Famous English Authors. Mrs. S. K. Bolton 920B632 

Famous European Artists. Mrs. S. K. Bolton 920B634 

Famous Types of Womanhood. Mrs. S. K. Bolton .... 920B636 



122 



LIST OF HOOKS. 



SlllF 
SlllFi 
SIllFa 

M923F 

S164.ll 
S162.4 



Famous American Indians. Eggleston & Seelye. 5 vols. 

9457, 9458, 9459, 9460, 9161 

Feats on the Fiord, Norway. H. Martineau M364Fe 

Feet and Wings • 

First Lessons in Our Country's History. Swinton .... 

Five Little Peppers. M. Sidney 

Five Little Peppers Midway. M.Sidney 

Five Little Peppers Grown Up. M. Sidney 

Five Mice in a Mouse Trap. L. E. Richards . 

Flamingo Feathers. Kirk Munroe 

Flaxie Frizzle Stories. 6 vols. Sophie May 

Following the Flag. C. C. Coffin 

Four Years of Fighting. C. C. Coffin 

For the Temple. G. A. Ilinty 

Four Macniols. W. Black 

Franklin. H. H. Weld 

Franklin's Autobiography. Ginn & Co 

Franklin's Life. J. S. (J. Abbott 

Frederick the Great. J. S. C. Abbott 

Freedom Triumphant. C. C. Coffin 

Fresh and Salt Water Aquarium. J. G. Wood 

Friends Woith Knowing. E. Ingersoll 

From Earth to the Moon. J. Verne 

From Forecastle to Cabin. S. Samuels 

From Lakes of Killarney to Golden Horn. H. M. Field . 

From Throttle to President's Chair. Ellis 

Fulton and Steam Navigation. (Putnam) 

Fun and Wisdom. J. C. Hervey 

Garfield, James A. J. M. Bundy 

Garlands for Girls. L. M. Alcott 

Geological Story Briefly Told. J. D. Dana 

Giavetta. R. Mulholland 

Giovanni and the Other. Mrs F. H. Burnett 

Girls Who Became Famous. Mrs. S. K. Bolton 

Girls and I. Mrs. Moles worth .... 

Golden Deeds. C. Yonge 

Good Night Poetry. Ed. W. P. Garrison 

Good Manners 

Gordon, Chinese. .\rch. Forbes 

Gorilla Country. P. Du Chaillu 1)16.7D8.">1 



A9.12 
1242 

S96.17 

V59FS 

* 

S46.28 



A 1 UGr 

M8990 
B932G 
920B6a^ 



Gorilla Hunters. K. M. Ballantyne 
Gough, .1. B., Autobiography . . . 
Grandfather's Chair. Hawthorne . 
Grant, U. S. P. C. Headley .... 
Great Bonanza. C. W. Hall . . . . 



B2lGo 

1111 

H314Tr 

1111 

U1426 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



123 



Great Voyages and Travels of 18th Century. ) y ^^ 

Great Explorers of 19th Century >■*' !^"*^ 

Great Navigators of 18th Century .....)' 

Greek FTeroes. C. Kingsley 

Green Fairy Book. A. Lang 

Green Mountain Boys. D. P. Thompson 

Greenwood's Juveniles. S. J. Lippincott. 8 vols .... 

Grimm's Household Tales G8SH 

Gulliver's Travels. J. Swift. Abridged 

Guy Mannering. W. Scott. Abridged 

Gutta Percha Willie. George MacDonald 

Gypse}' Series. E. S. Phelps. 4 vols 

Half Hours with the Telescope. R. A. Proctor 

Half Hours with the Stars. R. A. Proctor 

Hamilton. Alexander. S.^M. Smucker 

Hamlet. Pub. Ginn & Co., or Effingham, Maynard & Co . 

Hancock, Gen. W. S F. E. Goodrich 

Hannibal. J. Abbott 

Hans Brinker, or the Silver Skates. M. M. Dodge .... 

Harry Blount. P. G. Hamerton 

Henry, Patrick. W. Wirt 

Heroes of England. J. G. Edgar 

Heroes of the Desert. Pub. T. Nelson & Co 

Heroic Ballads. Ed. D. H. Montgomery ... 

Hetty Gray. E.Mulholland 

Hints to Our Boys. A. J. Symington 

His Level Best. E. E. Hale 

His One Fault. J. T. Trowbridge 

Historic Boys and Girls. E. S. Brooks 

History of the Atlantic Telegraph. H. M. Field 

History of the Fnited States. T. W. lligginson 

History' of Our Country. A. S. Richardson 

Heidi. Spyri 

Hold Up Your Heads, Girls. A. IL Ryder 

Holmes, O. W., Poems of 

Uoosier Scliool Boy. E. Egglesron 

Hoosier School Master. K. Eggleston 

How 1 Found Livingstone. H. M. Stanley 

How Success is Won. S. K. Bolton 

How They Went to Europe. M. Sidney 

How to Camp Out. J.M.(iould 

How to Do It. E. E. Hale 

How to Get Strong. William Blaikle 

Ice Queen, The. Ernest Ingersoll • • 

In Freedom's Cause. G. A. flenty . . 



10761 



L25Gr 
T37Gr 

or G88C 

MUG 

15635 
6095 



1102 
D663n 

ni72n 

762 
1407 



M899He 

H13H 
T756H 

5951 

973H53 

S144.7 

Sp.97II 

2836 

Eg31H 

Eg31IIo 

2296 

920B637 

796G73 

ni3* 

613.7B57 
In42I 



124 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



In His Name. E. E. Hale ni3l 

III the King's Name. G. M. Fenn 

In the Keign of Terror. G. A. Henty 

Iliad, Story of the. A. J. Church 

Iliad, Story of the. E. Brooks B7917S 

Innocents Abroad, The. S. L. Clemens 2341 

Insects Abroad. J. G. Wood S.215.14 

Insects at Home. J. G. Wood S.222.15 

In the Tennessee Mountains. Murfree M142ln 

Ivanhoe. W. Scott Sco82l 

Ivanhoe. Published by Giun & Co 

Jackanapes. • Mrs. J. H. Ewing Ew6,J 

Jack Hall. Robert Grant G764,I 

.lack Hazzard. (Series.) J. T. Ti*owbridge ♦ 

Jan of the Windmill. Mrs. J. H. Ewing Ewo.Ia 

Jenny Wren's Boarding House. • James Otis. (Kaler) . . Kr25«Te 

Jimmy's Cruise in the Pinafore. L. M. Alcott An4»Ii 

Jolly P'ellowship, A. F. R. Stockton St6J 

Jones, Paul. J. S. C. Abbott A9.8 

Jo's Boys. L. M. .\lcott An4.Jo 

Joyous Story of Toto. Mrs. L. E. Richards R392.I 

Julius Caesar. Classics for Children. Ginn & Co 

Jungie Book. R. Kipling KG28J 

Kidnapped. R. L. Stevenson St49K 

King of the Golden River. J. Ruskin 6334 

King's Daughter. Mrs. Alden. (Pansy.) A122K 

Knockabout Club. (Series.) C. A. Stephens 

Knocking 'Round the Rockies. E. Ingersoll 

La Salle. J. S. C. Abb6tt A9.9 

Last Words. Mrs. J. H. Ewing EwoL 

Last of the Mohicans. .1. F. Cooper C784L 

Lawrence's Adventures. J. T. Trowbridge T756L 

l.SLy» of Ancient Rome. T. B. Macaulay B6.3 

[Or, in Children's Classics.] 

Learning to Draw. VioUet Le Due . . . • • 

Library of Poetry and Song. W. C. Bryant ....*. 2698 

Life and Her Children. A.Buckley C923 

Lincoln, Life of. C. C. Coffin ♦ 

Lincoln, Anecdotes of. F. B. Carpenter 8414 

Little Flowers of St. Francis of Assisi. Tr. A. L. Alger 

Little Jarvis. M. E. Sewall 

Little Lucretia. M. E. Wilkins . . . • • * 

Little Men. L. M. Alcott AlUL 

Little Lord Fauntleroy. F. H. Burnett • • . B932Li 

Little Miss Peggy. Mrs. M. L. Molesworth M73L 



LIST OF nOOKS. 



125 



St. Elizabeth. F. II. Burnett 

People. Stella L. Hook 

e-by-the-flre. Mrs. .1. II. £wing 

ellow's Poems 

n the Jungle. P. B. DuChaillu 

J Library. (Series.) L. M. Alcott 

Women. L. M. Aleott 

m IIow and I^dy Why. C. Kingsley 

ig of the Great West. S. A. Drake 

►f-war Life. C. Nordhoff 

Vithout a Country. K. E. Hale 

ling to Victory. C. C. Coffin 

» Polo. J. Abbott 

jls of the New West. W. M. Thayer 

ion. Sir W. Scott 

rman Ready. Capt. Marryatt 

r Rockafeller's Voyage. W. Clark Russell 

•lowers. H. B. Stowe • • 

•f Iron. II. Pyle . 

f Science. Mrs. S. K. Bolton 

lant of Venice. (Ginn & Co.) 

Adventures of Robin Hood. II. Pyle 

elmas Daisy. Sarah Doudney 

ipman Paulding. M. E. Sewall 

», and Other Sketches. .1. C. Harris 

xilbert's Career. J. G. Holland 

•n Vikings. II. II. Boyesen 

derriam's Scholars. E. E. Hale 

)verthevvay-s Remembrances. Mrs. J. H. Ewing . . 

:>ys. L. M. Aleott . 

iris. L. M. Aleott 

ays and Nights on the Battlefield. V, C. Coffin . . . 

ululu. II. M. Stanley 

zuma. Eggleston and Seelye 

al History. J. G. \^'ood 

al History. .1. Johonnot • 

al IIi8torj\ Riverside 

ern California, Oregon, and Sandwich islands. (-. 

ordhoff 

Bedford. Ricketson 

Bedford. Ellis 

penings, or The Bee Hunters. »L F. Cooper .... 

Steamships. F. E. Chadwick 

ey, Story of. Edw. Brooks 

ey. Story of. A. J. Church 



B932Lk 



2807 

D852L 

A114LU 

AlULi 

978D78 

H13Ma 

* 

11158 
9178T33 

M347M 



POOlMe 
J)20Ba35 



l»l)91M 



II24iM 
II712M 

H13M 

EwoM 

A114Mb 

A114Mg 

9774 

St22M 

9461 

0748 



10822 
9748 

C7840 

656C34 

B7917St 



126 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



Old-fashioued Girl. T.. M. Alcott A1140I 

Old Times in the Colonies. C. C. Coffin S14o.lI 

Oliver Goldsmith. W. J. Rolfe . 

Only Girls. Virginia Townsend 

Open Sesame. Pub. Ginn & Co 

Other Girls. A. D. T. Whitney W610t 

Otto of the Silver Hand. II. Pyle PU910 

Our Boys in India. II. W. French 

Our Helen. Sophie May 05570 

Our Town. Margaret Sidney SI 110 

Palace In the (Jarden. Mrs. Molesworth ... B173P 

Paul and Virginia C568 

Peasant and Prince. H. Martineau M364Pe 

Personally Conducted. F. R. Stockton 914St6 

Peter Budstone, the B03' who was Hazed. J. T. 'I'rowbridge TrSCPe 

Peterkln Papers. T.. P. Hale HI3ir 

Peterkins, Last of the. L.P.Hale H13I/. 

Phil and the Baby. L. L. Llllie 

Philip. J. S. C. Abbott . 1188 

Picclno. Mrs. F. H. Burnett 

Plcciola. X. Saintaine Sa23P 

Pilgrim's Progress. J. Bunyan St77L and * 

Pilot, The. J. F. Cooper C784Pb 

Pioneer, The. J. F. Cooper C784Pc 

Pioneer Boy. VV. M. Thayer 10631 

Pictorial History of Greece. S. G. Goodrich 

Picturesque Europe * 

Pizarro. J. Abbott \\\^ 

Phaeton Rogers. Rosslter Johnson 

Philip Nolan's Friends. E. E. Hale H13P 

Pleasant Cove Stories. (Series.) E. Kellogg .... * 

Presidents, Lives of the. W.O.Stoddard * 

Plucky Boys. D. M. Craik 

Plutarch. Abridged. Glnn & Co .^ 

Poems. Selected for Children. Rolfe, Harper's 

Poetry for Children. Ed. Samuel Elliott. H. M. & Co. . 

Politics for Young Americans. C. Nordhoff 8656 

Poor Boys Who Became Famous. S. K. Bolton 920B ♦ 639 

Poor Girls Who Became Famous. S. K. Bolton ♦ 

Pot of Gold. M. E. VVilkins Wr»S3P 

Pretty Sister of Jose. Mrs. Burnett BU32Pr 

Prince and the Pauper. S. C. Clemens C592P 

]*rince Dusty. Kirk Mun roe 

Printer Boy. W.M.Thayer 10077 

Pyrrhus. .1. Abbott ....•• 1101 



LIST OF HOOKS. 



127 



^ 9-159 

>rie9 for Boys and Girls. E. EgglestoD 

His Friends. J. Brown 

J. Abbott 11159 

G. M. Towle ♦ 

lannerman^s Boyhood. G. MacDonald M14R 

H. 11. Jackson .F13R 

Its. A. D. T. Whitney VV61R 

Children. Mrs. Molesworth M73R 

Y Book. A. Lang ... L25R 

er Stories. Spyri 

;r. J. F. Cooper C784R 

tative British Orations. C. K. Adaiu^s ♦ 

and Jingles. M. M. Dodge . . 

First. J. Abbott 1191 

Second. J. Abbott 1192 

Third. J. Abbott 1193 

Winkle W.Irving lr82S 

•y for Boys. M.Sidney SUlRo 

Crusoe. D. Defoe D363R 

lllianis. W. Gannnell 

jksof Travel. J. Abbott 

. J. Abbott 1103 

Garden of Girls. N. Perrv P425R 

Uoora. L. M. Alcott A114R 

out Papers. W. M. Thackeray 12439 

3ut Rambles. F. R. Stockton 

rrange. F. R. Stockton St6R 

Selections from. (Ginn&Co.) 

). Smiles 374Sm.4 

las. Magazine ♦ 

^e and the Dragon. M.Sidney SlUS 

ve. F. H. Burnett B932Sa 

Iris. A. Carey 

istory of England and France. J. .1. Anderson . 

fe and Boyhood. Ed. P. Fitzgerald 

f Common Things. I). A. Wells * 

Chiefs. Jane Porter 1*833S 

of Devon. G. M. Towle 11159 

raps. (Travel.) L. M. Alcott A114S 

Gen. W.T. P. C. Headley 

Franklin. A. 11. Beesley S287.6 

hs at the White House. F. B. Carpenter .... 10678 

cteen. J. H. Ewing 

3ok. W. Irving IrSiS 



128 



LIST OF HOOKS. 



Sketches of Natural History. M. Howitt . 

Soldiers and i^atriots of the Revohition. .1. Banvard . . . 

Speech aud Manners. E. S. Kirkland 

Sports and Pastimes for American Boys. H. Chjuiwick . . 

Spy, The. J. F. Cooper C784Si» 

Squire's Daughter, The. T.. L. TJllle L625Sq 

Starland. Ball • .523B211 

Stories for Home Folks, S. .F. Lippincott 

Stories from Greek Tragedies. A. .1. Church C472Sg 

Stories from Livy, A. J. Church C472S1 

Stories from the Bible. A. J. Church 221C4I 

Stories from Old English Poetry. A. S. Richardson . . . 

Stories from Virgil. A. J. Church C47iSv 

Stories Grandma Told. M. I). Brine 

Story of liberty. C. C. Coffin S179.8 

Stories of American Progress. H. C. Wright 

Stories of the Gorilla Country. P. B. Du Chaillu D852ror9l6.7orl>S51 

Stories of Discovery. E. E. Hale H13S 

Stories of Invention. E. E. Hale H13.Sa 

Stories of the Sea. E. E. Hale Hl3Sb 

Stories of War. E.E.Hale H1.3S<; 

Story of the Great March. G. W. Nichols S164.7 

Stories of the Old World. A. J. Church 292C47 

Story of the U. S. Navy. B. J. Lossing 3591^ 

Standish, Miles. J.S. C.Abbott A9.2 

Story of a Bad Boy. T. B. Aldrich Al27St 

Starry Flag. (Series.) W. T. Adams AdlS.Sr 

Stevens, -\lex. H. F. H. Norton 

Strange Dwellings. J. G. Wood S.565.1 

Stuyvesant, Peter. J. S. C. Abbott A.9.4 

Swiss Family Robinson W99S 

Swiss Stories. .J. Spyri Sp97S 

Sunshine in Life. F. P. Lee 

Tales. H. C. Andersen An23T 

Tales from Shakespeare. C. and M. T^amb \A&XV 

Tales of a Grandfather. W. Scott ♦ 

Tales of a Traveller. W. Irving Ir82T 

Tales of Chivalry. W. .1. Rolfe 

Talisman. W. Scott Sco82T 

Ten Boys Who Lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now. 

J. Andrews 

Tecumsch 9457 

Ten (ireat Events in History. .1. .lohonnot 

Tennyson for the Young. Rolfe 

That C^ueer Girl. V. Townsend T663T 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



129 



There She Blows. W. H. Macy 

Three Boys in an Electrical Boat. J. Trowbridge .... 1756T 

Three Greek Children. A. J. Church C472Th 

lliree Scouts. J. T. Trowbridge T756 

Through the Fray. G. A. Henty 

Tide Mill Stories. (Scries.) J.T.Trowbridge * 

Hp Cat. L. T. Smith ♦ 

Toby Tyler, or Ten Weeks with a Circus. Kaler K125T 

Tom Brown at Oxford. T. Hughes H874T 

Tom Brown at Rugby. T. Hughes H874S 

Tonty. M. H. Catherwood 

To the Lions. A. J. Church C472To 

Toto's Merry Winter, h. E. Richards * R392T 

Trades. Tropics, and Roaring Forties. Brassey ♦ 

True Story Book. A. Lang 904L25 

Treasure Island. R. L. Stevenson St49T 

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. J. Verne . . . Vo9Tw 

Twice Told Tales. N.Hawthorne H314Tw 

Two Great Retreats. D. H. Montgomery 

Two Little Confederates. T.N.Page .\ . . . . PJ41T 

Two Thousand Years Ago. A. J. Church . . C472T 

Two Years Before the Mast. R.H.Dana 6051.106 

Uncle Remus. J. C. Harris U242Un 

Under False Colors. S. Doudney 

Uncle Tom's Cabin. H. B. Stowe St77U 

Under the Lilacs. L. M. Alcott • . . . . A114U 

Vassar Girls. (Series.) E. Champney C357T 

Victoria. S. J. Lippincott * 

Vice Versa. F. A. Guthrie VoMFs 

Walks Abroad with Two Naturalists. Beaugraud .... 

Wandering in South America. C. Wateiton . . • . . . S37.23 

Wanted. 1 M. Alden » A122W 

War of the Union. J. D. Champlln S375.1 

Washington. H. E. Scudder 

Washington. Irving and John Fiske * 

Water Babies. C. Kingsley K612W 

Webster, Daniel. S. P. Lyman 969 

We Girls. A. D. T. Whitney W61W 

Wept of Wish-Ton- Wish. J.F.Cooper C784We 

Whaling and Fishing. C. Nordhoff 

What Career. E. E. Hale 174H13 

Whittier's Poems 811W612 

Wild Scenes In South America. Paez . 10851 

William the Conqueror. J.Abbott 1190 

Winuhig His Way. War Story. C. C. Coffin 



130 LIST OF BOOKS. 

Witch Winnie : Story of a King*8 Daaghter. E. Champney C357W 

With Lee in Virginia. G. A. Henty H314W 

With Rifle and Hound in Ceylon. S. Baker 2577 

Wonderful City of Tokio. E. Greey 

Wonder Clock. H. Pyle P991Wo 

Wonder Stories. H. C. Andersen An23W 

Wonders of Science. Mayhew 

Wonder Stories of Science. A. B. Harris 

Wonder Book. N. Hawthorne H314W 

Yellow Fairy Book. A. Lang L25Y 

Young America Abroad. (Series.) W. T. Adams .... ♦ 
Young Folks' Cyclopedia of Common lliings. J. D. 

Champlin .... C17.20 

Young Folks' Cyclopedia of Persons and Places. J. D. 

Champlin Reference B 

Young Folks' Astronomy. J. D. Champlin 520C35 

Young Folks' History of America. H. Butterworth . . . 9482 
Young Folks' History of the United States. T. W. Hig- 

ginson 8146.15 

Young Lucretia. M. E. Wilkins • . . . . 

Young l*eople, Harpers'. (Magazine.) ♦ 

Young Yager. M. Reid R272Yo 

Young Nimrods in North America. T. W. Knox K77Y 

Young Nimrods Around the World. T. W. Knox ... K77Yo 

Youths' History of the Rebellion. W. M. ITiayer .... 9773 

Young Mechanic. Pub. Putnam 

Xerxes. J. Abbott 1097 

Zigzag Journeys. (Series.) H. Butterworth B983Z 



LIST OP BOOKS. Irfl 

Abbott, Jamb. 

AlenDder 1100 

Alfred 1189 

Cteai 1101 

Charles I 1186 

Hannibal IIOS 

PiMiTO 11166 

IVbas 1101 

Polo, Maruo 11168 

Ealelfjh 11169 

Richard I 1191 

Richard II 1193 

Richard III 1183 

RomuluB ' 1103 

wmiain. . 1190 

Xerxea 1097 

Abbott, J. 8. C. 

Bonaparte 668 

Boone A8.1 

CaraoQ, Kit A8.B 

Clrtl War S1B8.1 

Columbus A9.10 

Cort«z 118S 

Crocfatt A9.G 

De Solo A9.3 

Franklin A9.12 

Frederick 1242 

La Salle A9.9 

Philip 1183 

Standish Ae.2 

Slufveftani A9.4 

Abbott, W. J. 

Blue JackeU of 76 • 

Blue JackeU of 1612 

Blue Jackets of '61 • 

Adams, C K. 

British Orations • 

Adams, W. T. (Oliver Optic.) 

All Over 'the World. (SeHcs.) AdlSAiii 

Young America Abroad. (Series.) * 

Fables 12778 

Alcott, L. M. 

Aunt Jo's Surap-Bac A114* 

ChrUtmas rium-Paddltig AlUC 



132 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



Eight Cousins 

Garlands for Girls 

Jimmy's Cruise 

Jo's Boys 

Little Men 

IJttle Women 

Lulie's Library. (Series.) . . 

My Boys 

My Girls 

Old Fashioned Girl 

Rose in Bloom 

Shawl Straps 

Under the Lilacs 

Alden, I. M. (Pansy.) 

King's Daughter 

Wanted 

Andrews, Jane. 

Ten Boys 

Aldrich, T. B. 

Bad Boy, Story of 

Alger, A. L. Tr. 

IJttle Flowers of St. Francis 
Andersen, H. C. 

Tales . • 

Wonder Stories 

Ball, Sir Robert S. 

Starland 

Ballard, J. P. 

Among Moths and Butterflies 
Ballantyne, K. M. 

Away in the Wilderness . . . 

Black Ivory 

Deep Down 

Dog Crusoe 

Erling the Bold 

Gorilla Hunters 

Baker, Sir Samuel. 

Cast Up by the Sea 

Eight Years in Ceylon . . . . 

Rifle and Hound in Ceylon . . 
Barnum, P. T. 

Capture of Wild Beasts . . . 

Life 

Barrltt, L. 

All the World Over 



AlUlC 

A114G 

A114Ji 

A114J0 

A114L 

A114U 

A]14Ln 

A114Mb 

A114Mg 

A11401 

A114R 

A114S 

A114U 

AI22K 
A122W 



A127St 



An23T 
An23W 



B21B 
B21D 

B21E 
B21G 

B176C 
2578 
2677 

B268W 



List OF BOOKS. 133 

Banvard, J. 

Soldiers and Patriots of the Revolution 

Beard, D. C. 

American Boys' Handy Book 790B3S 

Beard, L. & A. 

American (iirls' Handy Book 790B3S1 

Beaugrand. 

Walks Abroad with Two Naturalists 

Beesley, A. H. 

Sir John Franklin S287.6 

Besant, W. 

Captain Cook ♦ 

^iart, L. 

Adventures of Young Naturalist 

Black, W. 

Four Macniols 

£laikie. W. 

How to Get Strong G13.7B57 

Colton, Mrs. 8. K. 

Boys Who Became Famous 920B6:^9 

Famous American Statesmen 920B631 

Famous American Authors 920BG3 

Famous English Authors 920B632 

Famous European Artists 920B634 

Famous Types of Womanhood 920B636 

Girls Who Became Famous 920B638 

How Success is Won 920B637 

Men of Science 920B635 

Boyesen, H. H. 

Against Heavy Odds B697Ag 

Modern Vikings 

Brassey, Lady. 

Around the World 84C.23 

Trades, Tropics, etc ♦ 

•Brine, M. D. 

Stories Grandma Told 

Brooks, E. 

Hiad ; . B7917S 

Odyssey B7917St 

Brooks, E. S. 

Historic Boys and Girls 

Brooks, N. 

Boy Emigrants B793B 

Boy Settlers B793Bo 



134 



LIST OF BOOkS. 



Brown, John. 

Book for Girls and Boys * 

Rab and His Friends ♦ 

Bryant, W. C. 

Library of Poetry and Song 2698 

Buckley, A. 

Animals from the Life * 

Fairyland of Science C9.22 

Life and Her Children C9.23 

Bulwer, Ix)rd E. Lytton. 

Oming Race, The B876Co 

Bundy, J. M. 

J. A. Gai-field 

Bunyan, J. 

Pilgrim's Progress St77f" 

Burnett, Mrs. F. H. 

Editha's Burglar Bd32^^ 

Giovanni and Other Stories Bd320^ 

Little Lord Fauntleroy B93iL^ 

Little St. Elizabeth Bd32Lk -^ 

Piccino 

Pretty Sister of Jos6 B932Pr ' 

Sara Crewe 

Butter worth, Ilezekiah. 

Zigzag Journeys BdS3Z 

Burr, E. F. 

Ecce Coelum 620B94 

Camp, Walter. 

American Football 797C15 

Carey, A. 

School Girls 

Carey, Alice and Phebe. 

Poems S53.dO 

Carpenter, F. B. 

Anecdotes of Lincoln 8414 

Six Months at the White House 10678 

Gather wood, M. H. 

Tonty 

Chadwick, F. E. 

Ocean Steamships 656C34 

Sports and Pastimes for Boys . 

Champney, E. 

Vassar Girls. Series . C3671' 

Witch Winnie C367W 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



135 



[^hamplin, J. D. 

War of the Union S375.1 

Young Folks' Astronomy o*iOC35 

Young Folks' Cyclopedia of Common Things C17.20 

Young Folks' Cyclopedia of Persons and Places . . . Reference 

Church, A. J. 

Iliad, Story of 

Odyssey, Story of 

Stories from Qreek Tragedies C472Sg 

Stories from Livy C472S1 

Stories from the Bible 2)1047 

Stories from Virgil C472Sv 

Stories of the Old World 292C47 

Thi-ee Greek Children C472Th 

To the Lions C472To 

Two Thousand Years Ago C472 T 

I^leraens, S. L. 

Innocents Abroad 2;i41 

Prince and Pauper C592P 

Ooffin, C. C. 

Boys of '76 

Boys of '61 C668B 

Building the Nation S145.10 

Drumbeat of the Nation * 

Following the Flag 8164.11 

Four Years of Fighting 8162.4 

Freedom Triumphant 

Lincoln ♦ 

Marching to Victory ♦ 

My Days and Nights on the Battlefield 9774 

Old 'Hmes in the Colonies 814.5.11 

Story of Liberty 8179.8 

Coolidge, Susan. See 8. C. Woolsey. Call by titles. 

Cooper, J. F. 

Afloat and Ashore C784A 

Deerslayer C784D 

Last of the Mohicans C784L 

Oak Openings C7840 

Pilot C784Pb 

Pioneer C784Pi 

Red Rover C784R 

Spy C784Sp 

Wept of Wish-Ton-Wish C784We 

Cox, Palmer. 

Brownie Book 



136 LIST OF BOOKS. 

Cozzens, S. W. 

Crossing the Quicksands 

Craik, D. M. M. 

Adventures of a Brownie 

Plucky Boys 

Custer. Mrs. K. B. 

Boots and Saddle * 

Dana, J. D. 

Geological Story Briefly Told 

Dana, R. H., Jr. 

Two Years Before the Mast 605lA^ 

Defoe. 

Robinson Crusoe D36i^ 

De Mllle, J. ^^ 

Boys of Grand Pre School D:i93r^^ 

B. O. W. C D3a3^^ 

Dhiz, A. M. 

Cats' Arabian Nights 

Dickens, C. 

Child's History of England 547 or ^ 

David Copperfield DdoIC^ 

Dodge, M. M. 

Hans Brinker, or the Silver Skates D6(>3H^ 

Dodge, T. A. 

Blrdseye View of Civil War 

Dodgsdon, O. L. 

Alice In Wonderland D605A 

Doudney, Sarah. 

Michaelmas Daisy 

Drake, S. A. 

Making of the Great West 978D7S 

Du Chaillu, P. 

Country of Dwarfs 916.7D85 

Gorilla Country 91(i.7D85l 

Lost In the Jungle D852L 

Egglestou, Edward. 

Hoosier School Boy Eg3lII 

lloosier School Master EgSlFIo 

Eggleston, Edward and L. E. Seelye. 

Famous American Indians 9457, 9459, 9460, 94G1 

Elliott, Samuel (Ed). 

Poetry for Children 

Ellis, E. S. 

From the Throttle to the President's Chair 

Ellis, L. B. 

History of New Bedford ♦ 



LIST OF BOOKS. 187 

Ehvell, E. H. 

Boys of Thirty-flvc 

Ewin^, Mrs. J. H. 

Jackanapes Ew5tJ 

Jan of Windmill Ew5Ja 

I^st Words EwoL 

Lob-lie-by-the-fire 

Mrs Overtheway's Ketnenibrances Kw6M 

Six to Sixteen 

Faraday, Michael. 

Lecture on a Candle 

Fenelon. F. de S. 

relemachus F35 T 

Fenn, G. M. 

Devon Boys 

In the King's Name 

Field, H. M. 

From Lakes of Killarnev to the Golden Horn .... S4().28 

History of the Atlantic Telegraph 5051 

Fitzgerald, P. (Ed.) 

School Life and Boyhood 

F'orbes, Archibald. 

Chinese Gordon ♦ 

Franklin, Benjamin. 

Autobiography 

French, H. W. 

Our Boys in India 

Gam well, W. 

Roger Williams 

Garrison, W. P. (Ed.) 

Good-Night Poetry 

Gibson, H. H. 

Camplife in the Woods 

Goodrich, F. E. 

Hancock, Gen. W. S 

Goodrich, S. G. 

Pictorial History of Greece 

Gould, J. M. 

How to Camp Out 706G73 

Gough, J. B. 

Autobiography 1111 

Grant, Robert. 

Jack Hall G704J 

Greene, Homer. 

Coal and Coal Mines ()22G83 



18« 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



Greey, Edw. 

Wonderful City of Tokio -. . . . 

Grim 111. 

Household Tales G8SH or GJ^Sl 

Guthrie, F. A. 

Vice Versa VillF^ 

Hale, E. E. 

Arabian Nights 

Boys' Heroes 920H^^ 

Century Book 342.7B^' 

His Level Best Hl.^ 

How to Do It H13 

In His Name Hia 

Man Without a Country H13M- 

Mrs. Merriam's Scholar HK^> -^ 

Philip Nolan's Friends HISF^ 

Stories of Discovery H13^^ 

Stories of Invention H13Sa^ 

Stories of Sea H13Sb^ 

Stories of War H13Sc ' 

What Career 174H13 

Halo, E. E. and Susan. 

Family Flight. Series H13Fa 

Hale, L. P. 

Peterkin Papers H131P 

Pete rkins, Last of the H131L 

Hall, John. 

Familiar Talks with Boys 

Hall, C. W. 

Adrift in the Ice Fields HU2A 

Drifting Round the World H142D 

(ireat Bonanza HU2G 

ilamcrton, P. G. 

Harry Blount U172H 

Harris, A. B. 

American Authors for Young Folks 920H24 

Harris, J. C. 

Mingo U242M 

Incle Remus U242rn 

Harrison, Mrs. B. 

liric-a-Brac Stories H24HB 

Ilawihorno. N. 

Grandfather's Chair II314Tr 

Twice Told Tales H3l4Tw 

Wonder liook H314W 



LIST OF BOOKS. 139 

Hayes, 1. I. 

Arctic Boat Journey '2003 

Headley, P. C. 

Grant. Gen. U. S 

Sherman, W. T 

Hellprin, Angelo. 

Animal Life by the Seashore 592m6 

Henley, W. E. (Ed.) 

Book of Verse for Boys 

Henty, G. A. 

By England's Aid 

By Pike and Dike H390By 

Dash for Khaitoum 

For the Temple 

In Freedom's Cause 

In the KelgD of Terror 

Through the Fray 

With Lee In Virginia II314W 

Ilervey, J. C. 

Fun and Wisdom 

Higglnson, T. W. 

American Explorers 11154 

Army Life in a Black Regiment S1G3.11 

History of United States. (Large.) 073H53 

Young Folks' History 8140.15 

Holland, J. G. 

Miss Gilbert's Career I17r2M 

Holmes, O. W. 

Poe!us 2830 

Hood, P. 

Oliver Cromwell ♦ 

Hook, S. L. 

Little People 

Howells, W. D. 

Boy's Town, A II830Bo 

Christmas Every Day HS30rh 

llowitt, Mary. 

Sketches of Natural History 

Hughes, Thomas. 

Tom Brown's School Days H874S 

Tom Brown at Oxford 1I874T 

Ingersoll, Ernest. 

Friends Worth Knowing 

Ice Queen In421 

Knocking Round the Rockies 



140 LIST OF BOOKS. 

Irving, Washington. 

Columbus. Abridged ♦ 

Rip Van Winlsle lr82S 

Sketch Book Ir828 

Tales of a Traveller IrSn' 

Jackson, H. II. 

Kamona J13B 

Jacobs, Joseph. 

vEsop's Fables 888.(5J15 

Celtic Fairy Tales 398J1.% 

English Fairy Tales 398JloA 

More English Fairy Tales 398.115.:^ 

Johonnot, James. 

Natural History 

Ten Great Events in History 

Johnson, Rossiter. 

Phaeton Rogers * 

Kane, Elisha. 

Arctic Explorations 159?^ 

Kaler, J. O. (James Otis.) 

Jenny Wren's Boardhig House K 125.1^:^ 

Toby Tyler KliaT ^ 

Kellogg, Elijah. 

Pleasant Cove Series ♦ 

Kingsley, Charles. 

Greek Heroes 

Madam How and Lady Why 

Water Babies . . . .' KC12W 

Kingston, W. H. G. 

At the South Pole 

Boys' Own »ook of Boats 15782 

Kipling, Rudyard. 

Jungle Book KfriSJ 

Kirkland, E. S. 

Speech and Manners 

Kippis, Andrew. 

Cook's Voyages 

Knox, T. W. 

Boy Travellers. Series S36.10 and ♦. See title list. 

Young Nimrods K77Y 

Young Nimrods K77Yo 

Laboulaye, E. 

Abdallah LIMA 

Lamb, C. and M. 

Tales from Shakespeare L162T 



LIST OF BOOKS. 141 

Lang, Andrew. 

Blue Fairy Book L25B 

Blue Poetry Book 808.1L25 

Green Fairy Book L25Gr 

Red Fairy Book L2oR 

True Story Book 9(UL2o 

Yellow Fairy Book L2oY 

Lanier, Sidney. 

Boys' Froissart L272Ba 

Boyg' King Arthur L272Bb 

Boys* Mabinogion L272Be 

Boys' Percy B6.5 

La Ranie, L. de. 

Bimbi L32BI 

Dog of Flanders I^2D 

I^ Due, Viollet. 

Learning to Draw 

Loe, F. P. 

Sunshine in Life 

Tester, C. E. 

Cooper, Peter 5101.1 

Lillie, Lucy L. 

The Coloners Money L02.5C 

Phil and the Baby 

Squire's Daughter I^2r)Sq 

Lippincott, S. J. (Grace Greenwood.) 

Bonnie Scotland 

Greenwood's Juveniles. 8 vols 

Stories for Home Folks 

Victoria ♦ 

Longfellow, H. W. 

Poems 2807 

Ivossing, B. J. 

Story of United States Navy 3591^9 

Ludlow. 

Captain of the Janizaries I.9G4C 

Lukin, J. 

Boy Engineers C19.38 

Lyman, S. P. 

Daniel Webster 969 

Macaulay, T. B. 

Lays of Ancient Rome ... BG.3 

Macdonald, George. 

At the Back of the North Wind M14At 

Gutta Percha Willie M14G 



-•c 



142 LIST OF BOOKS. 

Ronald Banncnnan M14K 

Macy, W. H. 

There She Blows 

Markham, R. 

Aboard the Mavis M34A 

Marrjatt, Capt. 

Masterinan Readj' M347M 

Martineau, Harriet. 

Crofton Boys M304^ 

Feats ou the Fiord M364l^^ 

Peasant and Prince M804 

Matthews, M. H. 

Dr. r,ill>erfs Daughter 

*SMay Sophie/' (Rebecca S. Clark ) 

Asbury Twins Ciuu 

Doctor's Daughter 0557 f 

Our Helen V't'uW^ 

Mayhew. 

Wonders of Science 

Mitchell, D. G. 

About Old Story Tellers 

Molesworth. Mrs. M. L. 

Adventures of Herr Baby 

Carrots 

Children of the Castle M73Ch i 

Girls and I 

T.lttle Miss Peggy M73L 

Palace in Garden M73P 

Rectory Children M73IJ 

Montgomery, D. H. 

Heroic Ballads 

History of the Ignited States 

Two Great Retreats 

Mulholland, Rosa. 

Gianetta M899G 

Hetty Gray MSO^Ho 

Munroe, Kirk. 

Canipmates M923C 

Derrick Stirling M9*23D 

Doryniates M923Dc) 

Flamingo Feather M923F 

l*rince Dusty 

Murfree, M. N. 

Down the lUvine M942D 

In the Tennessee Mountains M942ln 



LIST OF BOOKS. 14H 

Murray, W. II. 11. 

Adventures in the Wilderness 

Niciiols, G. VV. 

Story of Great March S.KJ4.7 

Noi*dhoff, Charles. 

Man-of-War Life 

Northern California 10822 

Politics for Youn^ Americans 8G5G 

Whaling and Fishing 

Norton, F. II. 

Alex. II. Stevens 

Oliphant, M. O. W. 

Agnes Ho|>etouu*s Schools and Holidays 01 33An 

l*aez, I*. 

Wild Scenes in South America 10S51 

rage, T. N. 

Among Camps TUlAm 

Two Little Confederates P14I r 

Terry, Nora. 

Another Flock of Girls 1*425 An 

Hosebud Garden of Girls P425K 

i»helps, E. S. 

Gypsey Series. 4 vols. 
Plutarch. 

Lives. Abridged 

Plympton, A. G. 

Dear Daughter Dorotiiy P748D 

l*ollard, Josephine. 

Bostoji Tea Party 

Porter, Jane. 

Scottish Chiefs 1*833S 

Proctor, R. A. 

Half Hours with the Stars (>01)5 

Half Hours witii the Telescope 15635 

Pratt, Mara L. 

Fairyland of Flowers 

Pyle, Howard. 

Men of Iron l*091Me 

Merry Adventures 1*991 M 

Otto of Silver Hand P9910 

Wonder Clock 1*991 Wo 

Kcclus, Onesime. 

Birdseye View of the World 9101124 

Kcid, Mayne. 

AHoat in the Forest Ji272A 



144 LIST OF BOOKS. 

Young Yagers B272Y(» 

Richards, L. E. 

Captain January R393C' 

Five Mice 

Joyous Story of Toto R3!)2.l 

TotoVs Merry Winter imiV 

Kichardson, A. 8. 

History of Our Country S144."4 

Stories from Old English Poetry 

Ricketson, Daniel. 

History of New Bedford 97 

Rideing, W. H. 

Boys, Coastwise 

Itolfe, W. J. 

Oliver Goldsmith 

Poems for Children 

Tales of Chivalry 

Tennyson for the Young 

Ruskin, John. 

King of Golden River 633- 

Russell, W.C. 

Master Rockafeller's Voyage 

Ryder, A. H. 

Hold Up Your Head, Girls 

Sain tine, X. 

Pieoiola Sa23l* 

Samuels, Samuel. 

From Forecastle to Cabin ♦ 

Schwatka, Fred. 

Children of the Cold 

Scott, Sir Walter. 

Guy Mannering. Abridged ♦ 

Ivjinhoe $cc>$21. See title list. 

Mnrmion • 

Tales of a Grandfather ♦ 

'l\ilisman Sco82T 

Scudder, H. E. 

Bodley Books. Series 

Boston Town 

Washington, Life of 

SewalU Anna. 

Black Beauty Se84 

Sewall, M. E. 

Little Jarvis 

Midshipman Pauldhig 



LIST OF BOOKS. 14/) 

Shakespeare, W. 

Hamlet 

Julias Caesar 

Shaw, F. F.. 

Castle Blair Sh23C 

Sidney, Margaret. 

Little Peppers SlllFi 

How They Went to Europe 

OurTowu SlllO 

Rob SlllKo 

.St. George and the Dragon SI US 

8iiiionds, W. 

Ainiwell Stories 

Sloane, T. O'C. 

Electrical Toymaking 637.8S16 

Smith. Mrs. L. T. 

Daddy's Boy . . 

Deb and the Duchess 

Tip Cat 

^Sllliles, Samuel. 

Self Help 374Sm4 

^-^nlucker, S. M. 

Alexander Hamilton 

fcSpyri, Joanna. 

Heidi Sp97H 

Red Letter Stories 

Swiss Stories Sp97S 

^Stanley, H. M. 

How I Found Livingstone 2296 

My Kalulu St22M 

^^tephen8, C. A. 

Knockabout Club t 

SStevenson, R. L. 

Kidnapped St49K 

Treasure Island SU9T 

Stoddard, Wm. O. 

Lives of the Presidents * 

^Stockton, Frank R. 

Boys' Library of Pluck and Action 

Jolly Fellowship Sl(U 

Personally Conducted 914St6 

Roundabout liambles 

Rudder Grange St6R 

b>towe, H. B. 

May Flower 



146 



LIST OF BOOKS. 



11155 
11160 



Uncle Tom's Cabin St77r 

Swift, Jonatlian. 

Gulliver's Travels * 

Symington, A. J. 

Hints to Boys 

Thackeray, W. M. 

Roundabout Papers 12439 

Thayer, W. M. 

Bobbin Boy 

Marvels of New West 9l78r33 

Pioneer Boy 10631 

Printer Boy 10077 

Youths' History of the Rebellion 9773 

Thompson, D. P. 

Green Mountain Hoys 'i'STGr 

Thompson, Maurice. 

Boys' Book of Sports . . . .' 

Towle, G. M. 

De Gama 

Drake 

Raleigh 

Townsend, E. D. 

Anecdotes of the Civil War in United States 

Townsend, Virginia. 

Only Girls 

That Queer Girl T663T 

Trafton, Adeline. 

How We Went to Europe 

Trowbridge, John. 

'I'hree Boys in Electrical Boat T756T ♦ 

Trowbridge, J. T. 

Biding His Time T7oGBi 

Cudjo's Cave T756Cu 

His One Fault 

,Iack Hazzard 

Peter Budstone 

Tide Mill Stories 

Three Scouts 

Verne, .Jules. 

Dick Sands 

From P^arth to Moon 

(iroat Voyages, Discoveries, Navigators. 3 vols . . . 

Twenty Thousand Leagues 

Wallace, Lew. 

Ben Hur 



T756HO 

1756Pe 

* 

T756'i- 



V59D 

V59FS 

107G1 

Vo9'l\v 

W154B 



LIST or BOOKS. 



147 



'jitertoii, Charles. 

Wandering In South Aincriea S37.2.'{ 

•eld, II. G. 

Franklin 

ellrs, D. A. 
Science of Common Things ♦ 

^hitney, Mrs. A. D. T. 

(-'hetiuasset Boys WOlBo 

Other Girls WGlOt 

Keal Folks VV611i 

We Girls . . . ' WGIW 

'hittier. J. G. 

Child T.ife in l*oetry 127(h5 

Child I.ife in I'rose 12764 

Poems siiweri 

'iggin, K. D. 

Birds* Christmas Carol WG:{7B 

'ilkins, M. F. 

IJttle Lucretia ♦ 

I'ot of Gold W(>5:>P 

'illiams, G. F. 

Bullet and Shell 

•irt, William. 

I'atrick Henry 702 

'oolsey. T. C. 

Eyebright W8S2F 

'ood, J. G. 

Bible Animals S214.ir) 

Common Objects by the Seashore 07:^1 

Common Objects of the Country G7:{0 

Common Objects of the Microsco|)(5 ()727 

Fresh and Salt Water Aquarium Sl)r).17 

Insects Abroad S215.14 

Insects at Home S222.ir> 

Natural History 0748 

Strange Dwellings SoGo.l 

.right, H. C. 

Child's Stories in American Histnrv 

Children's Stories in English Literature ...... * 

Stories of American Progress 

onge, Charlotte. 

Child's History of France 5)48G 

(•hild'sHistory of England 1)485 

Child's History of Germany 9484 

Child's History of Greece 9483 

Child^s History of Home 9487 

Golden Deeds 



148 LIST OF BOOKS. 

Books of Reference on North Side of Reading Room. 

Appleton's Aiuerican Biography 

Appletoifs Encyclopedia 

Atlas, Bradley's 

Atlas of Massachusetts 

Bartlett's Quotations 

Dictionaries. Century, Worcester, Wehster 

History, Cyclopedia of. B. J. Lossing 

History, Hand Book. Brewer 

Lippincott*s Biographical Dictionary 

Lippincott's Gazetteer 

One of a Thousand. Mass. Biography 

Statesmen's Year Book 

r. S. Postal Guide. (Places.) 

Young People's Cyclopedia of Persons and Places .... 



w 



ANNUAL REPORT 



r 



* OF TIIK 

i. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



f OK TIIK 

[ 

r 

CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, 



TOIiKTllKll Wnil TIIK 



^ Superintendent's Annual Report, 



B, FOR THE YEAR 1895 

^ 



NEW HEDKOKI): 

MBRCUKY l'UBLI8IIIN<i CdMPANT, CITY l'KINTEK8. 

1S9(>. 






In School Committee, 

January 2, 1896. 

Volcd^ That the Secretary prepare the Annual Report 
of the School Board for the year I^^95, and that 1,500 
copies of the same be printed. 



Report of the Secretary. 



By direction of the School Committee, I submit to our 
fellow citizens the following report for the year 1895 : 

STATISTICS. 



I. POPULATION AND VALUATION 

The populatiou of the city (ceusus of 1880) was 
The population of the city (census of 1890) was 
The population of the city (census of 1895) was 
Valuation of taxable property (1895) was 

II. SCHOOL CENSUS. 



26,875 

40,705 

55,251 

$52,642,73:) 



School census, May, 1894 (children between five and fifteen 
years of age), {T,6G5 

School census, May, 1895 (children between Ave and fifteen 
years of age), 10,076 

Increase during the year (children between five and fifteen 
ytiars of age), 411 



SCHOOL OKNSU.S BY WARDS. 



Warii Oue, 
Ward Two, 
Ward Three, 
Ward Four, 
Ward Five, 
Ward Six, 



1894. 


1895. 




:j,4-28 


:«,645 


217 increase 


727 


7M 


10 increase. 


72(1 


742 


16 increase 


509 


503 


6 decrease 


849 


8:« 


11 decreastv 


:J,42G 


3,611 


195 increase 



9,G(»5 



10,076 



4 SCH<X)L REPORT. 

LOCATION' OF OIIILDRKN BKTWKKN FIVK AND FIFTEEN YEARS OF AGE 

AS KEPORTEI) BV THE CENSUS OFFICERS. 





Attending; 
ruhllc Schools. 


Attending Parochial 
or Prlvabe Schools. 


AtteDdiuff 
no Sdiool. 


Ward One, 


1 ,488 






1,548 




064 


Ward Two, 


I8(i 






158 




98 


Ward Thrt^o, 


595 






78 




74 


Ward Four, 


422 






28 




53 


Ward Five, 


598 






172 




78 


Ward Six, 


2,812 






719 




580 



5,841 2,698 1,542 

REMARKS UPON POPULATION AND SCHOOL CENSUS. 

The census reports show that the population of the city 
has increased over lOO per cent, during the past fifteen years, 
and 35 and a fraction per cent, during the past five years. 
The school population has increased in a still greater ra- 
tio. This increase has been provided for partly by the 
public schools, partly by the parochial schools, all of the 
latter having been opened during this period. 

The school census reports for 1895 show an increase of 
411 children between the ages of five and fifteen from May 
1894 to May 1895. This is 212 more than the increase 
from May 1893 to May 1894, which, owing to the great 
business depression for that time, was less than for some 
years. Since May, 1895, I have good reasons for believ- 
ing that the increase has been greater even than for the 
corresponding months of the year next preceding. 

The reports show also that there were many more chil- 
dren between the ages of five and fifteen who were not at- 
tending any school at the time the census was taken than 
was shown by the reports of the previous year. This was 
wholly due I think to the great business depression in the 
mill industry during the year 1893-4. The schools in an 
industrial city of this character feel the business pulse very 
quickly. A shutting down of the mills or a reduction in 



SCIICX)L RKPORT. < 

product is usually followed by a temporary increase in the 
school attendance ; but a revival of business is followed by 
a withdrawal, not only of those who have temporarily re- 
turned, but of others who may help to swell the revenues 
of the family, the head of which is often in debt from pre- 
vious loss of work. 

A school census is valuable inasmuch as it furnishes 
data necessary for the State report, and gives data also 
for estimating the school accommodations which will be 
needed in the immediate future. 

ni. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION. 

High, 1 

Training school for toachors, 1 

Grammar, 5 

Primary, 12 

Country, 4 

Mill, * 2 

IV. SCIIOOI. BUILDIXfiS. 
Occiipioii hy the scliool.«, 21 

U<X)MS rSKI) van siCIIOOL PURPOSKS (l)AV .SCHOOLS), INCLIDINCJ 

IIAI.LS AND KKCITATION ROOMS. 

High, 17 

Training. <) 

Grammar, 4'} 

Primary, SO 

Mill, ' 4 

Country, 9 

Manual training. 2 

Uoom(« unoccupied, 4 

Total, 170 

Room» used for hoth day and evening schools, 30 

Rooms used for evening drawing school, 3 



SCHOOL REPORT. 





V. 


SEATS. 






Seats occupied. 


Seats unoccupied 


High school, 




329 


47 


Grammar schooU, 




1,765 


183 


Primary schools. 




3,547 


346 


TraiDiD|2: school. 




349 


24 


Mill schools. 




173 


3 


Country schools. 




213 


87 



Total, 



6,376 



690 



VI. TEACHERS. 



Whole number in service Dec. 20, 1895 : 

High school. 

Training school, 8 regular, 9 pupil teachers, 

Grammar schools, 

Primary schools. 

Country schools. 

Mill schools. 

Special teachers. 

Temporary assistants, 

Evening schools, 

Total, 



13 

17 

42 

85 

6 

4 

i 

3 

242 



Vll. PUPILS. 



DAY SCHOOLS, 1895. 

AVhole number of pupils enrolled of all ages, 

Average number of pupils belonging, 

Average daily attendance, 

Per cent, of attendance, 

Number of half-days absence, 

Xumber cases of tardiness, 

Number cases of dit missal, 

Number cases of truancy reported by teaehors, 

Number cases of corporal punishment, 

Number cases of suspension, 

Half days absence of teachers, 

Number cases of tardiness by teachers. 

Number visits made the schools by the Superintendent, 

Number visits made the schools by the School Committee, 

Number visits made the schools by parents and others, 



7,860 

6,004.9 

5,542.4 

92.3 

179,164 

16,003 

38,184 

'295 

1,029 

I 

1,497 

188 

.582 

922 

2,91M5 



SCHOOL REPORT. 7 

EVENING SCHOOLS, 1895. 

Whole number pupil» eurolled, 2,725 

Average number belonging, 1,069.3 

Average nightly attendance. 849.6 

Per cent, of attendance, 79.4 

Total nights absence, 8,686 

Number of cases tardiness, 524 

Number visits by Superintendent, 7 

Number visits by School Committee, 144 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL, 1895. 

Whole number pupils enrolled, 153 
Average number belonging, 73.2 

Average nightly attendance, 58.2 

Per cent, of attendance, 78.9 

Number visits made by the Superintendent, 4 

Number visits made by School Committee, — 

COST OF INSTRUCTION PER SCHOLAR BY SCHOOLS. 

In this connection the cost of instruction per scholar is 
based upon the average number belonging to each school 
during the year, and the amount expended for hire of 
teachers, fuel, care of school houses, books and supplies 
(except those furnished from the income of the Sylvia 
Ann Howland fund), the term **care of school houses" 
including only the salaries of janitors. 

Elsewhere in the report is given the cost, by depart- 
ments, of each pupil, based on the average number be- 
longing and the total amount expended for the mainte- 
nance of each department during the year. This last 
computation furnishes the basis upon which tuition of non- 
residents will be collected. 

Table I. This table is computed, as in former Reports, 
on the items classified above. 

The cost of maintenance of each pupil iu the Hiffh school 
for the year has been 658.29 



8 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Grainuiar (iepartnient : 

Fifth Street, 2o.0(; 

Middle Street, *^<*- 

Parker Street, '^-'-^ 

'Oiompson Street, -*^**^ 

Odar G ro vo Street , J--^^ 

Harrington Training, '^^'*'^ 

Primary department : 

Harrington Training, -*-^-"^ 

Acughnet Avenue, \7.\i 

I. W. Benjamin, 16-73 

Cedar Street, '^-^^ 

Cedar Grove Street, 17.15 

Cannon ville, 22.74 

Dartmouth Street, ^^-^^ 

Thomas A. Greene, 20.2l> 

Sylvia Ann Howland, *^*^-12 

Linden Street, 1<>-"*^ 

Merrimac Street, 2^1^ 

Maxfleld Street, 2^-01 

Thompson Street, 17.40 

Ungraded schools: 

Acushuet, 35.5 < 

Clark's Point, '^^'^' 

North, *^^-«; 

Rockdale, 34.53 

North Mill, '^--^^ 

South Mill, 21-6- 

Evening schools : 

Cedar (irove Street, ■^•^"> 

Fifth Street, ^-56 

Merrimac Street, **-^*^ 

Parker Street, ^-1^ 

Thompson Street, ^'^^ 

Evening Drawing, U,3i 

'Vhv !iv«?rage cost of a 

Grammar school pupil was 26.46 

F'rimary school pupil was 18.98 



SCHOOL REPORT. 9 

Uiignulcd school pupil was 9;{1.U4 

Mill school pupil was, 26.17 

Bllemoutary evening school pupil was 4.85 

Evening drawing school pupil was 11.32 

The average cost of a day school pupil was '£i.S'2 



*tx 



Table II. The average cost per pupil by departments, 
based on the average number belonging and the total ex- 
penditures for each department, was as follows : — 

High school, 04.26 
Grammar schools, 27.50 
Primary schools, 20.32 
Ungraded schools, 35.31 
Kvening elementary schools, 4.85 
Evening drawing school, 11.32 
Average cost of a day school i)upil, 25.39 
Average cost of an evening school pupil, including draw- 
ing school, .53 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR 1895. 

General and special appropriations as follows : 

For teachers' salaries, $108,800.00 
Incidentals (including salaries of otiiceis and janitors, 

books, supplies, etc.), 40,300.00 

Repairs of buildings, 10,500.00 

Balance of manual training school appropriation, 235.40 



$159,835.46 
EXPENDITURES. 

F(»r teachers' salaries : 

Day schools, $104,239.51 

Evening schools, 4,215.50 $108,455.01 

For incidentals : 

Salaries of otHcers, including truant otticers and mes- 
senger, 5,711.40 
Salaries of janitors, day and evening schools, 11,906.60 
Books and supplies, 5,639.77 

2 



lO SCHOOL REPORT. 

Heating apparatus, 62,252^ 
Lighting schools, 1,004.30 
Fuel for schools, 7,139.67 
Cooking school, 181.12 
Manual training scliool, 280.87 
Miscellaneous, (including rent of school committee rooms 
and other rooms used for school purposes, janitor sup- 
plies, school furniture, etc.), 7,876.23 
For repairs of buildings, 9,377.87 







$159,825.30 


Summary : 






Receipts, 


$159,835.46 




Expenditures, 


159,825.30 




Balance, 


$10.16 




DOG FUND. 






Balance, Jan. 1, 1895, 


93,632.20 




Received, Feb., 1895, 


1,220.93 


$4,853.13 


Expenditures for 1895, 




1,130.25 




$3,722.88 


Received from non-resident pupils. 




$759.i>r> 


Received from sale of books and supplies. 




13.00 



$772.55 

The amount asked for at the beginning of the year by 
the School Department was $154,500; the amount ex- 
pended was $159,825.30. The difference of $5*325.30 
was granted in special appropriations by the City Council. 

This large increase over the amount requested should, 
perhaps, be explained. $3,700 was expended in extra- 
ordinary repairs and renewals of heating apparatus. 
$1,500 of it was expended on the heating apparatus of the 
I. W. 'Benjamin school. The heating apparatus in this 
building was far from adequate when it was turned over to 
the School Committee. A small additional boiler was put 
in the first winter that the building was occupied, part of 
the expense for which was paid for by the heating con- 
tractor, part by the city ; but the building was not then 



SCHOOL REPORT. II 

heated. Even now with the large additional facilities, it 
is difficult to keep all the rooms at a proper temperature 
in extreme weather. The fault lies in the original plan. 
And it is too often the case that the School Department is 
compelled to supplement the heating apparatus of a school 
building soon after it is delivered to it. The other large 
items for heating were for renewals of boiler in Cedar 
Street and furnaces in Maxfield Street school houses. 
The balance of the exceeded appropriation was spent 
chiefly in rent for buildings hired for school purposes and 
in fitting and furnishing them. School houses are not 

Jbuilt fast enough to accommodate the growing school pop- 
ulation. This temporary renting of buildings for school 

purposes is not economical, nor are the pupils properly 

provided for when the best possible arrangement is made 

by the School Department. 

SYLVIA ANN ROWLAND EDUCATIONAL FUND. 

Salance of income on hand, Jan. 1, 1895, $17.00 

Interest for the year, 3,000.00 

lieceived from sale of supplies, 17.68 



^,034.68 
expenditures for the year, 2,783.37 

Balance Jan. 1, 189G, $251.31 

Cost of books and supplies during 1895, $2,783.37 

Cost of books and supplies in stock Jan. 1, 1895, 265.94 



$3,049.31 



Cost of books and supplies charged to schools, 1895, $2,840.55 

Cost of books and supplies in stock Jan. 1, 1896, 190.90 

Cash receipts from sale of supplies, 17.86 

$3,049.31 

Disbursements to the several schools, and otherwise, 
are as follows : — 



12 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



High school, 

Fifth Street Grammar school, 

Middle Street Grammar school, 

Parker Street Grammar school, 

Thompson Street school, 

Harrington Training school, 

Acushnet Avenue Primary school, 

I. W. Benjamin Primary school, 

Cedar Grove Street school. 

Cedar Street Primary school, 

Cannonville Primary school, 

Dartmouth Street Primary school, 

Thomas A. Greene Primary school, 

S. A. How land Primary school, 

Linden Street Primary school, 

Merrimac Street Primary school, 

Maxfield Street Primary sehooK 

Acushnet school, 

Clark's Point school. 

North school, 

Plainville school, 

Rockdale school, 

North Mill school. 

South Mill school. 

Hacienda building. 

Office, 

Care of muf^ical instruments, 

Express and freight. 

Pedagogical library, 

Covering books, 

Miscellaneous supplies, 

C:ash sales, 

Stock on liand Jan. 1, 1890, 



DETAILED STATEMENT. 



#336.25 

133.36 

187.25 

286.76 

135.80 

228.26 

103.01 

128.54 

236.50 

52.07 

24.38 

71.12 

94.8tf 

39.68 

52.73 

79.66 

21.77 

34.10 

26.04 

80.68 

1.56 

13.90 

39.21 

4.82 

.75 

.75 

351.00 

12.68 

12.38 

6.65 

44.06 

17.68 

190.90 

$3,049.31 



Outlay by the School Committee from the income of the 
Sylvia Ann Hovvland fund, from Jan. i, 1895, to Jan. i, 

1896 :— 



BOOKS ANI> PKKIOIK^ALS. 



AuHM-ican Rook Co., 
Alpha Piihlishint? ('(k, 
Boston School Supply Co., 



•57.53 

.80 

78.02 



SCHOOL REPORT. I3 

:entury Co., $25.00 

r, T. H. A Co., 7.87 

, Mead &Co., 99.00 

Ational Publishing Co., 70.15 

& Co., 168.20 

htoii, Mifflin «t Co., 128.41 

1, D. C. & Co., 48.04 

linson, II. 8. & Co., 59.95 

1, William E., 8.50 

er & Bros., 8.3«3 

., Harry C, 2.00 

ler, C. A. & Co., 16.85 

; Shepanl, 12.07 

I, Shewell it Sanborn, 28.22 

aiau, Gi*een & Co., 7.07 
Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 1.00 

Q, Perry & Co., 157.80 

ee, Emma A. 1.34 

ard, Merrill <& (o., 27.00 

lillan & Co., 3.07 

)l8, C. A. Co., 30.00 

im'8 Sons, G. P. 1.85 

r, .John E. & Co., 10.84 

X Educational Co., .93 

ill Publishing Co., 1.60 

•, Burdett & Co., 62.67 

lers, (;harles & Sons, 21.93 

, Robert W. 1W.40 

•rsity Publishing Co., 32.29 

. Wm. A Co., 7.60 $1,353.03 

I>KI>A(i<)(;iCAL LIBKARY. 

lean Book < 'o., $ .90 

jen, ('. \V., 1.51 

& ( o., 2.08 

5g, E. L. &Vi}., 2.34 

lers. Sons, Charles 4.80 $11.6:j 

MIMC DKPAKTMKNT. 

t& (Company, 8.S80.55 

I'Mi, .lohn C. & Co., 13.50 

I, D. C. &Co., 16.34 

!, George 418.00 $828.39 



14 SCHOOL REPORT. 

BINDING AND COVERING BOOKS. 

Briggs & I^wrence, 9 .30 

Collins, Willlston H. & Co., 44.97 

Gibbs, Elizabeth H. 4.65 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co., 117.76 

Hatch, William K. 2.00 $169.68 

PUIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Briggs & T^awrence, 9 .50 

Dennison Manufacturing Co.« 29.40 

Perry, George S. A Co., 91 .68 $15^ ^ 

APPARATUS. 

Almy, .fames T. estate of #5.00 

Bliss A Nye, .25 

Elmer A Amend, 46.72 

Hut<;hin8on, H. 8. A Co., 1.50 

Library Bureau, 1.50 

Nuttall, James IL 1.10 

Perry, Frank B. 15.00 

Ritchie, E. 8. A Sons, 19.10 

Sherman, C. R. A Son, 2.50 

Smith, Carleton Iron Co., 16.85 

Stanley, N. A. .50 ^llOT 

EXPRESS AND FREIGHT. 

Gray, Charles A. f2.58 

Hatch A Co., 4.35 

.Jennings, William A. 5.75 #12. ^ 

MISCELLANEOrS. 

Allen, Asa L. H. #7.50 

Boston School Supply Co., 23.00 

Cuproni, P. P. A Bro., 11.00 

Crowell, Miss E. N. 17.95 

Heath, 1). C. A Co., 14.92 

Ilainmett, .1. L. 34.00 

Hutchinson, II. S. A Co., 1.00 

Ilillinjin, Washburn A Co., 2.12 

Mercury Publishing Co., .97 

McAllister, T. II. 11.60 

Nuttall,. lames II. .90 

Taber, Charles A Co., 16.40 

Western Publishing House, :«.00 #176.3< 



SCHOOL REPORT. I5 

TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

STATEMENT. 

Cost of l>ook4 and supplies purchased duriu^ 1895, $5,039.77 

Cost of books and supplies in stock Jan. 1, 1S95, 1,049.68 

$6,(J89.45 

Cost of books and supplies charged to schools in 1895, $4,898.13 

Cost of books and supplies in stock Jan. 1, 1896, 1,778.32 

Cash receipts from the sale of books and supplies, 13.00 

$6,689.45 

The cost in detail of books and supplies furnished the 
several schools for the year 1895 is as follows : — 



High school, 

Fifth Street Grammar school, 
Middle Street Orammar school, 
Parker Street Grammar school, 
Thompson Street (irammar school. 
Cedar Grove Street (grammar school, 
Acushnet Avenue Primary school. 
I. W. Benjamin Primary school, 
Cedar Street Primary school, 
CVdar Grove Street Primary school, 
Oannonvillc Primary school, 
Dartmouth Street Primary school, 
Tliomas A. Greene Primary school, 
S. A. llowland Primary school. 
Lintlen Street Primary school, 
Merrimac Street Primary school, 
Maxfleld Street Primary school, 
Harrington Training school. 
North Mill school. 
South Mill school, 
Acushnet school, 
Clark's Point school, 
Xorth school, 
Plainville school, 
Rockdale school. 



Suppllen. 


Bookti. 


ToUl. 


$610.01 


$477.03 


$1,087.04 


251.51 


166.26 


417.77 


244.98 


210.37 


455.35 


263.52 


311.17 


574.69 


196.09 


123.69 


319.78 


21I.07 


22.13 


51.20 


94.93 


(«.69 


160.62 


118.54 


76.51 


195.05 


75.48 


20. -25 


95.73 


191.51 


130.66 


322.17 


28.40 


8.31 


36.71 


80.30 


01.74 


142.04 


75.49 


33.26 


108.75 


52.2S 


26.20 


78.48 


57.21> 


.33.80 


91.18 


56.48 


48.47 


104.95 


:w.i9 


17.47 


51.66 


142.23 


84.66 


226.89 


14.45 


25.41 


39.86 


6.32 


19.35 


25.67 


22.49 


26.54 


49.03 


13.85 


20.32 


34.17 


19.47 


22.06 


41.53 


.09 


2.99 


3.68 


11.35 


5.02 


16.37 



I 6 SCHOOL REPORT. 



Cedar Grove Street Evening school, 
Parker Street Evening school, 

Fifth Street Evening school, 

Mcrrimac Street Evening school, 

Thompson Street Evening school, 

Evening Drawing school. 



Supplies. 


UuokH. 


ToUl. 


$2M 




92.10 


.14 


$11). 12 


19.26 


4.3(} 


3.70 


8.12 


4.22 


8.47 


12.09 


7.85 


31.49 


;«.34 


86.19 




80.19 



$2,795.84 92,102.29 $4,898.13 



The average cost per pupil in the different departments 
of the schools, for books and supplies, has been as fol- 
lows : — 

High school, $3.37 

Grammar schools, 1.11 

Primary schools, .37 

Country schools, .77 

Mill schools, .50 
Average for day schools. 



.iO 



Average for evening schools, .(W 

Average for evening drawing school, 1.18 

THE INCREASING COST OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The schools cost $0.02 per pupil less than for the year 
1894. This decrease was entirely in the primary depart^ 
ment, for the High, grammar, and country schools cost 
more per pupil. This means an average of more pupils 
in these grades to a teacher, and was a saving where it 
was least desirable. But reviewing the cost of the schools 
during the past decade it will be seen that they have 
increased considerably in the cost per pupil, and it may 
be well to show why this is so, and whether the increased 
expenditure is justified. 

The reason why the schools are costing more than they 
did per pupil ten years ago, may be summarized in a nut- 
shell ; they are providing better for the welfare of the 
pupils both physically and mentally, and are giving them 
special advantages not offered them then. One has but 



SCHCXDL REPORT. 1 7 

to recall many of the school houses in the city ten years 
ago, and compare them with the present quarters of the 
children of those districts to realize the change for the 
better ; but these modern school houses with their bet- 
ter heating, lighting and ventilating facilities cost much 
more to run and care for than did the old. 

Again, better salaries are paid the teachers than were 
paid ten years ago ; an increase has been made in every 
department, and the good teacher is insufficiently paid 
now in most cases. Better trained teachers, furnished 
principally by our Normal and Training school, are now 
provided for the schools as vacancies exist. The schools 
are not permitted to be crowded as they were in the past to 
the detriment of the pupils both physically and mentally ; this 
means more school rooms, more teachers, more expendi- 
ture in several other directions. But what citizen would 
not say that forty or fifty pupils were enough lor any one 
teacher to control and instruct ; either number is too 
many. Formerly it was not unusual to find sixty or sev- 
enty in charge of a teacher, and housed in miserably ven- 
tilated rooms. 

These are some of the reasons why the schools not only 
of New Bedford, but of all our cities and towns are cost- 
ing more to-day than they did some years ago. It is as 
reasonable for one to say that private enterprise should 
not build buildings in the city like the Merchants' Bank 
building, and the Masonic building, and the Standard 
building, as to say that the city should not build the 
school houses of the present, because those of the old 
type were good enough for the past generations and 
should be good enough for this. It would be as reason- 
able to say that commerce and manufactures should be 
carried on in the same manner as was done years ago as 
to say that the schools should be administered in the same 
way as they were years ago. "l*he luxuries of the past 

3 



i8 



SCHCXDL REPORT. 



are the necessities of the present." I know not who said 
this, but it is true. Modern life is expensive ; so is the 
modern school ; but modern life offers more to every man 
and woman than the old ; so does the modern school offer 
more to every pupil. 

Comparisons are sometimes valuable, and to show that 
our schools are not costing an excessive amount when 
compared with the cost in a number of progressive cities 
throughout the country of about our population, a few 
larger and a few smaller, I submit a table which was 
compiled by the Superintendent of schools of Utica, N. 
Y., and was based on the expenditures in those schools 
for the year 1894. 

COMPARATIVE COST OF SCHOOLS. 



CoMt per pupil per year, based ou averaire 
dally attendance. 
For Hopervislon For all expeiit^es 





and teaching. 


except new onlldlngs 


D«s Moines, Iowa, 


$24.17 


$35.99 


Portland, Oregon, 


24.47 


30.03 


Worcester, Mass., 


19.79 


28.34 


Troy, N. Y., 


23.90 


29.17 


Albany, N. Y., 


18.00 


23.93 


Springfield, Mass., 


24^6 


39.13 


Bridgeport, Conn., 


14.90 


21.52 


New Haven, Tonn., 


22.19 


31.25 


Newburgh, N.-V., 


1S.77 


29.11 


SyracUvSe, N. Y., 


14.88 


23.17 


Rochester, N. V., 


19.04 


26.71 


Lowell, Mass., 


23.11 


•29.27 


Dulutb, Minn., 


20.54 


36.58 


Yonkers, N. V., 


22.21 


44.88 


Hartford, Conn., 


2(>..58 
$21.15 


38.68 


Average for fifteen cities. 


$31.18 


New Bedford, 


19.83 


27.51 



It is not to be e.xpected that the schools will cost less 
each year. They are likely to cost more, pro rata, for 
some years yet. There must be a limit of course ; but 



SCHOOL REPORT. I9 

that has not yet been reached. And it is one of the most 
hopeful signs of the times, that the people want good 
schools, and, when it comes to the test, are willing to pay 
for them. 

PRESENT SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS AND 

NEEDS. 

Seven classes comprising over 300 pupils are now 
housed in rented buildings. Six of these are in the north 
part of the city, and one in the south part. It will be nec- 
essary to place several other classes in the south part in 
rented quarters before relief can be provided by the City 
Government in that district even with prompt action. 
Two eight-room buildings are now in process of construc- 
tion, which, when completed, will provide ample accom- 
modation for the present surplus of pupils in the north 
section of the city, and also provide for some future in- 
crease. One of these buildings is situated on Clark street, 
between Myrtle and Reynolds street. This building is 
roofed in and may be ready for occupancy by May, but 
may not be ready before September. The other is located 
on the corner of Bowditch street and Phillips avenue. 
The foundation of this is in, and it is hoped that this also 
may be ready for occupancy by September. 

The Committee on City Property has recommended the 
purchase of a lot on Dartmouth street between Dunbar 
lane and contemplated street, upon which to erect a pri- 
mary building. The matter is now before the City Coun- 
cil, and it is to be hoped that that body will act promptly 
in purchasing it and erecting a suitable building thereon. 
The lot meets the approval of the School Committee, 
and is a most desirable one. The school accommodations 
in other parts of the city are now adequate to the needs of 
the department in most cases. It will be necessary to 



20 SCHOOL. REPORT. 

finish a room in the third story of the Silvia Ann How- 
land school to accommodate the overflow of pupils in the 
first grade, which occurs regularly at the beginning of the 
winter term. The City Council has already been re- 
quested to grant an appropriation for that purpose. Last 
year the overflow was assigned to the disused William 
Street school. But many parents objected strenuously' to 
sending their children there, and a number did not. 

The rapid growth of the city taxes the School Depart- 
ment to provide each year for the yearly increase in the 
number of pupils. Only prompt action on the part of 
each City Council will enable the Department to provide 
such school accommodations as each pupil who is of 
school age is entitled. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HATCH, 

Secretarv. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 21 

NEW BEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATING 

EXERCISES 

HBLD IX THE OPEKA HOUSE 

■ 

June 28, 1895. 

OPERATIC SELECTION, "Paul Jones/' Moses 

Orchestra. 

PRAYER, 

By the Rev. Edmund S. Rou9Manierk. 

SALUTATORY AND ESSAY, "Success.'' 

Maud Metcalf. 

SONG, "Battle On,'' Arr.from *''Joan of Arc,"' by Irving Emerson 

Chorus. 

ORATION, "The Value of Education." 

Charles Austin Bonnet, Jr.* 

CORNET SOLO, "Leonore." Trotere 

Mr. Charles Matthews. 

ESSAY, "The Heir of all the Ages." 

Jessie Belle Flagg.* * 

SONG, "Anchored." Arr./rom M, Watson by O. A, Veazi^ 

THIRD BOURNE PRIZE ESSAY, "Patriotism." 

Harrison Everett AsHLEY.f 

CONCERT WALTZ, "Toreador." Royle 

Orchestra. 

FIRST BOURNE PRIZE ESSAY, "The Old Fashioned Things of 
Earth." 

Lucy Sherman Cushing. 

SONG, "Soldiers' Chorus." Gounod's ^^ Faust,'''' arr. by Irving Emerson 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS, WITH ADDRESS 

By His Honor Mayor Parker. 



*The (UauB elect the ClasH Orator aud the Cla88 Esoaylbt. 

tin Mr. Ashley's absence on account of College Examinations his essay was given 
by Nelson Allen Wood. 



22 SCHOOL REPORT. 

#^T A QG an-Mr- / Words bv Maudb Worth Allen. 

ci.ASb »UJNl,. \ Music by Helen Louise Hatch. 

Summer skies and sweetest flowers 

Will not ever smile and bloom ; 
Birds not always sing their clearest, 

Winds not always waft perfume. 

Chorus, 

Through our trials we shall triumph ; 
We shall gain the long sought goal, 
Find there glory yet more glorious, 
Since 'twas won with steadfast soul. 

So when skies begin to lower. 

Flowers fade, and soft winds fly. 
We will press more bravely onward. 

Ever strive for triumph high. 

Though our fate may seem against us. 
Friends grow cold and foes increase, 

Yet with help of God we'll conquer, 
God will give his children peace. 

When at last our struggle's over, 

When for us the conflict's done, 
Sweeter far will be our glory 

Slncxe through trials it was won. 

SECOND BOURXE PRIZE ESSAY AND VALEDICTORY, "Aladdin's 
Lamp— If I liad it." 

Harriet Shaw Ashley. 

MARCH, "Honeymoon," Rost'y 

Orchestra. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



23 



GRADUATES, CLASS OF '95 



• 4 1>. 



Per Auyusta ad Auyusta. 



Harrison Everett A«hley, 
Charles Austin Bonuey, Jr., 
Harold Sanford Bowie, 
William Sanders Bradford, 
William Henry Chase, 
Kichmond Gordon, 
Benjamin Franklin Haines, 
Joseph Buckminster Holmes, 
Frank Warren Knowlton, 
l^alph Wilder Nesbitt, 
Walter Hale Paige, 
-lohu William Riley, 
l«>ank Kverett Washburn, 
-.Albert Roseoe White, 
Albert Tisdale Wilde, 
kelson Allen Wood, 

Elizabeth May Allen, 

Alaude Worth Allen, 

^Florence Morgan Anthony, 

Harriet Shaw Ashley, 

Ada Swasey Blake, 

ICdith Gardner Bliss, 

Florence Ellen Bliss, 

Mabel Mitchell Bliss, 

£stel]e Clinton Bolles, 
Charlotte Belle Brightman, 
Dawn Hamilton Brownell, 
Mary Prescott Brownell, 
Clara Heronia Carney, 
Emma Phillips Cole, 



Helen Kollock Covell, 
Lucy Sherman Cushing, 
Cecilia Agnes Deane, 
Elizabeth Esther Duchenay, 
Jessie Belle Flagg, 
Jeannette Belle Fuller, 
Nellie Elthea Gibson, 
Melvetta Gertrude Harding, 
Susan Frances Haskins, 
Helen Louise Hatch, 
Maria Holcomb, 
Florence Annie Howland, 
Jane Terry Ingraham, 
Carolyn Sanford Jones, 
Elizabeth May Kenyon, 
Abby Almy Knowlton, 
Marie Whitridge Macomber, 
Annie Cook Manchester, 
Maud Metcalf, 
Mary Fox Moore, 
Lillie May Moulton, 
Clara Watson Phinney, 
Abbie Durfee Sherman, 
Clara Eliza Sherman, 
Bertha Louisa Sisson, 
Mabel W^ng Smith, 
Lottie Francis Sturtevant, 
Delia Francis Tripp, 
Bessie Louise Twiss, 
Grace Evelyn Wilson. 



RECIPIENTS OF CERTIFICATES. 



Lucy Gardner, 



Annie Florence Mosiier. 



24 SCHOOL REPORT. 



In S(^H()Ol Committke, 

January 2, 189«. 
liesolvfitL That the thanks of the (.'oniinitteo are due and arc herel»v 
tendered to His Honor, Mayor Parker, for the courteous manner in 
which he has presided over the deliberations of the Board during the 
past year. 

lifisolved^ That the thanks of the Board are liereby tendered to the 
Secretary for his promptness and courtesy in the disi^harji^e of tiis 
duties. 

ReHolvpiU That the thanks of this Board be and tiiey are herel)y ten- 
dered the Vice Cliairman, F. A. Milliken, for the faithful and impartial 
manner in which he has performed the duties of his office. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



25 



NEW BEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

RATES OF TUITION FOR NON-RKSIDENT PUPILS, 1896. 



High school, 
Grammar schools, 
Primary schools, 
Ungraded schools, 
Eveniug Drawing school, 



First 
'IVrm. 

61i)/2S 

S.25 

(>.10 

1().(>0 



Second 
Term. 

>151I).2S 
8.2.5 
(kIO 

10. (;o 




d2o.7() 
1 1 .00 

8.1;^ 

14.11 



For the 
Year. 



904.26 
27.50 
20.32 

a.5.:n 

11.32 



26 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



RULES GOVERNING TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



Priucipal of High school, 
Sub-master of Iligli school. 
Science teacher of High school, 
Lady assistants of High school, 
Military instructor of High school, 
Principals of .Grammar schools, 
Principals' Assistant of Grammar schools, 
Assistants of Grammar schools, 
Principals of Primary schools. 
Assistants of Primary schools, 
Principal of Training school, 
Vice-Principal of Training school. 
Senior in Training school, 
Ungraded schools. 
Principals of Evening schools, 
Assistants of Evening schools. 
Supervisor of drawing. 
Teacher of drawing in High school and 
assistant teacher in elementary grades. 
Supervisor of music. 
Teacher of sewing. 
Assistants ai the rate of 
Cooking teacher, 
Manual training teacher. 



$650 



Maximum. Minimum. 

$2,750 

1,600 

1,600 

900 

300 

1,900 

O/i) 

600 

600 to 875 

550 

1,500 

1,200 

4 per week. 
525 to 700 

3.50 to 4.50 per night. 
1.50 per night. 
1,300 



425 



375 



800 
1,900 
600 
525 
600 
1,200 



The salary of a Primary School Principal of a four- 
room building is $6oo per year which is increased at the 
rate of $25 for each additional room. 

The salaries of assistant teachers in the High school are 
increased at the rate of $50 per year until the maximum 
is reached. 

The minimum yearly salary of a Grammar school as- 
sistant is fixed at $425, and the yearly advance is $25 per 
year until a yearly salary of $500 is reached ; the annual 
increase is then $50 per annum until the maximum ($600) 
is reached. Principals' assistants only are paid $675. 

The minimum yearly salary of a Primary school assist- 
ant is tixed at $375, and the yearly advance is $25 per 
year until a yearly salary of $450 is reached ; the annual 
increase is then $50 per annum until the maximum ($550) 
is reached. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

BRIEF DESCKIII'IOX OF THE SCHOOLIIOl'SES, WITH TIIEIH 
ACCOMMODATIONS AND CONDITIONS. 



4C«dar. 
BCadnt- Grove. 
eCaBDouvIlle. 
7 Clark's Point. 



.1 High. 

IXlHurrlncton HemoilBl 
ltl»>lvla Ann Huwlnml. 
.linilen. 



1 



•*te 



n llou-iuJDil.' 1 



WOikI. 
Drivk. 
Wowt. 

iwoilir. 

illrlck. 
illrlrk. 

Hrlpk. 



jO;ritlDvll1e. 
31 Rockdale. 

SiThoinpiian. 



Itrlck. 
Woii.1 



II 



awjuowi. 

Ml|oI™.'v 



.r'- 



I wiJir' 



28 SCHOOL REPORT. 



CALENDAR, 1896. 

Winter term begius Jan. H, 1896; ends March 27, 1896. 
Summer term begins April 6, 1S96; ends June 26, 1896. 
Fall term begins Sept. 8, 1896; ends Dec. 18, 1896. 

VACATIONS. 

March 28, 1896, to April 6, 1896. 
June 27, 1896, to Sept. 1, 1896. 
Dec. 18, 1896, to Jan. 4, 1897. 

HOLIDAYS. 

Every Saturday; Washington's Birthday; Patriot's Day; Memorial 
Day; from Wednesday noon before Thanksgiving the remainder of the 
week. 

SCHOOL SESSIONS. 

Grammar, Manual Training and Mill schools: From March 1 to No- 
vember 1, 9 A. M. to 11.45 A. M., 1.45 r. M. to 4 P. M. ; from November 1, 
to March 1,9 a. m. to 11.45 a.m., 1.30 p. m. to 3.45 P. M. 

Primary schools: From March 1 to November 1, 9 A. M. to 12 M., 2 
p. M. to 4 p. M.; from November 1 to March 1, 9 A. M. to 11.40 a. m. 
without recess, 1.30 p. m. to 3.30 p. m. 

High school : 8.30 a. m. to 1.30 p. M., during the whole year. 

Country schools: Sessions as prescribed by the Committee on Un- 
graded schools, subject to tlie approval of the Board. 

The signal for no-session is two strokes of the tire alarm once re- 
repeated (2-2). 

When given at 8.15 a. m. the morning session shall be omitted. 
When given at 12.45 p. M. the afternoon session shall be omitted. 

This regulation does not apply to the High school or to the ungraded 
schools except those designated by the Board. 

Th(^ no-session signal on stormy days shall not apply to the sessions 
of the Manual Training or the Cooking schools; and pupils attending 
tliosi? schools shall not be excused for non-attendance upon them on ac- 
count of the no-session signal. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



k :;•.!.-"» 


s,==. 


J 




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- 








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1 


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1 











SCHOOL REPORT. 



a 
S 

< 

W = , — " — 





- 


] 


L. n"3 :ssssa ^ 


i 


issss&sss , 


JO luaqn 


^i^S £38558 = 


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s 


o=.8-s« - 1 


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i 


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1 l?.5gS^5 


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SCHOOL KEPORT. 





5 .„ 


S £!3:i3 


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a S 5 


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° ! B 




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32 



SCHCX)L. REPORT. 



AVERAGE AGE OF PUPILS IN VARIOUS 

GRADES. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Senior Isub-Seulorj Junior ;Sub.Junlori ^^^^^^ 



Yra. Mob. ' Yrs. Mos. 



18 



Yrs. Mos. Yra. Mos. ! Yrs. Mos. 

I I 

16 3 ; 15 5 I 16 9 



GRAMMAR DEPARTMENT. 



School. 



Fifth 
Year 



Sixth 
Year 



Seventh 
Year 



Yrs. Mos. Yrs. Mop., Yrn. Moi*. 



Eighth j Ninth iAv^age ace 
Year i Year by 6<*ho«T? 



Yr8. Mo8.lYr8. Mob. Yrs. Mo.s 



Fifth Street. 
MhlUlo Street. 
Parker Street. 
Thompson Street. 
Cedar Grove Street. 
Harrington Memorial. 



Average age by gra<le8 



11 



11 9 I 11 10 

11 7 12 4 

11 ^ 12 3 

11 7 12 8 

12 I 12 7 
11 6 12 



'i 



12 3 



13 
13 
13 
13 



3 
3 



13 2 



13 


8 


14 


9 


13 




14 


1 


14 


S 


13 


4 


13 


9 


14 




13 
12 
12 
11 


5 

4 



13 10 



14 8 



12 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



33 



AVERAGE AGE OF PUPILS IN VARIOUS 

GRADES. 



PRIMARY DEPARTMKNT. 





First- 


Second 


Third 


Fourth 




Year 


Year 


Year 


Year 


School. 












Yrs. Mo8. 


Yrs. Mod. 


Yrs. Mos. 


Yrs. Mos. 


Hhnet Avenue. 


7 5 


» » 


10 5 


10 8 


. BeDjamln. 


ft 10 


8 5i 


» 


10 104 


%r Grove Street. 


« 


\) 5 


11 7 


12 2 


ftr Street. 


6 4 


8 1 


» 9 


10 4 


DODVllle. 


K 10 


7 10 


9 5 


10 8 


tmouth Street. 




8 10 


» 8 


10 34 


maB A. Greene. 


7 8 8 7 





10 10 


. Howland. 


(> 10 


8 10 


9 8 


10 10 


ring^n Memorial. 


H 4 


8 


9 4 


10 1 


leo Street. 


7 6 


7 11 


9 9 


10 8 


rlmac Street. 


6 » 


» 2 


ft 1 i 


11 2 


: field Street. 


K 8 


8 2 


9 5 


10 2 


tnpson Street. 




8 8 






rerage age by grades. 


m 
1 


8 74 


9 84 


10 8 



AveraKO age 
by scnoolH 



Yrs. Mos. 



9 
8 
10 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 
8 
8 
9 
8 



10 



UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 



Acushnet School. 
Clark's Point School. 
Rocki!ale School. 
Norih School. 
North Mill School. 
South Mill School. 



Grammar 
Department 



Av. age by departments. 



Yrs. Mos. 



12 
12 
12 
12 



Jt 



10 
4 

8 



12 



54 



Primary : Average ago 
Department ' by scliools 



Yrs. Mos. 



Yrs. Mos. 



8 


n 


10 


8 


7 


10 




1 


2 


9 


11 


7 




9 


6 






13 


10 






14 




7 


7 


11 


3 



SCHCX>L REPORT. 



PAROCHIAL AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS. 



REPORT FOK YEAR BEGINNING JANUARY 8, 1995. ENDIN^ 
DECEMBER 20, 1895. 



,.,„0,.,„.0H„„. 


Boy» 


r' 


■5-= 


Is 

I 

STB 


1 


1 


1 


1 
11 


1 


i 


1 


1 


St. Joeeph'H. 1 408 
St. HHy-D. 371 
Sacred Heart. Md 
St. llyaclntti. IBS 


M3 


-64 




10 


HI 
MO 


us 

MO 
1 


H3- 




*H 


" 


I'UIViTE BOHilOU. ISS 

1 


1390 


SOTS 


aifli 

ITI 


ST. 


13 


m 


1710 


IR 


: 


» 



SCHOOL REPORT. 35 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

SCIENCE. 

Appletoirs Young Chemist. 

Renisen's Chemistry. 

AIleQ'S Laboratory Manual. 

Dana's Geological Story Briefly Told. 

Packard's Zoology. * 

Youman's Botany. 

Apgar*8 Plant Analysis. 

Avery's Natural Philosophy. 

Gillet and Rolfe's Astronomy. 

Physiography. 

Mills* Realm of Nature. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Guyot's Physical Geography. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. 

Dalton^s Physiology and Hygiene. 
Hutchinson's Physiology and Hygiene. 



MATHEMATICS. 

Robinson's Arithmetic, Part 11. 
Weirs Academic Arithmetic. 
Wentworth's School Algebra. 
Went worth's New Plane Geometry. 
Wentworth's Plane and Solid Greometry. 
Went worth's Trigonometry. 
Meservey's Bookkeeping. 
Meservey's Bookkeeping Blanks. 

HISl'ORY. 

Barnen^s History of Ancient Peoples. 
Swinton's Outlines World's History. 
Lancaster's History of England. 
Fiske's History of the United States. 
Martin's Civil Government. 



36 SCHOOL RBPORT. 

ENGLISH. 

D. J. Hiirs Rhetoric and (imposition. 

Whitney-Lockwood Euglish Grammar. 

Ix>ckwood^s Lessons in English. 

Southworth & Goddard's Elements of English Grammar. 

Underwood's American Authors. 

Underwood's British Authors. 

Brook's Euglish Literature. 

Dowden^s Shakespeare. 

Monroe's Sixth Reader. 

Irving's Sketch Book. 

Longfellow's Eyangeline. 

Scott's Lady of the Lake. 

Franklin's Autobiography. 

Bryant's Poems. 

Holmes's The Chambered Nautilus. 

Lowell's My Garden Acquaintance, The Vision of Sir Launfal. 

Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome. 

Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Midsummer Night's Dream. 

Addison's The Sir Roger de Ooverley Papers. 

Tennyson's The Coming of Arthur, Elaine, Guinevei-e, The Passing of 

Arthur. 
Milton's Paradise Lost, Book L 
Shakespeare's As You Like It and Julius CsBsar. 
Chaucer's Prologue to the Canterbury Tales. 
Spenser's Faerie Queen, First Canto. 
Shakespeare's Hamlet. 
Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration. 
Burke's On American Taxation. 
Burke's On Conciliation with America. 

GERMAN. 

Wenckebach's Deutsche Grammatik. 

Harris's German Lessons. 

Henesrt's Der Noue Leitfaden. 

(irimm's Huus Miirchen. 

(ioethe's Hermann and Dorothea. 

Abu H(Min*s (iennan l^udiinents. 

Otto's (lonaaii (Jraiuinar. 

Eiclieiiilort. Aus dem LobcQ Eines 'I'augenichts. 

Iviclil. Der Flucli der ScliOnhoit. 

(;hainisso. Peter Sehleinil. 

Fn'vlag. Aus d«Mii Staat Friedricli's des Grosseu. 



SCHCX)L REPORT. 37 

Heine. Die HarzreLse. 

Goethe. Dichtung und Wahrheit, Hermann und Dorothea. 

Lesding. Minna von Barnhelm. 

Schiller. Wilhelin Tell, Das Glied von der Glocke. 

Wenckebach. Lyrics and Ballads, Die Schdnsten deutschen Lieder. 

GKEEK. 

White's First Lessons in Greek. 

Goodwin's Greek Grammar. 

Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

Goodwin's Xenophon and Herodotus. 

Hoisc's Homer's Iliad. 

Autenrieth's Homeric lexicon. 

Crosby's Greek lexicon. 

Manatt's Xenophon Hellenica, Books I-IV. 

WoodruiTs* Greek Prose Composition. 

Perrin's Homer's Odyssey (for '*Homerat Sight''). 

Harper's Xenophon's Anabasis (for ''Xenophon at Sight"). 

LATIN. 

Collar & Daniell's Fii*st Latin Book. 

Jones's First Lessons in Latin. 

Harkness's Latin Grammar. 

Allen & Greenough's Crpsar. 

Greenough's Virgil. 

Harkness's Cicero. 

Jones's Latin Prose Composition. 

Lindsay's Nepos. 

Kelsey's Selections from Ovid. 

Harper's Virgil (for ''Virgil at Sight''). 

fren(;h. 

Van Daell's French (jrainniar. 

KeetePs French Reader. 

Roulier's First Book in French Composition . 

Chardeual's French Course . 

Ilenncquin's Idiomatic Frencli. 

Sauveur's Causeries avec mes Eleves. 

Spiers & Surennc's French Dictionary. 

Grdville. Dosia. 

BedoHiere. La Mere Michel. 

Halevy. Vn Mariage d'Amour. 



38 SCHOOL REPORT. 

About. La Mere de la Marquise. 

Labiche. IjB Voyage de M. Perrichon. 

Sand. La Mare au Diable. 

Erckmann-ChatriaD. Le Oonscrit de 1S13. 

Daudet. Le Siege de Berlin, La Dernldre Classe. 

Merlm^e. Colomba. 

DeVigny. Cinq Mars. 

De Lamartiue. Graziella. 

Dumas. La Tulipe Noire. 

Sandeau. Mademoiselle de la Seigliere. 

Scribe et Legouve. Bataille de Dames. 

Lamartine. Jeanne d'Arc. 

La Fontaine. Fables, Books 1 and II. 

Moliere. L' Avare, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomrae. 

Corn^ille. Le Cid, Horace. 

Racine. Andromaque, Iphig^nie. 

SUPPLEMENTARY BOOKS USED IN THE HIGH 

SCHOOL. 

WelPs University Algebra. 
Chauvenet's Geometry. 
Walpole's Virgil, Book 1. 
Sprague's Masterpieces in English Literature. 
Scott's Poems. 

Sprague's Paradise Lost, Books 1 and 2. 
Hudson's Shakespeare, Vols, 1 and 2. 
Rolfe's Childe Harold. 
Collier's History of English I/iterature. 
Lay of the Last Minstrel. 
Vicar of Wakefield. 
Shakespeare, by K. Grant White. 
Martin's English Language. 
Strang's Exercises in English. 
Modern Classics : 

Goldsmith, Cowper and Hemaus. 

Fouque and St. Pierre. 

Byron and Hood. 

Burns and Scott. 

Fields :ind Hawthorne. 

Holmes and Brown. 

Howell s. 

Campbell and Rogers. 

Carl vie, Lamb and Southev. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 39 

Wordsworth and Coleridge. 

Dickens and Fields. 

Whittier. 

Hawthorne and Carlylo. 
Thackeray's Essays on Swift, Congreve, and Steele. 
Maeaulay's Life and Writings of Addison. 
The Four Georges, Thackeray. 
Thackeray's Essays on Prior, Gay, Pope, Hogarth, Smollett, Fielding, 

Sterne and Goldsmith. 
Milton and Byron, Macaulay. 
Sir Roger de Coverly, from Spectator. 
Macaulay's Essay on Johnson. 

Hacaulay's Essays on Goldsmith, Bunyan and Madame D' Arblay. 
Goldsmith's Plays. 
Goldsmith's Poems. 
Heath's German Dictionary. 
Boisen's German Prose. 
Wenckebach's Anschauung's Unterricht. 
Johnson's Schiller's Ballads. 
Sauveur's Contes Merveillcux. 
1^ Roi des Montagncs, About. 

La FJtt^rature Fran<,*aise Contemporaine, by Pylodet. 
La LittSrature Fran<;aise Classique, Mennechet. 
Emerson's Essays. 
Swinton's Word Analysis. 
Swinton's School Composition. 
American Poems. 
About Old Story Tellers. 
Anderson's Historical Readers. 
I^ Tour de la France. 
Perry's Bible Manual. 
Seaver & Walton's Metric System. 
Sawyer's Metric System. 

Model Etymology, Webb. « 

Stein's German Exercises. 
Kellogg's Rhetoric. 
Smith's Principia Latina. 
Craik's English of Shakespean^ Julius Ca'sar. 
Jackson's Mathematical Geography. 
Shaler's First Book in (ieology. 
Collar's Practical Latin Composition. 
Grav's Lessons in Botany. 
Earl of Chatham, Macaulay. 
Courtship of Miles Standish. 
Emerson's American Scholar. 



40 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Com US. 

Lodge's Mechanics. 

Hall & BergeD^s Physics. 

The House of llie Seven Gables. 

Fisk's Civil Government. 

Luquien's French Prose. 

The Abbott, by Scott. 

Whitney's The Essentials of English. 

Carhart & Chute's Physics. 

Appleton's School Physics. 

Macaulay's Essays — Milton and Addison. 

The Foundations of Rhetoric, by A. S. Hill. 

Irving's Tales of a Traveller. 

The Plague Year, by DeFoe. 

Arnold^s Sohrab & Rustum. 

Scott's Woodstock. 

Silas Marncr, George Eliot. 

Montgomery's leading Facts of English History. 

Smith's Smaller History of Greece. 

Gray's Botany. 

Well's Geometry. 

Berlitz Methode fttr den deutschen ITnterricht, Zvveiter Theil. 

High School Choir. 

High School Music Reader. 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE GRAMMAR 

SCHOOLS. 

Franklin New Third Reader. 

Franklin New Fourth Reader. 

Franklin New Fifth Reader. 

Franklin Sixth Reader. 

Bradbury's Eaton's Elementary Arlthmetir. 

Bradbury's Eaton's Practical Arithmetic. 

Prince's Arithmetic, Part IV. 

Prince's Arithmetic, Part V. 

Prince's Arithmetic, Part VI. 

Seaver & Walton's Mental Arithmetic. 

Warren's Common School (Geography. 

Harper's Introductorj' (Geography. 

Worcester's School Dictionary. 

liarnes's History of the United States. 

Hyde's Language Lessons, Part I. 

Hyde's Language Lessons, Part 11. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 4 I 

Hyde's Language Lessons, AdvaDced. 
Harrington's Speller, Parts I and U. 
May's Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene. 
Blaisdell's How To Keep Well. 
Prang's Drawing Books. 
Merrill's Vertical Writing Books. 
Second National Music Reader. 
Third National Music Reader. 
Fourth National Music Reader. 

SUPPLEMENTARY BOOKS USED IN THE 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Kggleston's First Book in American History. 

Higginson's History of the United States. 

Dickens' Cliild's History of England. 

Andersen's Historical Reader. 

Collier's British History. 

Mckenzie's America. 

Ballou's Footprints of Travel. 

Sea Side and Way Side, Part II. 

Sea Side and Way Side, Part HI. 

Child's Book of Nature, Parts I, II, 111, IV. 

<'hoice Readings in Nature's Book. 

Johounot's Geographical Reader. 

Scrihner's (Geographical Reader. 

Our World, Part 1. 

Our World, Part 11. 

Fables and Folk Stories. 

Kingsley's Water Babies. 

Riverside Series Nos. 

Tanglewood Tales. 

Grandfather's Chair. 

True Stories. 

Robinson Crusoe. 

Golden Book of Choice Readings. 

American Authors. 

Swinton's Book of Tales. 

Swinton's Supplementary Rejuler. 

Swinton's American Classics. 

Swinton's English Classics. 

Swiss Family Robinson. 

Washington Irviug's Sketch Book. 

Lincoln's Gettysburg. 

6 



42 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Arabian Nights. 

Vicar of Waliefleld. 

King of the Golden River. 

Church's Old World Stories. 

Hans Brinker. 

Black Beauty. 

Little Men. 

Little Flower People. 

Little Lord Fauntleroy. 

Heroic Ballads. 

At the Back of the North Wind. 

Stories of Industry. 

Blue Jackets of 1776. 

Blue Jackets of 1812. 

Bluejackets of 1861. 

World at Home, Europe. 

World at Home, The World. 

Peasant and Prince. 

Prince and Pauper. 

Quentin Durward. 

Whittier's Snow Bound. 

Glee and Chorus Book. 

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE PRIMARY 

SCHOOLS. 

Franklin New First Header. 

Franklin New Second Reader. 

Franklin New Third Reader. 

Harrington's Speller, Part I. 

Prince's Arithmetic, Part IL 

Prince's Arithmetic, Part III. 

Prang's Drawing Books. 

Merrill's Vertical Writing Books. 

National Music Second Readers and Charts. 

SUPPLEMENTARY BOOKS USED IN THE PRI- 
MARY SCHOOLS. 

Monroe's Primer. 
Monroe's First Header. 
Monroe's Second Header. 
Monroe's Third Header. 
Parker & Marvel's First Book. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 43 



Parker & Marvers Second Book. 

Sheldon's Second Reader. 

Sheldon's Third Reader. 

Appleton's First Reader. 

Appleton's Second Reader. 

Appleton's Third Reader. 

Swinton*s Second Reader. 

Swinton's Third Reader. 

Willson's First Reader. 

Willson's Second Reader. 

Willson's Third Reader. 

Butler's First Reader. 

Butler's Second Reader. 

Stickney's First Reader. 

Stickney^s Second Reader, 

Holmes's First Reader. 

Holmes's Second Reader, 

Harper's First Reader. 

Harper's Second Reader. 

Normal Primer. 

Normal First Reader. 

Barnes's First Reader. 

Barnes's Second Reader. 

Barnes's Third Reader. 

Modern Second Reader. 

Cleveland's First Reader. 

Seven Little Sisters. 

Each and All. 

Andersen's Fairy Tales. 

King's Picturesque Geography. 

Seaside and Wayside, Part I. 

Baker's Young Folks' Geography. 

Fables and Folk Stories. 

Wood's Natural History First Reader. 

Wood's Natural History Second Reader. 

Wood's Natural History Third Reader, 

Heart of Oak Series, No. 1. 

Heart of Oak Series, No. 2. 

Verse and Prose for Beginners. 

u£sop'8 Fables, Vols. I. and II. 

Grimm's Fairy Tales. 

Legends of Norseland. 

Riverside Primmer and First Reader. 



44 SCHOOL REPORT. 

PEDAGOGICAL LIBRARY. 

« 

Rooks added durin|2^ the year as follows : — 

224 Trees of North Eastern America. Charles S. Newhall. 

225 Shrubs of North Ea8t<3rn America. Charles S. Newhall. 

226 Human Bod3\ Martiu. 

227 Commissioners* Report ou Manual Training. 
2*28 Keport of the Committee of Ten. 

229 Talks on Pedago^cics. Col. Parker. 

230 Talks on Pedagogics. Col. Parker. 

231 Talks on Pedagogics. Col. Parker. 

232 Outlines of Pedagogics. Rein. 

233 Mistakes in Teaching. Huglie.«. 

234 How to Know The Wild Flowers. Daua. 

235 Eclectic Physical Geography. Hinnman. 

236 Elementary Meteorology. Davis. 

237 The Realm of Nature. MiV\ 

238 Sea and Land. Shaler. 

239 Methods of Mind Training. Aiken. 

240 First Book in Geology. Shalet^- 

241 The Psychology of Number. McIvcUan & Duvc*^- 

242 Physiography. T. H. Huxle- :^ 



SCHOOL REPORT. 45 

SCHOOL BOARD, 1895. 

DAVID L. PARKER, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 



FRANK A. MILLIKEN, Vice-Chairraan. 



WILLIAM E. HATCII, Secretary and Superintendent. 



OLIVER PRESCOrr, Jr., President of the Common Council, ex officio. 



Ward 1 — George W. UiUmau, Louis Z. Normandiu, Anna R. Borden. 
Ward 2— Isaac B. Tompkins, Jr., Frank A. Milliken, Edward T. Tucker. 
Ward i?- William R. ChauniuK, William H. Pitman, Stephen II. Shep- 
herd. 
Ward 4— Ada W. Tilliufi:hast, Seth W. Godfrey, Geor>?e H. Batchelor. 
Ward .^ — Jonathan Rowland, Jr., Sylvia B. Knowlton, Robert W. 

Taber. 
Ward 6 — Betsey B. Winslow, Francis M. Kennedy, Joseph C. Pothier. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
William E. Hatch, Secretary. 

The first named on each standing committee is Clialrman of the same. 

On High iS'c^oo/— Pitman, Ilowland, Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, 
Tompkins, Shepherd, Batchelor, Channing, Milliken. 

On Grammar Schools — Tompkins, Pitman, Rowland, Mrs. Borden, 
Milliken, Taber, Channing, Mrs. Knowlton, Shepherd. 

On Primary ^VcAooZ^— Shepherd, Tompkins, MiSs Winslow, Mrs. Bor- 
den, Kennedy, Godfrey, Channing, Tucker, Taber. 

On Ungraded Schools — Mrs. Borden, Howlaud, Godfrey, Pothier, Ta- 
ber, Tucker, Normandin, Mrs. Tillinghast. 

On Training School — Milliken, Pitman, Kennedy, Miss Winslow, 
Channing, Pothier, Mrs. Knowlton, Hillman. 

On Truants— Qodtrey^ Pothier, Normandin, Mrs. Tillinghast. 
On Evening Schools — Kennedy, Hillman, Godfrey, Tucker, Pothier, 
Normandin, Mrs. Knowlton, Mrs. Tillinghast. 

On Music — Batchelor, Mrs. Borden, Godfrey, Shepherd, Taber, 
Pothier, Normandin, Mrs. Knowlton. 

On Manual Training — Hillman, Miss Winslow, Batchelor, Kennedy, 
Godfrey, Tucker, Normandin, Mrs. Knowlton. 



46 SCHOOL REPORT. 

On Examination of Teachers — Miss Winslow, Mrs. Borden, Tucker, 
Batchelor, Mrs. Tillinghast. 

On Text Books — Pitman, Kennedy, Milliken, Pothier, Tucker, Mrs. 
Knowlton, Mrs. Tillinghast, Hillman. 

On Expenditures — Rowland, Tompkins, Pitman, Shepherd, Kennedy, 
Milliken, Taber, Chauning, Prescott. 

On Howland Fund — Tompkins, Rowland, Pitman, Shepherd, Ken- 
nedy, Milliken, Channing, Hillman, Prescott. 

On Bules—T&ber^ Tucker, Pothier, Batchelor, Hillman. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



47 



SCHOOL BOARD, 1896. 

DAVID L. PAKKER, Mayor, Chairman ex officio. 



FRANK A. MILIJKEN, V ice-Chairman. 



WILLIAM E. HATCH, Secretary and Superintendent. 

Office 133 William street. 
)fHce Hours, 8.30 to 9 a. if ., li.SO to 1 p. u. Satunlays, 9 to 9.80 A. if . 

3UR L. BLACKMER, i*re?ident of the Common Council ex officio. 

liar meetings of the Boani, first Monday of each month at 7.80 p. M., except lu 
» of January, August and September. In January and September, the meet- 
ill be held the Tuesday after the first Monday. In August no meeting of the 
will be held. 



Name. 

H. Lowe, 

;e W. Hillman, 

Z. Normandiu, 

rd T. Tucker, 
B. Tompkins, Jr., 
A. Milliken, 

en H. Shepherd, 
,m R. Channing, 
.m H. Pitman, 

e H. Batchelor, 
V. Tillinghast, 
V. Godfrey, 

t W. Taber, 

tian Howland, Jr., 

I B. Knowlton, 



WARD ONE. 
Plac« of Business. 
925 Acushnet avenue, 

584 Purchase street, 

WARD TWO. 

258 Pleasant street, 
78 Union street, 
43 William street, 

WARD THREE. 

Standard office, 
192 Union street. 



Residence. 

931 Acushnet avenue. 
1036 Acushnet avenue. 
586 Purchase street. 

258 Pleasant street. 
691 County street. 
290 Pleasant street. 

154 Maxtleld street. 
53 Fifth street. 



Five Cents Savings Bank, 60 Chestnut street. 

WARD FOUR. 

Institution for Savings, 187 Cottage street. 

37 Eighth street. 
429 Union street. 

WARD FIVE. 

28 Pleasant street, 48 Fifth street. 

54 Russell street. 
348 Union street. 



WARD SIX. 



ice R. Sherman, 7 I^eonard street, 

r B. Winslow, 

is M. Kennedy, Eddy Building, 



248 County street. 
315 County street. 
93 Washington street. 



EMMA M. ALMY, Superintendent's Clerk. 
ARY C. POITEK, Assistant Clerk in Superintendent's Office, 

and Clerk at High School. 



JY SMITH, Truant Officer, 372 Cottage street. 

JAM A. BAKER, Truant Officer, 214 Fourth street. 

Office Hours, 12.30 to 1 F. M. ; Saturdays, !) to 9.30 A. M. 

SGE K. DAMMOX, Messenger and Truant Officer, 137 Smith street. 



c of Superintendent of v'^chools open from 8.30 a. M. to 4.30 P. M., except Satur- 
Saturdays, from i) a. m. to 11 A. M., i P. m. to 4 p. m. 



48 SCHOOL REPORT. 

STANDING COMMrrrEES. 



William E. Hatch, Secretary. 

The first named on each standing committee is Chairman of the same. 

On High School — Pitmau, Howland^ Winslow, Tompkins, Shepher 
Batchelor, Channing, Milliken, KDowltoD. 

On Grammar Schools — Tompkins, Pitman, Rowland, Mllliken, T 
ber, Channing, Knowlton, Shepherd, Tillinghast. 

On Primary Schools — Shepherd, Tompkins, Winslow, Kennedy, Goil- 
frey. Tucker, Taber, Tillinghast, Lowe. 

On Ungraded Schools — Tucker, Rowland, Godfrey, Taber, Nonnau- 
din, Tillinghast, Sherman, Lowe. 

On Training School — Milliken, Kennedy, Winslow, Knowlton, Rill- 
man, Tillinghast, Batchelor. 

O/t Truants— GoiMrey^ Normandin, Sherman, Lowe. 

On Evening Schools — Keunedj', Hillman, Godfrey, Tucker, Xormau- 
din, Knowlton, Tillinghast, Sherman, Lowe. 

On Music — Batchelor, Godfrey, Shepherd, Taber, Knowlton. 

On Manual Training — Rillman, Winslow, Batchelor, Godfrey, Tucker, 
Normandin, Knowlton, Sherman, Lowe. 

On Examination of Teachers — Winslow, Tucker, Batchelor, Tilling- 
hast, Kennedy. 

On Text 5ooA\<j— Tillinghast, Kennedy, Milliken, Tucker, Knowlton, 
Rillman, Lowe. 

On Expenditures — Rowland, Tompkins, Pitman, Shepherd, Kennedy, 
Milliken, Taber, Channing, Blackmer. 

On Jlowland Fund — Tompkins, Rowland, Pitman, Shepherd, Ken- 
nedy, Milliken, Channing, RillnuMi, Blackmer. 

On liules — Taber, Tucker, Batchelor, Rillman, Sherman. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUP[1T[NDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



FOR THE YEAR 1895. 



Report of the Superintendent. 



To the School Committee : 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I hereby submit to you my 
eighth annual report. It is the thirty-fifth of the series of 
Annual Reports of the Superintendent of Schools of the 
city. By a vote of your board, this report, together with 
that of the secretary, is to constitute the Annual Report of 
the School Committee. 

ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 
OF THE CITY, INCLUDING PRIVATE AND 
PAROCHIAL. 

The reports for the year show a large increase in the 
enrollment and attendance of pupils in the public schools. 
The reports from the private and parochial schools show 
quite an increase in the attendance upon them also. The 
gain in the public schools was much larger than the year 
before, being 434. The per cent, of attendance was a 
slight improvement over the preceding year, but the cases 
of tardiness and dismissal were more especially the cases 
of dismissal, which increased 6234. 

The tardinesses and dismissals in the schools have been 
growing evils for several years. In certain rooms of the 
primary schools in the north and south parts of the city, 



52 superintendent's report. 

dismissals have been so numerous as to affect the work. 
The chief reason why so many pupils were dismissed in 
them was that the pupils might carry the dinners to mem- 
bers of their family who worked in the mills. The Board 
has suspended forenoon recesses in the primary schools 
during the winter months partly for this reason. Many 
pupils are dismissed in all the schools for various other 
causes ; but no individual pupil asks as a rule to be dis 
missed oftener than once a week except to carry dinners 
or newspapers. The great mass of the pupils seldom 
ask to be dismissed, but many of them suffer from the fact 
that many of those regularly dismissed become drags 
upon their classes. Many cases of tardiness are caused 
by boys who go on miik routes and by children who are 
obliged to assist at home. These may be classed as ex- 
cusable cases ; but there are too many which are not 
excusable ; and many parents are responsible for en- 
gendering bad habits in their children by excusing their 
unnecessary failings. The teachers are constantly being 
checkmated in their efforts to inculcate good habits in their 
pupils by the want of cooperation on the part of many 
parents. 

I give in this connection a comparative statement of at- 
tendance in all the schools of the city for the year 1894 
and 1895. On a preceding page of this report is given a 
tabulated statement of the attendance, tardinesses, dis- 
missals and other items of interest in all the schools of 
the city. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



Knrollinoiit of pupils, 
Av<Mao:<^ iminber belon^inj^, 
Avoni^o daily atten(l«aiu*e, 
Per cent, of attendants, 
Number eases of tardiness, 
Number eases dismissals. 



1895. 


1S94. 


lucreafte. 


7,800 


7,42G 


4M 


6,00.") 


5,751 


254 


5,542 


5,270 


272 


J)2.;{ 


9L8 


.5 


10,003 


15,893 


110 


38,1S4 


31,9.50 


0,234 



superintendent's report. 53 

PRIVATE AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. 

1895. 1894. Increase. 

EnrolimeDt of pupils, 2,978 2,852 126 

Average Dumber belonging, 2,525 2,472 53 

Average daily attendance, 2,339 2,272 67 

Per cent, of daily attendance, 92.6 92.3 .3 

PUBLIC, PRIVATE AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. 

1895. 1894. Increase. 

Enrollment of pupils, 10,838 10,278 560 

Average number belonging, 8,530 8,223 307 

Average daily attendance, 7,881 7,542 339 

Per cent, of daily attendance, 92.4 92.1 .3 

TRUANCY. 

The Board has appointed an additional truant officer, 
William A. Baker, who entered upon the duties of his 
office last September. Prior to his appointment, one 
officer, Henry Smith, attended to the absenteeism in the 
daj' schools : the other, George K. Dammon, attended to 
the absenteeism in the evening schools and in addition 
was janitor of the School Committee rooms and Superin- 
tendent's office, attending in that capacity not only to the 
ordinary duties of a janitor, but receiving and distributing 
under the direction of the Superintendent all the books 
and supplies used in the schools ; he also acted as mes- 
senger of the Board and the Superintendent. The at- 
tendance upon both the day and evening schools became 
so large, and the amount of books and supplies used grew 
to such proportions that neither of these men could perform 
adequately the duties required of them. The Board re- 
cognized this and appointed the additional officer. The 
city has been divided into two districts for the purpose of 
truant service and absenteeism, and Mr. Smith and Mr. 
Baker look after these matters in both the da}^ and even- 
ing schools. Each day school is visited by one of these 
officers each school day, and they also see that the law is 



54 superintendent's report. 

enforced in regard to attendance of illiterates in the even- 
ing schools. They also perform truant service for the pa- 
rochial schools, when such service is needed. The work 
is now being very satisfactorily performed, and few truants 
or other offenders against the school laws relating to atten- 
dance, escape their vigilance. Mr. Dammon is also ap- 
pointed truant officer that he may act in case of necessity. 

I have spoken so frequently in previous reports of the 
causes of truancy, that it is needless for me to repeat here 
what I have said. Notwithstanding all the efforts that are 
exerted by teachers and truant officers, the ratio of truants 
holds about the same as it has for some years. The schools 
are constantly being recruited by a large class of pupils 
over whom no wholesome home influence is exerted, many 
of whom also have not had the benefit of the training given 
in our lower schools. Their habits are bad before they 
enter our schools, and it is hard to train them into better 
ones. The primary causes of truancy and inexcusable 
absenteeism are the lack of proper home training and the 
latitude given to children by ignorant, weak, and some- 
times debased parents. 

I subjoin the reports of the officers for the past year. 

REPORT OF HENRY SMFFH, TRUANT OFFICER. 

Schools visited, 1,330 

Absences reported by teachers, W4 

Absences without permission of parents, 129 

Second offences, 29 

Third offences, 17 

Parents notified, 870 

Taken to school from street, lo 

Arrests, 12 

Prosecutions, 13 

On probation, i 

Sentenced to Truant school, 10 

Visits to mills. 16 

Violations of labor law, 6 

Prosecutions for neglect in sending children to school, 1 



superintendent's report. 55 

REPORT OF WILLIAM A. BAKER, TRUANT OFFICER. 

For September, October, November and December. 

Schools visited, 562 

Absences reported by teachers. 417 

Absences without permission of parents, 57 

Second offences, 9 

Third offences, 2 

Parents notified, 441 

Taken to school from street, 1^9 

Arrests, 1 

Prosecutions, 1 

On probation, 1 

Cases of tardiness investigated, 6 

Visits to mills, 7 

Violation of labor law, 

REPORT OF GEORGE K. DAMMON, TRUANT OFFICER. 

Visits to mills and mercantile establishments, 227 

Cases of absences from evening schools investigated, 306 

Visits to schools, 5 

Violation of labor law, 3 

LABOR LAWS AND EMPLOYMENT 

CERTIFICATES. 

All children under sixteen years of age who wish to 
work in any mercantile or manufacturing establishment of 
the city are compelled to secure an employment ticket from 
the oflSce of the Superintendent of Schools. This entails 
upon the office a great deal of labor in issuing the neces- 
sary tickets and recording them, and takes much time in 
making necessary explanations to those who are denied 
them. The laws also are somewhat complex, and are con- 
stantly being tinkered. Many who apply at the office for 
certificates, when refused, through ignorance of the laws 
blame the school authorities for the refusal. 

I have reason to think that occasionally a parent makes 
false oath as to the age of his child, but I think also that 
the cases are rarer than is intimated by some critics. I 



56 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



am not inclined to doubt a parent's oath because a child 
appears younger than is claimed. The laws relating to 
school attendance, if really intended to bear equably upon 
all in the requirements for school attendance, need much 
amending. The laws do not now give due recognition to 
educational attainment, and they also leave too many loop- 
holes for those who wish to evade the laws to do so. 

Many more certificates were issued from the office this 
year than last, and some idea can be had of the work re- 
quired in issuing them from the figures given below. 



Number of certificates issued, 










807 


For the first time, 








780 




Duplicate certificates, 
Birthplaces of those to whom certificates 
United States, 


were issued: 


27 
314 


807 


Canada, 








226 




England, 
Western Islands, 








117 
70 




Ireland, 








14 




Germanj', 
Scotland, 








13 
10 




Belgium, 
Russia, 








(i 
3 




France, 








2 




Bohemia, 








1 




Italy, 








1 




Portugal, 

Norway, 

Prince Edward's Island, 








1 
1 
1 


780 


Vacation certificates issued during 


the summer 


vacation. 


• 


159 



THE ERECTION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND 
THE SELECTION OF SITES FOR THEM. 



While the average modern schoolhouse is a great im- 
provement over its prototype, the ideal schoolhouse is yet 
a thing of the future. It is no uncommon sight in any of 
our cities to see an expensive schoolhouse constructed of 
tine materials, the creation of some well-known architect, 



superintendent's report. 57 

erected on a lot which it almost or entirely covers, sur- 
rounded by buildings which shut out the sunlight and 
wholesome air, the two primary requisites for the health 
and well-being of the hundreds of pupils housed therein. 
There are no playgrounds about this schoolhouse where 
the pupils may exercise their limbs in wholesome sport in 
suitable weather ; therefore they must remain shut up un- 
til the close of school to be projected in mass upon the 
crowded streets in danger from passing teams or still more 
dangerous electric or cable cars. Or if this schoolhouse 
has a playground it is frequently much too small, or is damp 
and muddv much of the time, either from its low situation 
and lack of drainage, or want df proper preparation for 
the purpose which it is to subserve. There are many other 
types of modern schoolhouses and premises which are 
much more objectionable in their features than the one 
portrayed. 

The site for a schoolhouse should be selected with great 
care and the number of pupils who are to be accommo- 
dated in the school should always be an important factor 
in determining the size of the lot. The site should be dry 
and free from unwholesome surroundings. In parts of 
Germany, borings are made in the soil where it is pro- 
posed to erect a schoolhouse to determine whether the 
land is suitable or not and if proven to be unfit, the site is 
rejected. Whoever heard of such a thing being done in 
this country? It is too frequently the case that a school- 
house site is purchased because some one has some land 
he wishes to sell, or because it is cheap, and not because 
it is most suitable. 

Sanitation should receive also much more consideration 
in the construction of schoolhouses than it does. It is true 
that some improvement has been made within a few years 
in this respect, but there is still by far too much construc- 
tion that is based on guess work or theory rather than on 

8 



58 superintendent's report. 

scientific investigation. Why should not every city have 
an advisory board composed of leading physicians who 
should be consulted when new schoolhouses are to be 
built ! What cit}- would think of building a hospital and 
equipping it without the advice of leading medical author- 
ity ? Is it wise to prevent disease, or to foster it, and at- 
tempt to cure it after it comes? 

There has been a remarkable improvement made in the 
schoolhouses of our city within the past decade. Most of 
them compare favorably with those in the other cities of 
the Commonwealth. But like those of other cities there is 
considerable that may be criticised in them or in their sur- 
roundings. 

Some of the older ones are still very poorly ventilated ; 
the heating apparatus in others has proven inadequate, 
necessitating the closing of schools in them in very cold 
weather. And especially is there room for criticism in the 
selection of sites for some of them. The grounds of a 
number are far too small, and in one or two cases expen- 
sive schoolhouses have no playgrounds whatsoever, or at 
least have none worthy the name. 

But the chief ground for criticism in the matter of school- 
buildings in our city is the delay in purchasing sites and 
erecting schoolhouses after the necessity for increased 
school accommodations has been clearly shown. Several 
hundred children are now housed in rented buildings and 
some of them have been there for two years. These tea)- 
porary quarters, with all that can be done, are not proper 
places for schools to be held. They are not properly 
lighted or ventilated and are not properly situated : but they 
are as good as could be secured in the district where they 
were needed. Two schoolhouses now in process of erec- 
tion will relieve the overflow in one section. One of these 
schoolhouses was asked for by the School Committee three 
years ago. At the same time the Committee asked that a 



superintendent's report. 59 

lot be purchased in the southwest part of the city and plans 
secured for the erection of a building there. As yet not 
even a lot has been secured although one class of the Dart- 
mouth street school children is housed in a store, and there 
are now thirty-five more children in the lowest grades of the 
I. W. Benjamin school than there are seats in these rooms. 
I doubt the expediency of the past policy of our city in fail- 
ing to provide school accommodations as fast as required, 
while children are housed in rented buildings unsuitable in 
many respects, and for which a large rental is usually de- 
manded. That it is the policy of many other cities, some 
of which carry it to a greater extent than is done here, is 
no argument in its favor. 

THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Schools are presumably doing what they are designed 
to do when they are awakening and stimulating the imag- 
ination of the pupils, teaching them to observe the phe- 
nomina by which they are surrounded, training their mem- 
ory, judgment and reason, cultivating in them a proper 
moral and religious sense, which is the source of charac- 
ter, and imparting such knowledge as will be of use to 
them in both their present and future lives. Schools which 
do not attempt to do each of these things are wanting in 
an essential degree. 

The teachers in our schools are working along all these 
lines, and with due allowance for the limitations with 
which all schools are circumscribed I feel that they are 
meeting with good success. Pupils from the day of their 
entrance to school are taught to observe, to state the re- 
sults of their observations, and later to record these ob- 
servations in sentence, story, and drawings. Their imag- 
ination is stimulated b}^ legend, song and picture ; their 
memory, reason and judgment are constantly trained by 



6o superintendent's report. 

suitable exercises ; they are taught obedience to law, love 
of country, habits of neatness and order, self respect and 
respect for the rights of others ; by readings from the 
scriptures each morning and in many other ways as occa- 
sion serves from day to day they are taught to reverence 
their God and his works. 

The course of study is varied in its subjects ranging as 
it does from the study of the vernacular to the interpreta- 
tion of nature's laws and the underlj'ing principles of art 
and music ; from roaming in classic literature to the arts 
of sewing, cooking and wood-working. 

Are all these things done well? Yes, fairly well ; by 
some teachers it is true better than by others, but in most 
rooms as well done as can reasonably be expected under 
present conditions. 

There has been but one change during the year in the 
subjects taught or in the general methods of teaching, 
and that was the change made in the teaching of penman- 
ship. Vertical penmanship was introduced into all the 
schools at the beginning of the fall term. While it is yet 
too early to speak authoritatively of the result, I have no 
hesitation in saying that the legibility of the hand-writing 
of the pupils has already improved wonderfully, and they 
seem to acquire the art much easier than with the slant- 
ing or Italian style. I am quite sure also from my observa- 
tions that the position required of pupils in writing by 
the vertical method is better for them physically than in 
the slanting method, although pupils will assume injurious 
positions in writing by the vertical method if teachers 
permit. 

The departmental plan of teaching, adopted in the 
grammar grades the previous year, has been continued, 
and I think better results are obtained on the whole than 
under the previous plan. As our departmental work is on 
a much modified plan from the plan tried elsewhere — be- 



superintendent's report. 6i 

ing confined to grades — specialization of work is accom- 
plished in a measure, and at the same time a teacher does 
not instruct so great a number of pupils that she cannot 
know them well if she desires to do so. 

The manual training for the boys of the three upper 
grammar grades begun the year before, has been contin- 
ued and with marked success. It is not only popular 
with the boys, but gives them a most valuable itiental 
training. A volunteer class from the High school has 
been in attendance since September, continuing in this way 
the work begun by them when in the grammar schools. 

The cooking school continues successful under the new 
teacher. This course although popular with most of the 
girls is not so universally so as the manual training de- 
partment is with the boys. But I am convinced that the 
instruction is not only valuable in its humanitarian effects 
but as a means of pure mental discipline. Volunteer 
classes from the High school also attend this school. 

The experiment is being tried of closing one of the out- 
lying schools and transporting the pupils into the graded 
schools of the centre. The Plainville school was chosen 
for the trial as that was the smallest of the outlying 
schools and the resignation of the teacher of the school 
gave a good opportunity for the trial. The pupils have 
made marked advance since coming in to the graded 
schools, and this fact is recognized by their parents. Some 
complaints have been made from time to time in regard to 
the arrangements for transportation, and I am sure if any 
demand is made to return to the old plan it will be from 
dissatisfaction with the faults of transportation and because 
provision is not made whereby the pupils may be suitably 
cared for in the noon recess. The Rockdale school was 
closed for a short time also and the pupils given opportu- 
nity to attend the graded schools. But the parents of that 
district declined to give the plan a fair trial and the school 



62 superintendent's report. 

was reopened. I still believe that with a proper system of 
transportation and with suitable arrangements for the 
children during the noon hour that the pupils of the out- 
lying schools, if they were brought into the central 
graded schools, would be more regular in their attendance, 
their training and instruction would be better and the -attri- 
tion with the children of the larger schools would be most 
beneficial for them. 

Several of the grammar and primary schools have be- 
come so crowded that it has become necessary to rent out- 
side quarters for several classes. This is most unfortu- 
nate for several reasons. The rooms, although the best 
that could be secured are far from what schoolrooms 
should be. The pupils are removed from the supervision 
of their principals and the teachers in a great measure 
from the cooperation and assistance of their principals and 
fellow teachers. Two grammar classes are quartered in 
the Hacienda building on Acushnet avenue ; two primary 
classes occupy the vestry of a church on Weld street and 
one a store at the corner of Cottage and Allen streets. 
When the new buildings under process of construction in 
the north part of the city are completed four of these 
classes will again be in proper quarters. When the over- 
flow from Dartmouth street school will be provided for is 
yet not apparent. The I. W. Benjamin school is now 
overcrowded in the lower grades also and must be relieved 
soon. 

The Mill schools are fuller than ever before. The four 
classes now number about 175 pupils. The two which 
have occupied two rooms in the Merrimac street school- 
house have been compelled to move during the year to 
make room for the primary pupils in that section and are 
now quartered in two rooms in the Hacienda building. 
These rooms are not large enough for these schools and 
are unsuitable in shape for school purposes and poorly 



superintendent's report. 



63 



lighted. The teachers labor under great disadvantages 
in conducting their schools in them but no relief can come 
until next fall. I have spoken elsewhere of this short- 
sighted policy of not keeping apace with the growth of 
the city in erecting schoolhouses. 

I give in this connection a table which shows the per 
cent, of promotions in all the grades of the schools the past 
year. It seems to me that the per cent, of non-promo- 
tions in some grades and in certain schools is too large. 
That there are so many non-promotions in the first grade 
is due principally to the fact that classes are admitted 
three times each year ; very few of those admitted in Jan- 
uary or April are advanced until the following year. It is 
very easy for a child to lose a year in his course by not 
being advanced as fast as he should be. Some special 
promotions are made each year but not as many as I wish 
there were. I am inclined to think that semi-annual pro- 
motions would benefit the schools ; certainly many bright 
pupils would be given a better opportunity thereby. 



PER CENT. OF PROMOTIONS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





« 


« 


1 « 


1 9 . 1 v 


1 » 


« 1 




si 

C5 


5l 
98.7 


7th 
Grad 


6th 
Grad 


^2 

"1 


4th 
Grad 


31(1 
Grad 


2nd 
Grad 


l8t 

Grad 


ntth street, 


83.3 


91.5 


89.5 


92.4 








VlidcUe street. 


79.3 


82.2 


89.5 


97.3 


88.5 








Parker street. 


80.4 


77.9 


84.2 


83.8 


78 








rhompsoD street, 






96.1 


88.2 


91.4 , 








Harrington, 








75.8 


74 


80.8 


77.6 


80.7 


50 


4cushnet avenue, 










' J)4.7i 90 


87.5 


50.7 


[. W. Benjamin, 








, 90.2! 82.5 


85.8 


60.4 


3edar street, 






, ! 70.G 


85.4 


78.6 


52 


ZJedar Grove street, 






100 


92.3 80.5 i G5.3 


80.3 


83.7 


51.7 


[^anuonville, 












100 


92.3 


100 


57 


Oartmouth street. 












96.6 


92.6 


91.2 


46.7 


Phomas A. Greene, 










89.3| 


87.7 


92.6 


41.7 


^irlvia Ann Howland, 










84.6| 


84.2 


84.8 


57.6 


[jinden street. 












60.8 


75 


77.3 


39.2 


^errimac street. 












66.6 


80.9 


80.8 


45 


Vfaxfield street. 










90.3i 91.4 


S9.5 


73.3 



64 superintendent's report. 

I give also in connection a weekly schedule of time 
for the different branches taught in the elementary schools. 
This schedule is subject to change from time to time. 



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superintendent's report. 67 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

In my report of the schools for the year 1894 I called 
attention to the fact that the High school instead of in- 
creasing was actually decreasing in numbers. The de- 
crease the past year was greater even than for the pre- 
ceding year. The following table shows the attendance 
upon the High school and upon all the schools for the 
eight years past. No accurate data are available farther 
back than 1888. 





High School 


■ 


All 


THE Schools 


• 


Enrollment. 


Average 
membersnlp. 


Average 
attendance. 


Enrollment. 


Average 
niembersnip. a 


Average 
ttendanc< 


1888-466 


329 


311 


5,477 


3,988 


3,652 


1889-459 


320 


305 


5,696 


4,220 


3,925 


1890-477 


332 


315 


5,853 


4,609 


4,099 


1891^15 


353 


337 


6,383 


5,024 


4,520 


1892-^07 


367 


349 


6,713 


5,379 


4,822 


1893-517 


386 


365 


6,884 


5,54:^ 


4,985 


1894-510 


356 


341 


7,426 


5,751 


5,269 


1895-500 


322 


311 


7,860 


6,004 


5,542 



It is not my purpose to attempt an analysis of the causes 
which have produced this condition ; but it seems to me to 
be a condition that warrants thorough investigation by the 
Board. It ought to be definitely determined whether the 
course in the High school fails to meet the wants of a 
large body of our citizens, or whether the methods of in- 
struction and government in any great measure fail to 
command the confidence of many parents, or whether the 
causes lie wholly without the school. The fact confronts 
us that the average daily attendance in the past year was 
the same as it was eight years ago, 51 less than it was in 
1893, and 30 less than in 1894. ^^^ attendance in the 
lower schools on the other hand during these eight years 
has increased 51.7 per cent, as shown above. 

The policy of the Board has been as liberal toward the 



68 superintendent's report. 

school during the past year as during any — in fact the 
cost of the school per scholar was greater the past year 
than in any of the seven years next preceding. It is there- 
fore not retrenchment that has affected the school. 

Mr. Allen, the science teacher, was granted leave of ab- 
sence in June for a year of study, and is now at John Hop- 
kins University. Mr. Warren R. Smith, a graduate of 
Bowdoin College, and who had also taken the degree of 
Ph. D. from the Chicago University, was chosen to fill the 
vacancy for the year. Mr. Smith had also had some expe- 
rience in teaching before coming here. He is filling the 
position most acceptably. Miss Mary E. Austin, teacher 
of history, was granted leave of absence for the greater 
part of the fall term that she might take a much needed rest. 
Just before the time for her to resume her duties she was 
taken ill, and will be absent for some months longer. 
Miss Charlotte M. Murkland, a graduate of Smith's Col- 
lege and our Training school, is filling the position in a 
most satisfactory manner. It is not a difficult matter to 
secure suitable teachers to fill positions in the schools for a 
year or during a long leave of absence of a teacher, but 
when teachers are absent temporarily the school suffers. 
There seem to be no available substitutes just at present in 
the city for High school work. 

The following statistics relating to the school are im- 
portant and worth perusal : 



Per cent, of promotions the past year by classes. 

Senior, 100 

Sub-Senior, 98.4 

.hmior, 81.8 

Sub-Jiiuior, 77.8 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



69 



Number of pupils who have left school during year and 
causes therefor. 





Boys. 


Qirls. 


Total. 


Seniors, 


1 


4 


5 


Sub-Seniors, 


4 


7 


11 


Juniors, 


12 


7 


19 


Sub-Juniors, 


12 


15 


27 


Toul, 






62 


Causes for leaving. 










Boys. 


Girls. 


ToUl. 


Illness, eyes, etc., 


2 


15 


17 


Moved from city. 






4 


Died, 






1 


To ^^ork. 


9 




11 


Neglect of school work. 


7 




8 


Not promoted. 


6 




7 


Tuition pupil (expense), 






1 


Reasons unknown. 


6 




13 



Total, 
Graduates of 1895 pursuing advanced courses. 



24 



62 





Girls. 


Boys. 


Total. 


College, 


3 


3 


6 


Normal school. 


3 





3 


Swain school. 


3 


2 


5 


Harrington Training school. 


8 





8 


Institute of Technology, 





1 


1 


Kindergarten Training school. 


1 





1 


Post Graduates in the High school. 


6 


1 


7 



31 



Post graduates in the High school during 1895, now 
pursuing advanced courses. 





Girls. 


Boys. 


Total. 


College, 


1 





1 


Harrington Training school, 


3 





3 



4 4 

Pupils entering the High school in September, 1895. 



From Xew Bedford public schools. 
From other schools, 



Girls. 


Boys. 


Total. 


69 


52 


121 


11 


4 


15 



80 



56 



136 



7o superintendent's report. 

Post graduates in the High school in 1895. 

GlrlH. Boys. ToUl. 

Prom January to June, 2 2 

From September to December, 10 1 11 

12 1 13 

Intention of present pupils, concerning advanced courses. 
Classical course, (to enter College with Greek.) 

Senior class, 
Sub-Senior class, 
Junior class, 
Sub-Junior class, 

8 14 22 

To enter College with Greek. 

Senior class, 
Sub-Senior class, 
Junior class, 
Sub-«lunior class, 

23 22 45 

To enter Scientific, Medical or Law schools. 



(iirlH*. 


Boys. 


Totol 


3 





3 


3 


2 


5 


2 


5 


^ 
i 





7 


7 



GirU. 


Boys. 


Total. 


4 


3 


7 


3 


5 


8 


4 


3 


i 


12 


11 


23 



Senior class, 
Sub-Senior class. 
.Junior, 
Sub-fJunior class, 



Glrl)4. 


Boys. 


Tottl. 








i) 





2 


2 





1 


1 








5 



14 14 



Intention of present pupils, concerning advanced courses. 
To enter the Harrington Training, or State Normal school. 



S<?nior class, 
Sub-S«Miior class, 
Junior class, 
Sul)-Jmii(>r class. 



(ilrls. 
15 


BoyH. 



Total. 


18 





18 


11 





14 


12 





12 



:)!> .V.) 



superintendent's report. 71 

THE HARRINGTON TRAINING SCHOOL FOR 

TEACHERS. 

In my report last year I recommended to the Board that 
the normal and training course for teachers in the school 
be made two years long instead of one and a half years, 
and that classes be admitted and graduated once a year 
instead of twice as the custom then was. I gave then my 
reasons for recommending the changes. 

The recommendations met with the approval of the 
Training School Committee, and, upon its endorsement, 
were adopted by the full Board. The regulations govern- 
ing the school organization were also changed in several 
particulars to meet the new conditions, and the sections as 
amended now read as follows : 

Chap. XIII, See. 1, amended Oct. 7, 18y.'> : 

The corps of teaehers shall eonsist of a principal, a vice- 
principal, not less than four regular assistants, and not more 
than thirty pupil-teachers. The pupil- teachers shall be divided 
as nearly as possible into two classes of fifteen members each. 
No entering class shall consist of more than fifteen pupil-teachers. 
If the number of candidates who pass any examination shall 
exceed fifteen, the fifteen candidates only who rank highest in 
the examination shall be admitted ; but the remainder, if any, 
shall have precedence in forming the next class over those who 
are successful candidates in a later examination. Tlie length of 
the course shall be two school years. 

Chap. XIII, Sec. ;^, amended Oct. 7, 18i>5 : 

The two classes shall be known as the Senior and Junior. The 
Senior class shall be composed of those pupil-teachers who have 
already served one year in the school, and have been regularly 
promoted, and of those of have served two years and hnve failed 
of promotion; the Junior class, of those who have served no 
time in the school before admission to the class, and of those 
who have served one year and have failed of promotion. 



72 superintendent's report. 

Chap. XIII, See. 4, amended Oct. 7, 1895 : 

The pay of the pupil-teachers shall be as follows : Senior class 
at the rate of $-1 [)er week for actual service ; the members of the 
Junior class shall serve without pay; but when any pupil-teacluT 
shall be assi^nc^d for substitute duty she shall receive regular 
substitute pay for the grade of school in which she substitutes. 
When a pupil-teacher, is actinjj as substitute, her pay as a mem- 
ber of the training class shall cease. 

Chap. XIII, Sec. 7, amended Oct. 7, 1895 : 

All substitutes in the regular schools shall be taken, when 
practicable, first, from the unassigned graduates of the school; 
second, from the Senior class. Requisitions for undergraduate 
substitutes shall be made upon the Superintendent of Schools 1»y 
the principal or committee needing such substitutes. 

Chap. XIII, See. 11, amended Oct. 7, 1895: 

Examination of candidates for admission to the Traininii 
School shall be held in December of each year by the Committer 
on Examination of Teachers, public notice of which shall Ik* 
given at least two weeks before the examination. (See Sec. 2.) 
No candidate shall be permitted to enter the Training Scho*»l 
after the first week of the term, except by special vote of the 
Training School Connnittee. 

The principal changes are these: The limit of the 
number of pupil-teachers who may form each class is 
raised from nine to fifteen ; the course heretofore one and 
a half years long is made two years long; there are two 
classes where formerly there were three, and admissions 
and graduations are to occur but once a year instead of 
semi-annually as before ; pupil-teachers are paid no salary 
the first year, but are paid four dollars a week for the 
senior year. 

These are the principal changes ; the change in regard 
to salary makes a pupil-teacher serve a half-year longer 



superintendent's report. 73 

without pay than before, but pays her a dollar a week 
more than before for the first half-year of the senior-year. 
I am confident that lengthening the course to two years 
will give strength to the course, and relieve the pressure 
which heretofore came upon the principals in the normal 
work. 

At times one hears the criticism that too much prepara- 
tion is required of teachers by the School Board and some- 
times a pupil-teacher or her friends feel that she has to 
work harder than she should. To the first criticism I 
would reply that it must be made in ignorance of what the 
duties of a teacher are and of the training necessary for 
one to perform them with justice to the children who are to 
be taught and trained by her. There is but one way to 
have good teachers and good teachers are those who bring 
to their work not only the right spirit but the right pre- 
paration. To the second criticism I would say that a 
pupil-teacher who comes to the school equipped physically 
and mentally as she should be will not find the work too 
taxing unless she is attempting too much in some direction 
outside the school. Too many candidates come to the 
school with weak constituticms and weak in their mental 
training and acquirements. Especially is it true of their 
physical condition. I am quite sure a physical examina- 
tion should be required of candidates as well as the mental 
one now given. Too many of our new recruits to the 
teaching corps of to-day are physically unfit to undertake 
the duties of a teacher. 

Again I am sure that the young ladies of the city who 
attend the Training school should be grateful to the city 
for providing it for them. Trained teachers are demanded 
now by an enlightened public opinion, and no progressive 
city or town will employ untrained teachers, if it can be 
helped. Now our city comes forward and offers a good 
training to those who wish to be teachers, and pays them 

lO 



74 superintendent's report. 

for half the time they are getting it. It is true that it is 
done largely for self-protection, but not wholly. The 
salaries paid here and the advantages offered in the city 
will coqpmand either teachers of training or of successful 
experience from abroad. But, instead of pursuing the 
policy of going outside for teachers or requiring those 
young ladies or young men in the city who wish to teach 
to go to a normal school, the city establishes a Training 
School, and pays candidates for service while they are 
attending it. It also gives the graduates from the school 
preference over all other candidates in appointments to 
the elementary grades, or even the High school if other 
requirements have been complied with. So I say that 
those who attend this school as pupil-teachers have cause 
to be grateful to the city for providing it, and should not 
regard it in the light of a hardship to attend it. 

The school has labored under some disadvantage during 
part of the year by reason of the absence of the principal 
during the last three months of the year on account of 
illness, and from the demands made upon it for substitutes. 

The vice-principal. Miss Braley, has charge of the 
school during the absence of the principal, who will not 
resume her duties until fall. A normal teacher will be 
required to assist the vice-principal during the long ab- 
sence of the principal, and it would be very much better 
for the school if a normal teacher should be made a per- 
manent feature of the school ; then the principal and vice- 
principal would have ample time for supervision by being 
relieved of some of their normal work. 

The interests of the children in the school were looked 
after, notwithstanding the disadvantages under which the 
school labored, two additional regular teachers, graduates 
of the school, being assigned there during the fall term. 
Miss Braley also by extra and incessant labor did double 
duty for several months with efikiency. 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 75 

Each year this school adds to the strength of all the 
schools in the city and justifies its maintenance, and would, 
even though the cost was much greater than it is. I give 
below some statistics in regard to the pupil-teachers. 

HARRINGTON TRAINING SCHOOL. 

STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1895. 

Pupil-teachers enrolled during the year, 32 

Pupil-teachei-8 admitted February, IS95, 5 

Pupil-teachers admitted September, 1895, 9 

Pupil-teachers graduated during the year, 11 

Pupil-teachers resigned during the year, 2 

Pupil-teachers in senior class, December, 1895, 4 

Pupil-teachers in junior class, December, 1895, 5 

Pupil-t«achers in sub-junior class, December, 1895, 8 

Days substituting by pupil-teachers, 189 

Days absence for other causes, 161 

GRADUATES. 

February', 1895. 

Sophia Thomas Anthony, Ruth Emily Rowland, 

Lucia Ella Bliss, Laura Clarke Mc Cabe, 

Lila Damon Haney, Sarah Peckham, 

Elizabeth Dexter Hicks, Harriet Augusta Taylor. 

June, 1895. 

Gillian May Gordon, Charlotte Marie Murkland, 

Esther Warren Paul. 

THE EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The enrollment in these schools has been the largest in 
their history, but the average membership was smaller 
than for 1894. The enrollment was 2725 divided as 
follows : 1816 males, 909 females ; the average mem- 
bership was 1069 and the average nightly attendance was 
849. So while the per cent, of nightly attendance com- 
pared with the average membership was 79.6, the per- 
cent, compared with the enrollment was but 31. 



76 superintendent's report. 

The difference between the enrollment and the aver- 
age attendance is not so great as actually appears, as fig- 
ures of attendance as usually compiled, embrace parts of 
two school years. It is, however, larger than it should be. 
There is the greatest difference between the enrollment 
and attendance in the Parker street school, and next in 
order comes the Merrimac street. These schools fail to 
to hold their pupils as well as the others, but I do not 
recognize clearly the cause. One reason I think is that 
they have a larger proportion of those who are not illiter- 
ates who enter them. Illiterates are compelled by law 
to attend evening schools, others are not ; and the latter 
as a rule do not attend regularly and many drop out after 
a short attendance. 

To make the evening schools more attractive to others 
than illiterates, they must supply better the practical 
needs of those who desire to improve their condition, and 
have not time during the day for that purpose. An even- 
ing drawing school is maintained and has been for many 
years, and at an expense per pupil, considering the hours 
given, as great as the High school. Why should money 
be spent freely in this line and not in others? Why not 
manual training evening schools where the drawings may 
be worked out in metal and wood? Why not evening 
cooking schools? They surely are needed. Why not 
evening schools for stenography and typewriting as 
well? 

TEACHERS. 

There are now connected with the day schools of the 
city under pay 172 teachers. Of these seven are teachers 
or supervisors of special subjects, two are special assistants, 
and nine are pupil-teachers in the Training school who are 
paid four dollars a week. There are also seven pupil- 



superintendent's report. 77 

teachers who are serving without pay, making a grand to- 
tal of 179 teachers employed in the day schools. At the 
close of the fall term 65 teachers were employed in the 
evening schools most of whom were day school teachers, 
but making the number of teachers employed by the city 
in various capacities at the close of the fall term 244. 

There were thirteen resignations during the year. Four 
of which were requested by the Board on account of un- 
satisfactory service, and the others resigned to accept 
more lucrative positions elsewhere or for other personal 
reasons. There was one death in the corps, that of Miss 
Mary B. White, which is noted elsewhere in this report. 
There were twenty-one appointments. Seven of these 
were graduates of the Harrington Training school and 
fourteen graduates of college or normal schools and teach- 
ers of successful experience. Several teachers were ab- 
sent on leave, in periods varying from a month to a year, 
chiefly on account of sickness ; the average absence of 
teachers has been more than four a day. All these ab- 
sences require the employment of substitutes. 

It has been no easy task to find suitable teachers for all 
vacancies occuring and for the new rooms opened. For 
in a number of instances it has been necessary to fill po- 
sitions after our, and all the other schools were in opera- 
tion. Our Training school furnishes many excellent 
teachers who are well trained for their work, but not 
enough. Perhaps it is well that we are obliged to seek 
teachers elsewhere. Teachers coming from out of the city 
bring in new ideas, other experiences, and give added 
strength and vitality to any corps, howsoever good it may 
be, but whose experience lies wholly within their own 
city. The new appointments as a whole are doing good 
work . 

The strength of a school system must depend chiefly 
upon its teaching force. If all, or even the great majority 



78 superintendent's report. 

of the teachers in it, are well educated, well trained, of 
high character and earnest purpose its results will be 
good, although the methods used are not the most ad- 
vanced or the appliances perhaps not the latest. I some- 
times think that in these days too much emphasis is placed 
on methods and too little on the personalities of the teach- 
ers themselves. Good methods are desirable but it should 
never be forgotten that the personal influence of the teach- 
ers counts for more. It is therefore the duty of teachers 
to be forceful examples to their pupils. They should be 
well informed, for every lesson draws upon the richness of 
their knowledge ; their acquaintance with good books 
should be extensive, that they may influence and direct 
the reading of their pupils ; their manners and even their 
dress are potent for good or otherwise, for children are 
sharp critics and easily influenced, and rude manners and 
untidy habits on the part of teachers have more influence 
than dissertations on politeness and habits of neatness. 
And more than all teachers should be persons of manly or 
womanly character whose daily acts are devoid of every- 
hing that would lessen in any degree the respect and re- 
gard of their pupils. Is this last too much to expect? It 
is within the reach of every teacher howsoever humble. 

Last year in my report I recommended the placing of 
satisfactory teachers who had taught three years or more 
on the permanent list of teachers. I am pleased to be able 
to say that those of the primary corps who have taught 
three years have been so placed, and many of those in other 
departments I trust will soon be. Those who have been 
so dignified certainly cannot do less than to show b}* still 
greater earnestness of purpose in their work, their appre- 
ciation of the renewed trust placed in them by the Board. 
I am sure they will. 

I subjoin the names of all those who have resigned, been 
appointed, transferred or absent on leave during the year. 



SUPBRINTENDENT S REPORT. 



79 



Nelson Freeman, 
Evangeline Hathaway, 
riara M. Woodward, 
Anna J. Billings, 
Alice J. Lawrence, 
Elizabeth D. Hicks, 
Harriet A. Taylor, 
Esther Paul, 
Julia A. Ellis, 
Ella M. Robinson, 
Anna H. Doolittle, 
T^ida J. Brightman, 
Ruth E. Howland, 
Lila D. Haney, 
Laura C. McCabe, 
Alice Winchester, 
Fanuie M. Clark, 
Louisa M. Newhall, 
Minnie C. Ritter, 
Gillian M. Gordon, 
S. Agues Donhani, 



Francis J. Heavens, 
Katharine N. Lapham, 
Helen Ring, 
Emma A. Gilman, 
Sarah U. He wins, 
Lena B. Hambliu, 
Grace Co veil, 
Mary J. Eldridge, 
Flora E. Estes, 
Elizabeth 8. Foster, 
Florence A. Chaffin, 
Grace Greenwood, 
Anna J. Billings, 



Mary E. Sturtevant, 
Marv E. Austin, 
Susan M. Touipkiiis, 
Sara H. Kellev, 
Josephine B. Stuart, 
Anna L. Jennings, 
Lucy B. Fish, 



APPOINTMENTS. 

Principal Parker Street Grammar school. 
Principal Thompson Street school. 
Aissistant Cedar Grove Street Grammar school, 
Assistant Cedar Grove Street Grammar school , 
Assistant Thompson Street school. 
Harrington Training school. 
Harrington Training school. 
Linden Street Primary school. 
Thomas A. Greene Primary school. 
Merrimac Street Primary school. 
Merrimac Street Primary school. 
Thomas A. Greene, Primary school. 
Thomas A. Greene Primary school. 
Thomas A. Greene Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cooking school. 

RESIGNATIONS. 

Principal Parker Street Grammar school. 
Principal Thompson Street Grammar school. 
Assistant Middle Street Grammar school. 
Assistant Middle Street Grammar school. 
Principal Merrimac Street Primary school. 
Assistant Thompson Street school. 
Thomas A. Greene Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cedar Grove Street Primary school. 
Cooking Teacher. 
Thompson Street Grammar school. 

ABSENT ON LEAVE. 

Parker Street Grammar school. 
High school. 

L W. Benjamin Primary school. 
Dartmouth Street Primary school. 
Harrington Training school. 
Parker Street Grammar school. 
Middle Street Grammar school. 



8o 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



Lizzie E. Oniey, 
VVilletta B. Nlckerson, 
Daisy M. Butts, 
Lucia E. Bliss, 
Lucia £. Bliss, 
Anna J. Billings, 
Elizabeth Bennett, 
Ruth M. Tripp, 
Sarah E. Kir win, 



TRANSFERS. 

from Cedar Grove Street to Middle St. 
from Cedar Street to Middle Street, 
from ThoQipson Street to Parker Street, 
from Parker Street to Thompson Street, 
from Thompson Street to I Jaden Street, 
from Cedar Grove Street to Thompson St. 
from Acushnet Avenue to Maxfleld St. 
from Cedar Grove Street to Cedar Street, 
from I. W. Benjamin to Acushnet Ave- 



Annie L. Burbank, 
Sara L. Tallman, 
Clara B. Watson, 
Carrie A. Shaw, 



TEMPORARY ASSISTANTS. 

Alice P. Terry, 
Mary G. Fuller, • 
Ethel S. Parker, 
Charlotte M. Murkland. 



superintendent's report. 8i 



IN MEMORIAM. 

On November yth, Miss Mary B. White, a teacher in 
the schools of New Bedford for forty-two years, forty-one 
of which she had been Principal of the MaxReld Street 
school, died after a brief illness of one week. On No- 
vember ist she was in her school. 

I have never known a teacher who was more devoted to 
her work than Miss White. Her school was always her 
first thought, and there was no sacrifice she was not will- 
ing to make to promote its best interests. She died, I 
think as she would have chosen to die, with her hand on 
the plough. It may well be said of her "Well done good 
and faithful servant." 

The following resolutions were passed by the School 
Board upon the death of Miss White : 

Resolved, That by the death of Miss Mary B. White, Priueipal of 
the Maxfleld Street Primary school, this Board has been deprived of 
the services of a teacher remarkable for her ability as an instructor 
and for her conscientious fidelity to duty. 

liesolvedn That by her long life devoted to the pupils of the schools of 
this city, she set them an example of noble service which is the best 
instruction that could have been given them. 

Resolved, That the sympathy of this Board is extended to the rela- 
tives of the deceased in their affliction. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be spread upon the records of this 
Board, and copies be sent to the relatives of the deceased. 



II 



82 superintendent's report. 

THE SYLVIA ANN ROWLAND FUND. 

A large portion of the income of this fund is expended 
each year in the purchase of music books and musical in- 
struments, and for their care. Reading and reference 
books take another large portion. The remainder is ex- 
pended for apparatus, primary supplies of various kinds 
and periodicals for both pupils' and teachers' use. 

There is no question but the schools of New Bedford 
have been, and would continue to be greatly benefited by 
the income from this fund if the present method of expend- 
ing it should be continued. But conditions in relation to 
public schools have changed greatly since this fund first 
came into possession of the School Department, as well as 
public ideas concerning them. The school population has 
also trebled in size and changed much in its character, but 
the income is expended in about the same lines as at first. 

Would it not be well to restrict the expenditure of this 
fund to three lines, possibly four? First, to establish and 
maintain in every schoolhouse libraries of reading and 
reference; second, to adorn every schoolroom with works 
of art in the lines laid out by the *'School Art League," 
which is doing this for the schools in and about Boston ; 
third, for the purchase and care of such musical instru- 
ments as would be really useful as an educative force in 
the schools. If this course was pursued for ten years I 
believe the schools of New Bedford would be greatly ele- 
vated. By having libraries of well selected books in 
every schoolhouse the pupils would naturally read the 
books in them under the proper encouragement of the 
teachers, and their taste for good literature fixed for life ; 
brought into contact each day for years with harmonious 
surroundings and works of art an appreciation of the beau- 
tiful and refined would be created within them, and the 
foundation laid for future culture. 



superintendent's report. 83 

I cannot but'feel that the income of this fund, although 
well used, is not used in the most effective way, and again 
I ask the Committee on the fund to give the suggestions its 
consideration. 

CRITICISMS OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The public schools everywhere are the subject of much 
criticism in these days. I do not suppose, however, that 
they have ever been free from it, — certainly not in my day 
and generation. I presume also, that they have deserved 
some of the criticism that has been bestowed upon them, 
and will continue to do so. Candid and just criticism is 
good for them, and should be welcomed by all intrusted 
with their administration whether School Boards or 
teachers. Such criticisms awaken thought and produce 
reforms if needed ; but critics should bear in mind that it 
is easy to criticise and hard to create, and temper their 
criticisms with due recognition of the good that exists and 
have patience with slow-moving reforms. 

One criticism that is often made is that the schools are 
lumbered with fads. This is an easy thing to say, but is it 
true? Some of these critics consider drawing a fad; 
others music, or manual training, or Latin, or almost any- 
thing which does not meet their views as to what shall be 
taught. Now few, if any subjects taught in the schools 
have been placed in the curriculum because they are the 
hobbys or whims of a few people, but from the earnest con- 
viction on the part of many — even if mistaken convictions 
— that they are necessary to the proper development and 
training of the pupils who attend these schools. We live 
in days of rapid evolution, and there is more or less experi- 
menting to meet new conditions. The schools may not 
be free from experiments but it is only by experience that 
some things can be settled and therefore experimenting 



84 superintendent's report. 

must be endured. But many of the changes that have 
been made in the curriculum of the schools are the results of 
an awakening in matters of education caused by a better 
knowledge of the laws of mental development, and from 
giving the child the recognition he should long ago have 
had. The revolution against the methods which held 
sway so long in matters of education was too long delayed, 
and it is the wonder of the thoughtful men and women of 
to-day how the old methods were permitted to dominate 
education so long. 

Another criticism to which the schools are subject is that 
they are attempting to teach too many things. Surely the 
examination of the curriculum of studies in the schools of 
any of our cities would convince one that there is good 
foundation for this charge. How did this come about? 
And what is the remedy? The answer to the first ques- 
tion is not so difficult. To state it in general terms it is 
the attempt on the part of the schools to satisfy the differ- 
ent classes of persons who look at education from a dif- 
ferent standpoint. As Prof. Putnam says, in his manual 
of Pedagogics, in speaking of education, *'The philoso- 
pher looks at one aspect, the practical man looks at an- 
other aspect. The statesman takes one view and has re- 
gard to one end ; the teacher of morals and religion takes 
a different view and has a different end. These aspects 
are not necewssarilv contradictorv, but each man is natu- 
rally disposed to think his own view of more importance 
than any other, and occasionally some over-zealous parti- 
zan insists that his own peculiar view is the only rational 
and reasonable one." 

Therefore the schools are attempting much, and under 
the present organization of most schools too much. But 
woe to the Superintendent and teacher who object to 
the introduction of almost any branch of instruction pro- 
posed by any considerable class of persons ; they are con- 
sidered unprogressive and their positions endangered. 



superintendent's report. 85 

But the end is not yet reached, so far as the expansion 
of courses is concerned, and the proposed enrichment of 
the grammar school courses means other additions. Sev- 
eral cities in Massachusetts and elsewhere have already 
introduced the study of French, Latin and algebra in the 
lower schools. These, in the public schools at least, have 
hitherto been regarded as High school studies. In private 
schools where the ratio of teachers to the number of pupils 
is three or four times that of the public schools these stud- 
ies have been taught at a much earlier age than in the 
public schools ; but the greater number of teachers in the 
private schools permits more elective courses, and more 
elasticity is possible in them than in the public schools 
with the present organization of the latter. 

And this brings me to the question of the remedy for the 
overcrowded courses. Either some studies must be kept 
out of the schools or there must be a readjustment of stud- 
ies in them. Already several methods have been pro- 
posed : one is that of concentration; another is that of 
correlation or coordination. 

Those who believe in the doctrine o( concentration claim 
that all studies may be grouped into two classes ; first, 
real, or thought studies ; and second, formal studies which 
give form and expression to the ideas and truths found in 
the real studies. Reading, language, grammar, writing, 
drawing and all other branches used in the expression of 
thought in any form they call formal studies. They would 
select some real study, such as geography, as the centre 
of all instruction, and subordinate the formal studies com- 
pletely to this. They believe that where a truth is dis- 
covered it will seek some form of expression, and therefore 
the child will spontaneously learn to talk, read and write. 
The study of pupils by this doctrine would be confined to 
the few real studies, and the formal studies would occupy 
no special time on the program. 



86 superintendent's report. 

Those who believe in the doctrine of coordination 
would arrange the various studies along two or three quite 
distinct lines, keeping each line in close touch with the 
others. One line of studies may be classed as humanistic 
and will include history, literature, and the like. The scien- 
tific subjects will constitute another line, and the mathe- 
matical another. The formal studies will be united with 
the others and not form a distinct group. In this way, it is 
claimed, all the objects of education will be attained. 

The principle of coordination finds the more followers 
because it is the more practical and better adapted to large 
classes. It is already applied in a measure in the instruc- 
tion in our schools, and will be more, as it becomes better 
understood by the teachers. 

But I do not believe either the principle of concentration 
or coordination, if applied to the schools, will be a com- 
plete remedy for the overcrowded courses if every pupil is 
forced to take every study in the elementary schools. 
Elective courses are now provided in High schools. These 
will be extended into the lower schools. And it will be 
the right policy, for it will be an attempt to give each child 
the greatest possible opportunity by specializing his work 
at a still earlier age than in the High school. Already in 
those cities where the grammar course has been enriched, 
(as it is termed) some or all of the new studies have been 
made elective and special teachers employed to teach them. 
This policy of course means increased expenditure. 

And this suijgests another criticism that is made quite 
frequently that the schools are costing too much now. 

Costing too much? How can the money of a munici- 
pality be better expended than in providing good school- 
houses, good teachers, and good appliances for work for 
its children ? What money raised by taxation in its expen- 
diture comes nearer the home and the vital interests of 
her citizens? Or in what other way shall her ignorant 



superintendent's report. 87 

native born as well as foreign born be so well prepared for 
citizenship? There is scarcely a city or town in this State 
or in any other of our states that will not spend more per 
pupil on its schools in twenty years, or even in less time, 
than it is doing now, and do it too by the free will of 
the people. Kindergartens will soon form a part of every 
good school system ; elective courses will be provided 
and there will be further extension both in the practical 
branches and in those that relate more closely to the finer 
products of the mind. 

There are other sins of omission or commission with 
which the schools are charged : for some they may be re- 
sponsible and for others not. But certainly the schools 
ought not to be expected to do for the children what it is 
the duty of the home to do. Unfortunately there is a 
growing tendency to relegate to the school and the church 
too much of the moral and religious training of children 
and criticise them because they do not do it better. They 
should supplement the work of the home and not supplant 
it. It is true that about all the training some children get 
is obtained in the schools ; but it should be possible to say 
this only of children of ignorant and debased parents ; 
worthy parents should give no cause for it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William E. Hatch, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



LIST OF TEACHERS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Summer street, between Mill aad North streets. 

Charles S. Moore, principal, 

Chas. T. Bonuey, Jr., sab-master, 

Charles R. Allen, science teacher, 

Warren R. Smith, tem. science teacher, 

Sarah D. Ottiwell,, assistant, 

Elizabeth P. Briggs, 

lijclia J. Cranston, 

Lucretia N. Smith, 

Mabel W. Cleveland, 

Mary E. Austin, 

Helen L. Hadley, 

Emma K. Shaw, 

Edmand E. Baudoin, military inst'tor, 



25 Seventh street, 


S2750 


121 Washington street, 


1600 


absent for year. 




175 William street. 


1500 


184 Kempton street. 


900 


36G Union street. 


900 


129 Elm street. 


900 


72 Foster street, 


900 


81 North street. 


900 


512 Kempton street. 


900 


196 Grinnell street. 


900 


72 High street. 


900 


303 County street. 


300 



Fifth Street : 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



Fifth street, corner of Russell street. 



Grade. 

Allen F. W^ood, principal, 

9 Lydia A. Macreading, assistant, 

9 Emma B. McCullough, •' 

S Mary E. Allen, 

S Sarah E. Stoddard, 

7 Emma A. McAfee, 

7 Mary W. Leymunion, 

<; Annie C. Hart, 

() Mary A. Kane, 

5 (J race L. Carver, 

r> Lottie M. Allen, 



ki 



(h 



k( 



u 



ti 



li 



111 Acushnet avenue, 81900 

17 Bonney street, 675 

300 Purchase street, 675 

25 Madison street, 600 

352 County street, 600 

03 Fifth street, 600 

55 Hill street, 600 

54 Fourth street, 600 

127 Grinnell street, 600 

147 Acushnet avenue, 600 

118 Fifth street, 500 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



89 



Middle Street : 



Summer street, between Elm and Middle streets. 



Grade. 

1) 
9 
8 
8 
7 
7 
G 
6 
5 



George H. Tripp, principal, 
Lucv B. Fish, assistant, 

Lue3' F. Winchester, 
Katharine Commerford, 
Etta M. Abbott, 
[jzzie E. Omey, 
Julia C. Giftord, 
Helen McCoy, 
Willetta B. Nickerson, 
Clara S. Vincent, 
Agnes J. Dunlap, 



(b 



(i 



i& 



(( 



4k 



(fc 



4. 



44 



44 



Fairhaven, 
215 Ma^fleld street, 
Fairhaven, 
Ashland street, 
23:^ Middle street, 
63 Thomas street, 
18 Bedford street, 
3 North Ash street, 
3 North Ash street, 
233 Middle street, 
117 Uillman street. 



Parker Street: 



Parker street, near County. 





Nelson Freeman, principal. 


9 


Anna L. Jennings, assistant. 


9 


Julia F. Coombs, 




8 


Susan H. Lane, 




8 


Emma D. Larrabee, 






Angenette Chase, 




7 


Kegina M. Paul, 




6 


Martha A. Hemenway, 




6 


May L. Petty, 




6 


Elizabeth B. Brightman, 




5 


Mariana N. Kichmond, 




5 


Emily A. Delano, 




5 


Daisy M. Butts, 





87 State street, 
215 Maxileld street, 
134 Chestnut street, 
G4 Willis street, 
14 Parker street, 
35 Dartmouth street, 
29 Parker street, 
17 Lincoln street, 
22 Pope street, 
14 Parker street, 
34 High street, 
East Freetown, 
116 Willis street. 



$1<.K)0 
675 
675 

(;oo 

600 
600 
550 
600 
550 
600 
600 



11900 
675 
675 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 



GRAMMAR AND PRIMARY. 

Thompson Street: 

Thompson street, corner of Crapo. 

7 Evangeline Hathaway, principal, 23 Seventh street, 

6 Cora B. Cleveland, 

6 & 5 Elizabeth M. Briggs, 

5 Mary A. Macy, 

5 Ethel S. Parker, 

2 Angela F. Bowie, 

1 Annie L. Brownell, 

1 Alice J. Lawrence, 

12 



$1200 

assistant, 81 North street, 600 

351 County street, 500 

72 Bedford street, 600 

1 Lincoln street, 450 

111 Dartmouth street, 450 

15 Sherman street, 550 

35 Eighth street, 550 



44 



44 



44 



44 



44 



44 



», 



90 SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 

Clark Street School: 

Located in rented rooms at present. 
Grade. 

5 Alice A. RidiardsoD, 65 William street, $500 

6 Clara M. Woodward, 21 Lincoln street, 600 

Harrington Training School; 

Court street, corner of Tremont street. 

Josephine B. Staart, principal, 464 County street, 81500 

Anna W. Braley, vice-principal, 619 County street, 1200 

Belle Almy, assistant, 201 Cottage street, 550 

Fannie M. Spooner, " 70 Morf2:an street, 500 

Kate Moore, '' 106 Park street, 500 

Grace W.Russell, '* 152 Purchase street, 450 

Lizzie E. Hicks, ^^ 98 Hillman street, 450 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

AcusHNET Avenue: 

Acushnet avenue, near Grinnell street. 

Jane C. Thompson, principal, 25 Madison street, $750 

4 Sarah E. Kirwin, assistant, 101 South Sixth street, 550 

4 Hattle L. Finlan, '' 186 County street, 550 

3 Nellie A. Walker, '' 20 Seventh street, 560 

3 Lida J. Brisrhtman, ^^ 111 Acushnet avenue, 550 
2 Caroline S. Silva, *' 81 Washington street, 550 
2 Caroline O. Pierce, '' 1 Spruce street, 550 

2 & 1 Julia M. Pilling, *' 24 Seventh street, 500 
1 Margaret H. Holmes, ^* 661 County street, 550 
1 Harriet L. Cornell, '' 151 Middle street, 500 

1 Sarah A. Winslow, '' 315 County street, 550 

1. W. Benjamin School: 

Division street, between Acushnet avenue and Second street. 

Jane E. Gilmore, principal, 245 Acushnet avenue, $800 

4 Susan M. Tompkins, assistant, 399 Union street, 550 
4 Nellie W. Davis, '' 115 Summer street, 550 

3 Dora A. DeWolf, " 169 Middle street, 500 
3 Marion H. Swasey, '' Cor. County and Forest sts., 450 
3 Lila D. Haney, '' 74 Mill street, 425 
•2 Alke A. Taylor, '" 299 County street, 550 
•2 S(»pliia T. Anthony, '• 182 Fourth street, 425 

2 Klcaiior V. Tripp. '' 12 Sherman street, 550 
1 AnnioC. 0*(^oiinor, »* 299 County street, 550 
1 Mabel Biiinett, '* 79 Chestnut street, 550 
1 Julia A. Huut, *' 108 Court street, 450 
I Emma L. Gartland, '" 51 Washington street, 500 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



91 



Cedar Street: 

Cedar street, corner of Maxfield street. 
Grade. 

4 Annie S. Homer, principal, 117 Hillman street, 

3 Bessie P. Pierce, assistant, 130 Summer street, 

2 Abby D. Whitney, ** 59 Hill street, 

2 Annie L. Edwards, " 62 North street, 

1 Mabel L. Hathaway, " 278 Mill street, 

1 Ruth M. Tripp, *• 399 Union street. 

Cedar Grove Street: 

Cedar Grove street, near Acushnet avenue. 



Maria B. Clark, principal, 
Louise M. Newhall, assistant. 



4 Kate Sweet, 
4 & 3 Minnie C. Ritter, 
3 Isabella F. Winslow, 
Julia W.Corish, 
Alice P. Winchester, 
Annie G. Brawley, 
Edith K. Weeden, 
Sarah Peckham, 
Gillian M. Gordon, 
Fannie M. Clarke, 
Ruth E. Pease, 
A. Gertrude Wheaton, 
Harriet A. Taylor, 
Laura C. McCabe, 



3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



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131 Chestnut street, 
42 Foster street, 
287 Kempton street, 
54 Bonney street, 
506 Purchase street, 
86 Mill street, 



$650 
550 
550 
550 
550 
450 



$850 
550 
550 
475 
650 
450 



155 Main street, Fairhaven, 500 



68 Waldcn street, 
614 County street, 
106 Fourth street, 
38 Fifth street, 
180 Middle street, 
658 County street, 
345 Cottage street, 
114 Willis street, 
153 Grinnell street. 



550 
550 
425 
400 
400 
500 
500 
425 
425 



Cannonville : 

Rockdale avenue. 

4<&3 Adelaide J. McFarlin, principal. Cottage and Kempton sts., 
2 & 1 Florence A. Poole, assistant, 168 Mill street, 

Dartmouth Street: 

Dartmouth street, corner Hickory street. 

Isadore F. Eldridge, principal, 44 Sherman street, 
M. Eva Schwall, assistant, 

Edith M. B. Taber, 



#550 
450 



4 
4 
3 
3 
2 



k( 



Sarah E. Slade, 
Nellie H. Cook, 
2 & 1 Mary C. Barstow, 
1 Annie F. Smith, 
1 Grace H. Potter, 
1 Carrie W. Bliss, 



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11 Bonney street, 
82 Walden street, 

37 Allen street. 
Masonic Building, 

337 South Orchard street, 
18 Bonney street, 
100 Madison street, 

38 Russell street. 



$725 
550 
550 
425 
560 
550 
550 
550 
400 



LIST OF TEACHERS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Summer street, between Mill and North streets. 

Charles S. Moore, principal, 

Chas. T. Bonney, Jr., sab-master, 

Charles R. Allen, science teacher, 

Warren R. Smith, tem. science teacher, 

Sarah D. Ottiwell,, assistant, 

Elizabeth P. Briggs, 

liydia J. Cranston, 

Lucretia N. Smith, 

Mabel W. Cleveland, 

Mary E. Austin, 

Helen L. Hadley, 

Emma K. Shaw, 

Edmand E. Baudoin, military inst*tor, 



25 Seventh street. 


82750 


121 Wasliin^on street. 


1600 


absent for year. 




175 William street. 


1.500 


184 Kempton street. 


900 


.'{66 Union street, 


900 


129 Elm street, 


900 


72 Foster street. 


900 


81 North street, 


9<K) 


512 Kempton street. 


900 


196 Grinnell street. 


900 


72 High street. 


900 


303 County street. 


300 



Fifth Street 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



Fifth street, corner of Russell street. 



Grade. 

Allen F. Wood, principal, 
9 Lydia A. Macreadlng, assistant, 
9 Emma B. McCullough, -' 

5 Mary E. Allen, 
8 Sarah E. Stoddard, 
7 Emma A. McAfee, 
7 Mary W. Levmuuion, 

6 Annie C. Hart, 
6 Mary A. Kane, 
5 (irace L. Carver, 
5 Lottie M. Allen, 






II 



a 



111 Acushnet avenue, 81900 

17 Bonney street, 675 

300 Purchase street, 675 

25 Madison street, 600 

352 County street, 600 

63 Fifth street, 600 

.•)5 Hill street, 600 

54 Fourth street, 600 

127 Grinnell street, 600 

147 Acushnet avenue, 600 

118 Fifth street, .=>00 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



89 



Middle Stkekt: 



Summer street, between Elm and Middle streets. 



Grade. 

U 

8 
8 
7 
i 
G 
G 
5 
5 



George II. Tripp, principal, 
Fiucv B. Fish, assistant, 

Luc3" F. Winchester, 
Katharine Commerford, 
Etta M. Abbott, 
Lizzie E. Omey, 
Julia C. Gifford, 
Helen McCoy, 
Willetta B. Nickersou, 
Clara S. Vincent, 
Agnes J. Dunlap, 



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Fair haven, 
216 Majitield street, 
Fairhaven, 
Ashland street, 
233 Middle street, 
63 Thomas street, 
18 Bedford street, 
3 North Ash street, 
3 North Ash street, 
233 Middle street, 
117 Hillman street. 



Parker Street: 



Parker street, near County. 



87 State street, 
215 Maxileld street, 
134 Chestnut street, 
04 Willis street, 
14 Parker street, 
35 Dartmouth street, 
29 Parker street, 
17 Lincoln street, 
22 Pope street, 
14 Parker street, 
34 High street, 
East Freetown, 
110 Willis street, 



GRAMMAR AND PRIMARY. 

Thompson Street: 

Thompson street, corner of Crapo. 

Evangeline Hathaway, principal, 23 Seventh street, 

assistant, 81 North street, 

351 County street, 





Nelson Freeman, principal. 


1) 


Anna L. Jennings, assistant. 


9 


Julia F. Coombs, 




8 


Susan H. Lane, 




8 


Emma D. Larrabee, 




mm 

t 


Angenette Chase, 




7 


Regina M. Paul, 




6 


Martha A. Hemenway, 




6 


May L. Petty, 




6 


Elizabeth B. Bright man. 




5 


Mariana N. Richmond, 




5 


Emily A. Delano, 




.*> 


Daisy M. Butts, 





6 Cora B. Cleveland. 
6 & 5 Elizabeth M. Briggs, 

5 MaryA.Macy, 

5 Ethel S. Parker, 

2 Angela F. Bowie, 

1 Annie L. Browuell, 

1 Alice J. Lawrence, 

12 



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72 Bedford street, 
1 Lincoln street, 
111 Dartmouth street, 
15 Sherman street, 
35 Eighth street. 



^liMK) 
675 
075 
000 
600 
000 
550 
000 
550 
600 
600 



ili>00 
075 
675 
600 
(iOO 
600 
000 
600 

vm 

000 
000 

im 

000 



•SI 200 
(JOO 
500 
000 
450 
450 
550 
550 



90 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



Clark Street School: 

Located iu rented rooms at present. 



Grade. 

5 Alice A. Richardson, 

6 Clara M. Woodward, 



65 William street, 
21 Lincoln street, 

Harrington Training School: 

Court street, corner of Tremont street. 

•Josephine B. Stuart, principal, 464 County street, 

Anna W. Braley, vice-principal. 

Belle Almy, assistant, 

Fannie M. Spooner, 

Kate Moore, 

Grace W.Russell, 

Lizzie £. Hicks, 






619 County street, 
201 Cottage street, 
70 Morf2:an street, 
106 Park street, 
152 Purchase street, 
98 Hillman street. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



ACU8HNET Avenue: 

Acushnet avenue, near 

Jane C. Thompson, principal, 

Sarah E. Kirwin, assistant, 

Hattie L. Finlan, 

Nellie A. Walker, 

Lida J. Brifi:htman, 

Caroline S. Silva, 

Caroline O. Pierce, 
2&lJuliaM. Pilling, 
1 Margaret H. Holmes, 
1 Harriet I^. Cornell, 
1 Sarah A. Winslow, 



4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 



it 

14 



I. W. Benjamin School: 

Division street, between Acushnet 

.Jane E. Gilmore, principal, 

4 Susan M. Tompkins, assistant, 

4 Nellie W. Davis, 

3 Dora A. DeWolf, 

3 Marion H. Swasey, 

3 Lila D. Haney, 

2 Alice A. Taylor, 

2 Sophia T. Anthony, 

2 Eleanor V. Tripp. 

1 Annie C. O'Connor, 

1 Mabel Bennett, 

1 .hilia A. Hunt, 

1 Emma L. Gartland, 



$.500 
600 



$1500 
1200 
550 
500 
.500 
450 
4.50 



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Grinnell street. 

25 Madison street, $750 

101 South Sixth street, 550 

186 County street, 550 

20 Seventh street, 550 

111 Acushnet avenue, .550 

81 Washington street, 550 

1 Spruce street, 550 

24 Seventh street, .500 

661 County street, 550 

151 Middle street, 500 

315 County street, 550 

avenue and Second street. 

245 Acushnet avenue, $800 

399 Union street, 550 

115 Summer street, .5.50 

169 Middle street, .500 
Cor. County and Forest sts., 450 

74 Mill street, 425 

299 County street, .5,50 

182 Fourth street, 425 

12 Sherman street, .550 

299 County street, 550 

79 Chestnut street, 550 

108 Court street, 450 

51 Washington street, 500 



superintendent's report. 



91 



Cedar Street: 

Cedar street, corner of Maxfield street. 

Grade. 

4 Annie S. Homer, principal, 117 Hillman street, 

5 Bessie P. Pierce, assistant, 130 Sammer street, 
2 Abby D. Whitney, '' 59 Hill street, 

2 Annie L. Edwards, " 62 North street, 

1 Mabel L. Hathaway, " 278 Mill street, 

1 Ruth M. Tripp, '• 399 Union street, 

Cedar Grove Street: 

Cedar Grove street, near Acushnet avenue. 



Maria B. Clark, principal, 
Louise M. Newhall, assistant. 



4 Kate Sweet, 
4&3 Minnie C. Bitter, 
3 Isabella F. Winslow, 
Julia W.Corish, 
Alice P. Winchester, 
Annie G. Brawley, 
Edith K. Weeden, 
Sarah Peckham, 
Gillian M. Gordon, 
Fannie M. Clarke, 
Ruth E. Pease, 
A. Gertrude Wheaton, 
Harriet A. Taylor, 
Laura C. McCabe, 



3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



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131 Chestnut street, 
42 Foster street, 
287 Kerapton street, 
54 Bonney street, 
506 Purchase street, 
86 Mill street. 



t650 
550 
550 
550 
550 
450 



$850 
550 
550 
475 
550 
450 



155 Main street, Fairhaven, 500 



68 Walden street, 
614 County street, 
106 Fourth street, 
38 Fifth street, 
180 Middle street, 
658 County street, 
345 Cottage street, 
114 Willis street, 
153 Grinnell street. 



550 
550 
425 
400 
400 
500 
500 
425 
425 



Cannon V I Li.E : 

Rockdale avenue. 

4 <& 3 Adelaide J. McFarlin, principal. Cottage and Kempton sts., 
2&1 Florence A. Poole, assistant, 168 Mill street, 

Dartmouth Street: 

Dartmouth street, corner Hickory street. 

Isadore F. Eldridge, principal, 44 Sherman street, 
M. Eva Schwall, assistant, 

Edith M. B. Taber, 



#550 
450 



4 
4 
3 
3 
2 



Sarah E. Slade, 
Nellie H. Cook, 
2 & 1 Mary C. Barstow, 
1 Annie F. Smith, 
1 Grace U. Potter, 
1 Carrie W. Bliss, 



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lb 



11 Bonney street, 
82 Walden street, 

37 Allen street. 
Masonic Building, 

337 South Orchard street, 
IS Botmey street, 
100 Madison street, 

38 Russell street. 



$725 
550 
550 
425 
550 
550 
550 
550 
400 



92 



superintbndbnt's report. 



'n 



Thomas A. Greene : 

Fourth street, corner of 
Grade. 

4 Sarah H. Cranston, principal, 

3 Caroline E. Bonney, assistant, 

3 Eliza H. Sanford, 

2 Sarah E. Sears, 

1 Lillie C. 'nilinghast, 

1 Annie L. Maereading, 

I Ruth E. Rowland, 



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Madison street. 

129 Elm street, 
52 Bonney street, 
112 Fourth street, 
350 County street, 
1 Lincoln street, 
17 Bonney street, 
Bonney street, 



Sylvia Ann Rowland: 

Pleasant street, between High and Kempton streets. 
Carrie E. Footman, principal, 72 State street. 



4 
3 
2 
1 



Mary J. Graham, 
Helen J. Kirk, 
Amelia Lincoln, 



assistant, 12 Court street, 
" 27 Franklin street, 

'' 87 Walden street. 



Linden Street: 



Linden street, near Ashland street. 



4 Elizabeth P. Spooner, principal, 129 Hillman street, 

3 Isabella Luscomb, assistant, 245 Cedar street, 

2 Carrie L. Chapman, " Main street, Fairhaven, 

2&1 Lucia E. Bliss, '^ 44 Chestnut street. 

Adv. 1 & 1 Lucy S. Leach, '^ 163 Maxfleld street, 

1 Esther VV. Paul, ** 29 Parker street. 



Merrimac Street: 

Merrimac street, corner of State street. 



1 Harriet S. Damon, principal, 
1 A 2 Anna H. Doolittle, assistant, 
3 Anna 1. Dexter, " 

3 Addie West, '' 

3 & 4 Ella M. Robinson, '' 

4 Julia A. Ellifi, '' 



223 Pleasant street, 
271 Pleasant street, 
11 Franklin street. 
232 Pleasant street, 
271 Pleasant street, 
34 Hillman street. 



Maxfikfj) Street: 

Max field street, corner of Pleasant street. 

1 Klizabeth Bennett, principal, 40 State street, 

2 Annie E. Pearce, assistant, 151 Hillman street, 
:J Clara (\ M. Gage, -^ 78 Mill street, 

1 Mary E. Pasho, ^* 109 Grinnell street, 



#675 
.500 
550 
550 
550 
550 
4*25 



$000 
550 
.5.50 
5.50 



8650 
.550 
550 
425 
550 
400 



96.50 
550 
5.50 
550 
5.50 
550 



$600 
550 
550 
.550 



superintendent's report. 93 

COUNTRY SCHOOLS. 



ACUSHNET : 



Charlotte C. Carr, principal, 56 Spring street, $700 

Belle B. Wheeler, assistant, 2 Mt. Vernon street, 600 

Harriet N. Hyatt, " Tarklln Hill road, 600 

Clark's Point: 

Mary E. McAuliffe, principal, 380 Purchase street, $550 

North School: 

Mary I. Ashlfey, principal, Clifford, f6(K) 

Mary G. Faller, assistent, Clifford, 400 

Rockdale : 

Lillian T. Thomas, principal, 661 County street, $550 

MILL SCHOOLS. 

North : 

In Hacienda building, Acushnet avenue. 

Emma K. Wentworth, principal, 117 Hillman street, $682 

Mary L. Hillman, assistant, 81 Mill street, 450 

South : 

In Thompson street school building. 

Lucy J. Remington, principal, 67 Fifth street, • $682 

Ruby M. Tripp, assistant, 407 Cedar street, 450 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

r^RAWING : 

Mary W. Gilbert, supervisor, 20 Seventh street, $1300 

Catherine M. Crabtree, assistant 

and teacher of drawing in 

High school, 26 Seventh street, 800 

SlN^ilNG : 

F. H. Butterfield, 03 Willis street, $1900 

Cooking : 

S. Agnes Donham, 226 Kemptou street, $600 

Manual Training: 

Edwin R. King, 271 Pleasant street, $1200 



■I^» 



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